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Old 05-08-2010, 06:28 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,781,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TropicalAussie View Post
Was this the same applicant who you had a telephone interview with?
Another "What Not To Do"
I had a telephone interview with him first, but this was not the same guy I was talking about with the other post. The guy in the other post didn't make the cut for an in-person interview.
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Old 05-08-2010, 06:32 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,781,283 times
Reputation: 13025
Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
Lunch interviews are one of the worst I can imagine and will avoid them at all cost:
1) Don't know what to order - it can be considered too much/too expensive. If I have no choice, I will order a soft drink or coffee.
2) It is difficult to speak with a full mouth.
3) If more people participate, sometimes a private conversation develops among them. I have no idea what to say, if and where to join.
However, it heavily depends on the kind of job and field the company is in. Sales, advertisement, business, finance are different then engineering. Overall, there is a trend to judge people by superficial things like dress, shoes, the way the candidate eats or drinks.
For those who saw the movie "Frost Nixon" there is a wonderful scene when they meet for the first time. Frost steps out of his limo in a pair of Italian loafers. Nixon looks at them and makes up his mind based on these shoes. Boy, how wrong he was!
1. We went to a moderately priced casual table service restaurant. Think along the lines of TGIF or Ruby Tuesday. I don't think anything on the menu costs more than $15, so what to order shouldn't have been a concern.
2. This job has heavy customer contact (along the lines of sales) and there will be regular meals with customers (several times a week) so table manners and the ability to carry on a conversation are most definitely important. And that includes managing what you put in your mouth and speaking.
3. There were only three people, my boss, the applicant, and myself. Most of the conversation was between my boss and the applicant.

Last edited by annerk; 05-08-2010 at 07:17 AM..
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Old 05-08-2010, 06:39 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,781,283 times
Reputation: 13025
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSX View Post
I don't see why some people are so concerned about someone having perfect table manners. As long as somebody can do the job well, and is not a complete slob, why should anybody care?


My table manners are average at best, fortunately I don't need to interview anymore. I'm sure that would hurt me in an interview for a Finance/Accounting position. I'm not "messy" with what I eat, but I don't know all of the rules about which hand to hold the fork/knife in...appropriate meals to order, the "right time" to sit down etc. Maybe designing cutting-edge software for large technology clients is different than where others work. I could come into work in my pajamas and eat jelly donuts in the boardroom, but as long as I keep cranking out great software for my clients, nobody would bat an eye.
Because you don't have to go out in the field and entertain clients. The position we are interviewing for does.

That said, when I was in I/T one of my coworkers was a disgusting boor as far as table manners--to the point of double dipping in the salsa when we had a team lunch at the local Mexican place. There's just no excuse for chewing with your mouth open, double dipping in the salsa, etc. I got to the point where I skipped the team lunches rather than becoming sick to my stomach watching this guy. (Who also didn't wash his hands after using the restroom or shower more than a couple times a week.) We all breathed a sigh of relief when he got fired.

Last edited by annerk; 05-08-2010 at 07:17 AM..
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Old 05-08-2010, 06:44 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,781,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I wouldn't have had a problem with the cherry tomato.

Anyway, many people have bad manners these days. It comes from a lifetime of eating and not interacting with people while doing so. Blame it on the television.

20yrsinBranson
I disagree that most people have "bad" manners. Has there been a decline in manners, yes. Do most people know which piece of flatware to use for which course when presented with a fully set places replete with finger bowls? No. (Although most "family type" places don't have seperate salad forks, dessert forks, etc. so that doesn't help.)

I do however believe that most people have basic table manners. They put their napkin in their lap, use utensils for foods that utensils should be used for, chew with their mouth closed, don't pick up the soup bowl and slurp the soup out of it like it's a drinking glass (at least in a restaurant), don't talk with their mouth full, etc.
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Old 05-08-2010, 04:12 PM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,008,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
1. We went to a moderately priced casual table service restaurant. Think along the lines of TGIF or Ruby Tuesday. I don't think anything on the menu costs more than $15, so what to order shouldn't have been a concern.
2. This job has heavy customer contact (along the lines of sales) and there will be regular meals with customers (several times a week) so table manners and the ability to carry on a conversation are most definitely important. And that includes managing what you put in your mouth and speaking.
3. There were only three people, my boss, the applicant, and myself. Most of the conversation was between my boss and the applicant.
If that's the nature of the job, then lunch interview was appropriate and your conclusions substantiated. I referred to these interviews in general. They are not suitable for every situation.
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Old 05-08-2010, 04:14 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,939,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
If that's the nature of the job, then lunch interview was appropriate and your conclusions substantiated. I referred to these interviews in general. They are not suitable for every situation.
I don't agree. We usually have lunch interviews at some point for all positions over a certain level. These people may have no interaction with our customers. We still like to see how people react and certainly bad manners could be taken in to account.

I'm not talking about elbows on the table or not putting your napkin on your lap. I'm talking about some pretty blatantly bad manners.
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Old 05-08-2010, 10:10 PM
 
4,379 posts, read 4,497,057 times
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The crowing at how this guy is being treated unfairly is odd.

Selection methods depend on the type of job being applied for. Take a clerical job. In most cases, an interview would suffice. But take a senior management position. An assessment centre, psychometric testing, etc. may be needed. As this post was a top management role, then i don't think this selection method is out of place. A top management figure, IMO, should be rounded and have a more complete image. After all, s/he is responsible for the vision of the entire company. Whilst no person is perfect, I think top management people need to be more professional, and be able to carry themselves well.
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Old 05-09-2010, 06:05 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 30,478,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I disagree that most people have "bad" manners. Has there been a decline in manners, yes. Do most people know which piece of flatware to use for which course when presented with a fully set places replete with finger bowls? No. (Although most "family type" places don't have seperate salad forks, dessert forks, etc. so that doesn't help.)

I do however believe that most people have basic table manners. They put their napkin in their lap, use utensils for foods that utensils should be used for, chew with their mouth closed, don't pick up the soup bowl and slurp the soup out of it like it's a drinking glass (at least in a restaurant), don't talk with their mouth full, etc.
Of course, geography has a lot to do with it. Where I live, there is a shocking lack of manners on a day to day basis. Around here, McDonalds is "eating out". I would not be surprised if less than 20 percent of the general population in my neck of the woods would have the slightest clue which utensil to eat with if more than one fork, one spoon and one knife were presented. In fact, I am totally sure of it.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 05-10-2010, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,353 posts, read 45,152,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Of course, geography has a lot to do with it. Where I live, there is a shocking lack of manners on a day to day basis. Around here, McDonalds is "eating out". I would not be surprised if less than 20 percent of the general population in my neck of the woods would have the slightest clue which utensil to eat with if more than one fork, one spoon and one knife were presented. In fact, I am totally sure of it.

20yrsinBranson
Using the wrong fork is one thing, "trough noises" and eating with your hands are completly different.

It's the same with driving - I don't mind sharing the road with people who can't shift a crashbox manual without grinding the gears like I can, but I do expect you to stay in your own lane, not run into my car, etc.

I stand by my previous post on this - life is too short to have to work with people who eat like a pig.
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Old 05-10-2010, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,920 posts, read 25,441,169 times
Reputation: 26486
If someone doesn't know how to eat acceptably, I bet he/she is deficient in other areas as well.

Taking a prospective employee out to eat has been done for years.

Take my advice and never order the chicken.....
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