U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-16-2010, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,539 posts, read 9,947,100 times
Reputation: 9056

Advertisements

Interestingly, the book I am currently reading (Drive by Daniel Pink) cites some research by Martin Seligman that states that law is a profession that favors people with pessimistic and negative tendencies. I haven't read the source research to evaluate its merit, but found it an interesting proposition that sounds relevant to the OP's situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-16-2010, 05:39 PM
 
25,165 posts, read 48,439,985 times
Reputation: 6958
Attorneys are scary people. In my experience a lot of them are intellectuals and very clever but have no conscience or compassion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
I have worked in the legal field for 11 years now (staff, not attorney) and the attorneys that don't make it or who are run off have bad work product, are bad writers, are clock watchers, or are too nice. I work in litigation and "nice" is never a good thing for an attorney in this area - granted they shouldn't treat their staff like crap. I have seen lots of attorneys come and go over the years.

What area of law are you in?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2010, 05:40 PM
 
25,165 posts, read 48,439,985 times
Reputation: 6958
I think that is true from my own point of view. They are not positive people at all. Very doom and gloom to say the least.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
Interestingly, the book I am currently reading (Drive by Daniel Pink) cites some research by Martin Seligman that states that law is a profession that favors people with pessimistic and negative tendencies. I haven't read the source research to evaluate its merit, but found it an interesting proposition that sounds relevant to the OP's situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2010, 07:32 PM
 
491 posts, read 783,202 times
Reputation: 487
Lawyers have one of the highest job dissatisfaction rates of any profession. But I think the original poster has other issues... he/she seems to be too easily pushed around. Maybe the childhood abuse issues are somehow connected? In this economy and in a cutthroat profession people like that can get trampled. Maybe switch to some kind of "rewarding" law which doesn't pay as much but where the job environment is more satisfying? Might be easier to land the job too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2010, 07:32 PM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,874,757 times
Reputation: 3199
Yeah, my personality is one of being nice and helpful and it doesn't exactly go with conducting litigation. Opposing counsel would call and ask me to informally produce something and my natural tendency is to be helpful, "Yeah sure," and that's what I would think in my head, but then I would go to my attorneys and ask them if they want to informally produce the doc and they would say, "Hell, no" even though we would be producing that doc eventually. I just don't think that way. My initial knee jerk reaction is one of helpfulness and cooperation. hahaha - so not compatible with litigation. I have had to learn to be more oppositional in the work place.

There is also sortof a hazing that goes along with being a baby attorney in a law firm. It's just part of the deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2010, 12:16 AM
 
25,165 posts, read 48,439,985 times
Reputation: 6958
lol I heard about that. I think you told me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post

There is also sortof a hazing that goes along with being a baby attorney in a law firm. It's just part of the deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2010, 02:57 PM
 
6 posts, read 22,696 times
Reputation: 18
My experience is that there are some nice lawyers. This is perhaps the exception, especially in areas of law such as litigation, where it is all about tactic. My area of law is IP, so it is a little less confrontational (particularly in solicitor work). As to the allowing people to push me around, as a junior, I simply believed that was part of the job, so I allowed it. When I tried to speak up, the partners would just say "if you don't like it, get it". I worked in another law firm before that, and it could be rough, but not to the extent that I experienced there. I found the woman lawyers harder to work with as compared to the men, and harder on other women compared to the male juniors.

Despite all this, I feel I could be successful in a law firm if I found the right fit. I don't believe all law firms are all the same. At this moment, the point seems moot since I can't find anyone willing to give me a try. I guess with the economy the way it is, few firms can afford the luxury of giving someone a try.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2010, 03:01 PM
 
13,322 posts, read 25,578,684 times
Reputation: 20520
Regarding a history of abuse and other sad things- it's possible that there is an element of PTSD if someone in your work environment acts in a way that pushes an old button (someone being angry, accusatory, whatever it is and maybe the OP's current environment thrives on that kind of attitude.
I have a co-worker who is 68 (now mental health assistant, former computer geek who got laid off one too many times). He has a horrible history of child abuse. He is a wonderful guy, a hard worker, and if anyone speaks sharply to him, he goes into an anxiety attack. (And he does work on one unit where the night RN is a vile nasty person, gets away with it, and seems to target those who are vulnerable. If I were her manager...)
I don't know that all legal environments are the same, but likely coming in as a junior attorney in a regular law job would be pretty much swimming against the tide. Great that the OP went to such effort (with success) to live a life other than that which he/she came up in. But the emotional environment might be too similar, even if the economic/job environment is not.
I agree with the many suggestions of other areas where a legal education could make a great job application. Take federal and state and other civil service exams, pronto. A legal education should help make the OP a good clear thinker, logical, good spoken and writing expression. That's a big thing in many areas. Best wishes to the OP.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: San Diego
2,888 posts, read 6,446,319 times
Reputation: 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColorsOfMe View Post
Having read some of what others here have had to say, let me say this. I have an aunt and uncle who both worked many years in law. They were partners in a small firm the two owned. My aunt went from working as a lawyer to teaching real estate and family-centered classes at a community college, to working as a community development specialist with a university. My uncle now work as a claims investigator for an insurance company.
Give my condolences to your uncle. If I went to law school and ended up where I am now, I would be punching babies on a daily basis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2010, 12:40 PM
 
510 posts, read 1,431,071 times
Reputation: 854
"Finding a job after quitting and is life fair "

Life ain't fair, get a helmet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top