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Old 05-25-2010, 05:10 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,601,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
I did it 4 times and got the job each time.


It took me a while to realize that I;m not suposed to talk a lot at a interview
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Buffalo, trying to leave
1,228 posts, read 3,318,996 times
Reputation: 775
Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
Do you realize how ridiculous this statement is?
It's not ridiculous at all. Now, I'm not sure that it would work 95% of the time, but it's certainly up there. I've found that interviews generally focus alot more on character than on substance (I'd imagine that this could be different in technical fields). It then stands to reason that if the interviewer likes you, they will hire you (so long as you meet minimum standards of education, experience, training, and certifications).

How do you make someone like you quickly? Ask them opinions, listen closely, and make it sound like you genuinely value their judgments.

So his statement isn't ridiculous at all, it's actually the essence of how to interview for a non-technical position.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:46 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,601,121 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthBound47 View Post
It's not ridiculous at all. Now, I'm not sure that it would work 95% of the time, but it's certainly up there. I've found that interviews generally focus alot more on character than on substance (I'd imagine that this could be different in technical fields). It then stands to reason that if the interviewer likes you, they will hire you (so long as you meet minimum standards of education, experience, training, and certifications).

How do you make someone like you quickly? Ask them opinions, listen closely, and make it sound like you genuinely value their judgments.

So his statement isn't ridiculous at all, it's actually the essence of how to interview for a non-technical position.
I totally disagree. WHile making sure that the candidate has a personality that will fit with the corporate culture is important, the most important thing is can they do the job? I dont' care if it's a finger painting specialist position, if they can't do the job then they can be the greatest person on the planet, they still aren't the right person for the job.

I'm not in a 'technical field," I'm in marketing and operations. Even if my boss had liked me but I didn't have the type of experienec and expertise needed for the position, he wouldn't have hired me.

Or maybe you consider anything that requires more skill than pushing a broom to be "technical?"
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Old 05-25-2010, 08:05 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,776,585 times
Reputation: 16146
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthBound47 View Post
It's not ridiculous at all. Now, I'm not sure that it would work 95% of the time, but it's certainly up there. I've found that interviews generally focus alot more on character than on substance (I'd imagine that this could be different in technical fields). It then stands to reason that if the interviewer likes you, they will hire you (so long as you meet minimum standards of education, experience, training, and certifications).

How do you make someone like you quickly? Ask them opinions, listen closely, and make it sound like you genuinely value their judgments.

So his statement isn't ridiculous at all, it's actually the essence of how to interview for a non-technical position.
I wasn't even talking about his advice (which I really don't agree with). It's the 95% claim. There are many, many people applying for jobs. Why in the world would someone claim an interview technique will get someone a job 95% of the time. That is pure and simple a ridiculous statement.
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Old 05-25-2010, 08:34 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,601,121 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
I wasn't even talking about his advice (which I really don't agree with). It's the 95% claim. There are many, many people applying for jobs. Why in the world would someone claim an interview technique will get someone a job 95% of the time. That is pure and simple a ridiculous statement.
Considering he went on how many job interviews before he got the job he has now?
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Old 05-25-2010, 06:19 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
39,615 posts, read 50,313,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Considering he went on how many job interviews before he got the job he has now?
Yes I went on a lot and had to fail before I could succeed.
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Old 05-25-2010, 06:53 PM
 
4,805 posts, read 20,239,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mchelle View Post
Yeah, that's what I kind of thought too, it seems kind of different to bring one to the interview. My only reason for bringing it along is that I haven't had any kind of contact with this person and am hoping it may score me a couple brownie points. But I don't want her to think I'm weird for bringing it.

I'm also not sure about how to arrange my papers then...I know that the cover letter is customarily first but the only thing that I know she needs to see is my resume, so I'm not sure if I should switch the order so it's easier for her to read or what. I'm using clear report folders. Gahh.
Put the resume on top with the cover letter underneath, and hand them to her at the same time. The resume is what she will be looking at during the interview, the cover letter would be something she might read later.

Not sure what the clear report folder has to do with it. You shouldn't be handing them to the interviewer in a folder, they should be loose.
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Old 05-26-2010, 03:51 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 19,763,199 times
Reputation: 4688
When you go to an interview, and claim 'this or that skill' if you can demonstrate it, terrific. As an administrative assistant, can you bring a copy of some minutes you did or 'other reports' (as long as they aren't confidential) or something as proof of your skills?

If you do graphic design as part of your skills, bring a sample. If you claim you were the #1 Salesman in your company, bring proof. I kept all my 'production reports' from years ago when I worked in CS that show my stats. I also will start to bring actual minutes and meeting agendas I worked on as part of my volunteer work. (I got these ideas from an excellent job pod cast). I never thought of bringing office example..(I always bring a portfolio when I go on teaching interviews).

Good luck.
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Old 05-26-2010, 04:01 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 19,763,199 times
Reputation: 4688
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
Tips

1. Let the interviewer do most of the talking

2. Show interest in the interviewer's opinons about the company


95% of the time you will get the job
I doubt it...but that's your experience. Again, it's the sort of 'junk advice' people kick out like 'brush your teeth' and 'smile' at an interview. Most people KNOW to shut up and listen and to be interested in the job.

I've been looking at the amount of jobs in your area since we are kicking around the idea of moving to South Jersey and yeah, there are a heck of a lot of them. I suppose if you don't mind going into Philly and risking life and limb, getting a job there, even with minimal skills is pretty easy.

In places like that, just having a pulse and showing up guarantees you a job. I hardly see people from your area crying about not having a job. I wonder how they'd fair in really tough job markets. If my husband and myself wanted jobs in Philly, with our skills (his in hospitals, mine as a teacher) we'd could have them within a few weeks.

PS This is no slur on the good people who live in big cities trying to find a job. What I resent is people who think 'robotic, stupid advice' is going to work universally. It takes far more than platitudes for those of us in really tough job markets.

Last edited by GypsySoul22; 05-26-2010 at 04:11 AM..
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