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Old 10-14-2010, 09:57 AM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,624,444 times
Reputation: 12537

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistygrl092 View Post
Things not acceptable for a resume...photos, politics, religions, hobbies/interests, references. It's all about work and education and qualifications and accomplishments and that's it.
Here's a question I have though. What if what I did as a hobby significantly contributes to my experience? I'm trying to find some positions as a regular lounge pianist, and a lot of what went into my fourteen years as a jazz pianist is playing with jazz bands, doing unpaid gigs, writing and composing music in my free time. Music has been a major part of my life for as long as I can remember. It's obviously relevant, but playing in jazz bands and forming my own jazz band, going to and being part of improv sessions, writing and composing songs all fit under "hobbies" and "volunteer work." I've written arrangements for standard numbers and also for my own compositions, and conducted and performed them, but all in my "free time." I've gotten paid jobs too but they only contribute to a fraction of my experience.

So my question is, to include or not to include hobbies and volunteer work in this case?
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Old 10-14-2010, 10:02 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,571,346 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Here's a question I have though. What if what I did as a hobby significantly contributes to my experience? I'm trying to find some positions as a regular lounge pianist, and a lot of what went into my fourteen years as a jazz pianist is playing with jazz bands, doing unpaid gigs, writing and composing music in my free time. Music has been a major part of my life for as long as I can remember. It's obviously relevant, but playing in jazz bands and forming my own jazz band, going to and being part of improv sessions, writing and composing songs all fit under "hobbies" and "volunteer work." I've written arrangements for standard numbers and also for my own compositions, and conducted and performed them, but all in my "free time." I've gotten paid jobs too but they only contribute to a fraction of my experience.

So my question is, to include or not to include hobbies and volunteer work in this case?
In my opinion, if you were playing in public venues in jazz bands, even for tips only, this goes under "employment." If it was just garage band stuff, then I'd put it under "hobbies."
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Old 10-14-2010, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,010,327 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Here's a question I have though. What if what I did as a hobby significantly contributes to my experience? I'm trying to find some positions as a regular lounge pianist, and a lot of what went into my fourteen years as a jazz pianist is playing with jazz bands, doing unpaid gigs, writing and composing music in my free time. Music has been a major part of my life for as long as I can remember. It's obviously relevant, but playing in jazz bands and forming my own jazz band, going to and being part of improv sessions, writing and composing songs all fit under "hobbies" and "volunteer work." I've written arrangements for standard numbers and also for my own compositions, and conducted and performed them, but all in my "free time." I've gotten paid jobs too but they only contribute to a fraction of my experience.

So my question is, to include or not to include hobbies and volunteer work in this case?
What you should do is create a "standard resume" and a "professional/musician's resume." I'm a musician myself (viola/violin), and have both types of resumes written up... the music resume lists all of the groups I've performed with, any principal/co-principal seats I've held, competitions, awards, musical education, etc. I use that when applying for anything music-related, in addition to my standard resume.
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 41,371,303 times
Reputation: 10958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soda120 View Post
If it has nothing to do with the job applied for, I think it should be left off.

I saw an application that asked to indicate any volunteer, social, etc. organizations to which the candidate belonged. They specifically stated to exclude religious ones.
I don't know, I've seen similar things on applications before: What are your hobbies? What clubs do you belong to?

None of your business!
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:39 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,571,346 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
I don't know, I've seen similar things on applications before: What are your hobbies? What clubs do you belong to?

None of your business!
It can be beneficial though. I remember several years ago my son filled out an application for a p/t job at Blockbuster. Under "hobbies" he wrote "avid movie buff" which he is. He was offered the job but had found something else in the mean time. The manager told him flat out that she liked his knowledgebase of movies and thought he'd be a great addition as a result.
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:00 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,624,444 times
Reputation: 12537
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
What you should do is create a "standard resume" and a "professional/musician's resume." I'm a musician myself (viola/violin), and have both types of resumes written up... the music resume lists all of the groups I've performed with, any principal/co-principal seats I've held, competitions, awards, musical education, etc. I use that when applying for anything music-related, in addition to my standard resume.
Thanks for the advice! I'd rep you but I have to spread it around.
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Old 10-14-2010, 05:14 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 8,609,816 times
Reputation: 2763
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Here's a question I have though. What if what I did as a hobby significantly contributes to my experience? I'm trying to find some positions as a regular lounge pianist, and a lot of what went into my fourteen years as a jazz pianist is playing with jazz bands, doing unpaid gigs, writing and composing music in my free time. Music has been a major part of my life for as long as I can remember. It's obviously relevant, but playing in jazz bands and forming my own jazz band, going to and being part of improv sessions, writing and composing songs all fit under "hobbies" and "volunteer work." I've written arrangements for standard numbers and also for my own compositions, and conducted and performed them, but all in my "free time." I've gotten paid jobs too but they only contribute to a fraction of my experience.

So my question is, to include or not to include hobbies and volunteer work in this case?
Volunteer work always looks good. Shows you are the kind of person who gives back to the community. I still say no to hobbies.
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Old 10-14-2010, 05:15 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 8,609,816 times
Reputation: 2763
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
It can be beneficial though. I remember several years ago my son filled out an application for a p/t job at Blockbuster. Under "hobbies" he wrote "avid movie buff" which he is. He was offered the job but had found something else in the mean time. The manager told him flat out that she liked his knowledgebase of movies and thought he'd be a great addition as a result.
Great to mention in a cover letter, not on a resume.
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Old 10-14-2010, 05:18 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,571,346 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistygrl092 View Post
Great to mention in a cover letter, not on a resume.
Think about it for a minute. We're talking a teenager applying for a minimum wage job at Blockbuster. What cover letter? They won't even take a resume, they want an application filled out.
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Old 10-14-2010, 05:50 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 8,609,816 times
Reputation: 2763
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Think about it for a minute. We're talking a teenager applying for a minimum wage job at Blockbuster. What cover letter? They won't even take a resume, they want an application filled out.
Right, but I think most of us on here are not teen-agers. I agree that for a teen-ager it's fine.
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