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Old 09-24-2010, 04:02 PM
 
16 posts, read 22,881 times
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I agree with you, Mystique. One of the reasons I left the Midwest and returned to Austin was b/c I thought it would be more progressive, less judgmental and conservative. When I went to college here, this used to be my little hippie town (25 years ago!). I cannot even get an interview here- So good for you on at least getting that far. And I swear I have stripped my resume' of virtually all dates (God forbid they see my undergraduate date of '82 and law degree in '91- LOL!) And I keep my work history paired down to just the last 10 years. I have been a Project Manager in construction and design for almost 18 years and can't even get a look-see. I suspect the age (that they estimate from maybe googling me?), PLUS the fact I am a woman in a male dominated industry, PLUS having run my own companies is just the 3 nails in the coffin for me! Good luck on your interview!
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Old 09-24-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,858,297 times
Reputation: 3336
Mgrif, if I was the employer, based on everything you just stated about your previous experience, I would consider hiring you. Unless they can see a picture of you and your birthdate when they google you, I don't think they can get an accurate sense of your age when googling you. I say, let's put the shoe on the other foot. If they are googling us, facebooking, and doing all kind of investigation to find out our age because they are so overly focused on hiring Gen Y - how about we start doing the same research online, in the libraries by word of mouth, using print sources like Newsweek or the local trade mags, to pull up "The Best Companies to Work for If You are 40 and Over".Go out, get your local newspaper, or regional trade publication and find articles on companies that really are "progressive." What are the publications that target the 40 and over reading base? This is a hot topic because a lot of very qualified, intelligent people are having problems finding work and are becoming the "New Underclass". It doesn't have to be that way. For example, when I step into a company space for an interview, if I see everyone is Generation Y, I already know that I, as the Generation X, do not fit the "company culture." My chances are 0 that they will hire me. We should seek like-minded people and work for them and with them.
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Old 09-25-2010, 05:05 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,571,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougstech View Post
Why mention any of these things unless specifically asked?
How else are you going to explain that it's been five years since you worked?
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Old 10-07-2010, 09:15 AM
 
16 posts, read 22,881 times
Reputation: 23
Exactly, Annerk- the time lapse thing is really becoming an issue. Some of us, through no fault of our own, have been out of the workforce for 6 months, a year, or longer. Whether you lost your job, your own company went under, you relocated, had to come out of retirement, or have been otherwise kept from working a "real" job, the gap on your employment history is a red flag. I agree it is a little smug of those sitting in the HR chair to cast stones. Most of us aren't just lounging around in our bathrobes watching soaps- we are online for hours every day, meeting with headhunters, scouring the papers and jobsites, making calls, keeping fit, focusing on what we can- like family or community. And, frankly, previously self-employed people might as well have been unemployed as far as the 'warm' reception we are getting out there. I get the impression they are suspect on 'why' our businesses are no longer running- like it is our fault, not the economy! It sucks.
And Mystique13, you have inspired me to start a thread of my own on this very topic- thanks!
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Old 10-07-2010, 05:50 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,858,297 times
Reputation: 3336
Keep me posted about your progress. I am just interviewing and job hunting like the world is about to end. Age is also how you feel. If you go in there with upbeat energy, updated style, no hint of any bitterness (even if you justifiably are), put some interesting hobbies on your resume - you can defy their "age stereotype". You will walk out of there feeling confident and knowing that you have done your part. If they can't do theirs, it's on them. It's their loss. Their over emphasis on hiring Generation Y will come back to bite them. I have heard a lot of employers and workers alike complaining how Generation Y lacks the discipline, tact, and work ethic needed. One woman told me she had a short lived Generation Y hiree who didn't know how to property use spelling and grammar, file or tell time on a traditional wall clock, as she only knew how to tell digital time. She was rude to the clients as well. This girl lasted 2 weeks. What comes around goes around.
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Old 10-07-2010, 05:51 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
2,043 posts, read 4,858,297 times
Reputation: 3336
Oops. I meant "properly use spelling and grammar." It's dark in here.
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique13 View Post
Keep me posted about your progress. I am just interviewing and job hunting like the world is about to end. Age is also how you feel. If you go in there with upbeat energy, updated style, no hint of any bitterness (even if you justifiably are), put some interesting hobbies on your resume - you can defy their "age stereotype". You will walk out of there feeling confident and knowing that you have done your part. If they can't do theirs, it's on them. It's their loss. Their over emphasis on hiring Generation Y will come back to bite them. I have heard a lot of employers and workers alike complaining how Generation Y lacks the discipline, tact, and work ethic needed. One woman told me she had a short lived Generation Y hiree who didn't know how to property use spelling and grammar, file or tell time on a traditional wall clock, as she only knew how to tell digital time. She was rude to the clients as well. This girl lasted 2 weeks. What comes around goes around.
I know a couple of young people who have that problem. It's really bizarre! I realized one day that one of my daughter's friends couldn't tell time on an analog clock. She's 19.
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Old 10-09-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,010,327 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
How else are you going to explain that it's been five years since you worked?
There are many ways to explain a resume gap, as you mentioned in an earlier post... sabbatical, raising a family, financial independence, self-employment, educational training, etc. My resume has a few gaps (no more than a year), and none of them had to do with retirement - mostly explained by college & graduate school, in my case.

Speaking of resumes and age, I'm really glad mine doesn't say anything about high school. I graduated from high school in 1994, but took a good deal of time off before completing college... so my college graduation date is 2002, and 2006 for the master's, leading employers to believe I'm a bit younger. I'm not over 40 yet, but even being in your mid-30s can place you below a younger applicant. And since they can't ask outright, I hope they assume I went straight from high school to college - which would make me around 30 instead of 34. Luckily it's not much of an issue in my field, since librarians are traditionally older anyway.
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Old 10-09-2010, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,010,327 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique13 View Post
In the end, you just have to move on to the next opportunity and get over their ignorance. It's pure ignorance. I'm not even 40 yet and people are already asking me and giving me weird looks? It's their problem, not mine. Moving on....next.....
My sister encountered a similar situation once, where she was interviewing for a job and they asked about her family... this was a position in the sports industry, and one of the panel members mentioned a concern about hiring a "working mother" (not sure how they knew, but she had a young daughter at the time). She professionally and politely skirted around the question, and the supervisor apparently gave that other guy a nasty look - basically like "you can't ask that, dummy!" She ended up getting the job, and obviously handled the illegal question perfectly.

Ironically she had another kid within the first year of working there, but literally worked until the day she gave birth. Believe it or not, she was actually doing a conference call while laboring - actually told the co-worker on the other line "Okay, we can talk for 3 minutes at time!" (in-between contractions) Her husband thought she was crazy, LOL. Bottom line, they would have been wrong to judge her for being a mom, and I'm glad the other interviewers could see that... she received a huge promotion in less than two years, and is one of their most valued employees. But they almost lost her with that one inappropriate question!

Last edited by gizmo980; 10-09-2010 at 10:25 PM..
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Old 10-09-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Midwest
29 posts, read 162,812 times
Reputation: 54
Perfectly said. A bit of Radiesse goes a long way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgrif426 View Post
Don't kid yourselves- AGE is definitely a factor. Employers cannot come right out and say it but they seem to all want younger applicants- under 40- because, psychologically, there is a misnomer that those people have more energy, can work harder & longer, are more eager to impress, and can be trained and molded. Over 40 seems to be the kiss of death (ESPECIALLY for women!!) - potential employers wonder why you may be looking for and/or changing jobs 'at your age'. We are supposed to be fully embedded in a stable career at this point in our lives, right? Unfortunately, there are many displaced and unemployed people my age through no fault of their own- from corporate downsizing, businesses closing, stores and banks going bankrupt, & the housing industry imploding. We network, we spend months filling out on-line applications, we stalk the coffeeshops, we go back to school or get retrained, and we carefully craft our resumes to suit each individual job applied for, we even move to cities and regions where we think the opportunities will be better. And yes, lots of retirees are coming out as well because those funds they counted on simply aren't there anymore. But a lot more people have simply not been in the workforce because we have not gotten a job yet to replace the last one. So we fill in that blank time with volunteer work, and fudge the dates as best we can.
But the fact remains we, over 40'ers, are competing to get back in the game with a wave of new, younger players. Everyone wants to appear younger to level the playing field- it's been great for the plastic surgery business! My resume has since been stripped of any reference to dates of graduation, and I only go back about 10 years of work history- plus you better make sure your picture on any of the social websites make you look fresh and vibrant! So much for proudly wearing the badge of experience- that saying of "40 is the new 30" came from someone in Hollywood, not the real world.
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