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Old 12-28-2011, 11:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Cause they're the only restaurants open on Christmas.
In NYC, it is now possible to eat Japanese food on Christmas as Japanese restaurants are also open!
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Some of us Muslims are doing the same thing, Eating in a Chinese Restaurant on Christmas Day. In the past Muslims stayed away from Chinese Restaurants for fear pork may be in some of the food. However, some of us have learned it is possible to get halal food prepared separately. Although most of us stick to the sea food and vegetable dishes.
While devout Muslims may be able to do this, devout Jews can not because nothing, from the plates and silverware, the woks and even the vegetables, in a typical Chinese restaurant is kosher because of the presence of pork and seafood.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
3,334 posts, read 3,340,538 times
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Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
While devout Muslims may be able to do this, devout Jews can not because nothing, from the plates and silverware, the woks and even the vegetables, in a typical Chinese restaurant is kosher because of the presence of pork and seafood.
The mere presence of crab legs, shrimp and Moo Shu Pork ruins everything? Can't you just pick the beef, chicken or vegetables and all is well? Or is it if they touched the plates/silver at anytime it makes things un-Kosher even if they've been washed? What happens if you go to someone's house (say a gentile) who had shrimp a week ago, washed their dishes well and served a meal to you that took into consideration your dietary requirements, but served on those plates without your knowledge? What happens if you found out later?

Serious questions and just trying to understand. I'm a Comanche and we eat just about anything...except dog. We leave that to the Lakota and Cheyenne.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
The mere presence of crab legs, shrimp and Moo Shu Pork ruins everything? Can't you just pick the beef, chicken or vegetables and all is well? Or is it if they touched the plates/silver at anytime it makes things un-Kosher even if they've been washed? What happens if you go to someone's house (say a gentile) who had shrimp a week ago, washed their dishes well and served a meal to you that took into consideration your dietary requirements, but served on those plates without your knowledge? What happens if you found out later?

Serious questions
just trying to understand. I'm a Comanche and we eat just about anything...except dog. We leave that to the Lakota and Cheyenne.

Jews who follow that level of observance would not eat in a non kosher restaurant or would they eat in a gentile house.

I have friends who are conservative and when their orthodox families come to visit they eat off of paper plates and buy only kosher prepared foods. Much of it comes in its own packaging so it is not cooked in pots and pans.
Many get around it by only going to their orthodox families homes to eat.

Many of my Jewish friends are vegetarian so they never cook meat in their homes.

But as Jews have mixed families, when it comes to the levels of being observant it does create problems.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:42 PM
 
3,043 posts, read 1,302,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
The mere presence of crab legs, shrimp and Moo Shu Pork ruins everything? Can't you just pick the beef, chicken or vegetables and all is well? Or is it if they touched the plates/silver at anytime it makes things un-Kosher even if they've been washed? What happens if you go to someone's house (say a gentile) who had shrimp a week ago, washed their dishes well and served a meal to you that took into consideration your dietary requirements, but served on those plates without your knowledge? What happens if you found out later?

Serious questions and just trying to understand. I'm a Comanche and we eat just about anything...except dog. We leave that to the Lakota and Cheyenne.
Fullback, I can answer your question. Devout Jews will not eat in the home of anyone other than other devout Jews. Merely washing the plates, or refraining from pork etc isn't good enough. I wont even eat in the home of another Jew - even one who refrains from mixing milk and meat or pork, unless that Jew is:

1. A Torah Observant Jew
2. Can demonstrate that they have fully "kashered" their home and all it's contents

The Torah teaches us that if any item of food is shown to be more than 1/60th unkosher, then it is considered treif, and is not edible.

For a devout jew to eat in a restaurant, that restaurant must provide similar "proof' of their kashrus standards, which is done via organizations called "Vaad Hakashrus." If the local Vaad is know to be a reputable Vaad (you must check with your local Orthodox Rabbi to know which are good), and that Vaad gives their approval of the restaurant, then a devout Jew may eat in that restaurant. Outside of New York City, there are few cities in the US with more than 5-10 kosher restaurants. My town, for instance, has less than 10 kosher restaurants (thank G-d we have some), so that's the short list of restaurants I'll eat in. All other restaurants are not only forbidden for a jew to eat it, a jew may not even step inside one of these restaurants for fear of misleading another jew into thinking it's kosher (a concept called maris ayin).
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:50 PM
 
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Just to give you examples of how many kosher restaurants there are in most big cities:

Atlanata - has 4 or 5 kosher restaurants
St Louis - Has 1 or 2
Dallas - 6 or 7
Boca Raton, FL - Just under 20 (South Florida in total has about 50-60)
Phoenix - None that I'm aware of, and that's a town of a million plus people.
Kansas City - None that I'm aware of
San Francisco - None that I'm aware of
Los Angeles - Not sure, but maybe 20-30?
Toronto - I've heard 100+, but I'm not sure
Seattle - maybe 3 or 4?
New York City - For sure more than 100

And these are town where you'll find Orthodox Jews. In places where you will not typically find Orthodox Jews, you will not find any kosher restaurants.

When I travel on business to big towns, I do my research before hitting the road to see where I can eat. When I travel to smaller towns, I just bring bananas and granola bars to get me through until I return home.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:56 PM
 
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An Observant Jew also will not eat any food (even if all the ingrediants are kosher and it was prepared using kosher utinsels) if it was cooked by a non-Jew. This concept is called Bishul Akum, and it was enacted by the rabbi's in order to prevent Jews from dining with non-Jews, which might lead to inter-marrying with a non-Jew.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:56 PM
 
9,343 posts, read 16,929,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
The mere presence of crab legs, shrimp and Moo Shu Pork ruins everything? Can't you just pick the beef, chicken or vegetables and all is well? Or is it if they touched the plates/silver at anytime it makes things un-Kosher even if they've been washed? What happens if you go to someone's house (say a gentile) who had shrimp a week ago, washed their dishes well and served a meal to you that took into consideration your dietary requirements, but served on those plates without your knowledge? What happens if you found out later?

Serious questions and just trying to understand. I'm a Comanche and we eat just about anything...except dog. We leave that to the Lakota and Cheyenne. ;)
Fullback, you might get a better idea from this explanation of what was needed to be done to make the White House kitchen kosher for Chanukah: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/14/di...r-a-party.html
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzymom View Post
Jews who follow that level of observance would not eat in a non kosher restaurant or would they eat in a gentile house.

I have friends who are conservative and when their orthodox families come to visit they eat off of paper plates and buy only kosher prepared foods. Much of it comes in its own packaging so it is not cooked in pots and pans.
Many get around it by only going to their orthodox families homes to eat.

Many of my Jewish friends are vegetarian so they never cook meat in their homes.

But as Jews have mixed families, when it comes to the levels of being observant it does create problems.
Let me follow up my earlier post about the strictness of eating in a non-kosher home by saying I agree with jazzymom above. It is posible for a Jew to eat in a home where they do not keep kosher, but an amazing amount of work must be done in order to be able to eat there, including what jazzymom describes above (paper plates, sealed foods, and much more).
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Old 12-28-2011, 01:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Let me follow up my earlier post about the strictness of eating in a non-kosher home by saying I agree with jazzymom above. It is posible for a Jew to eat in a home where they do not keep kosher, but an amazing amount of work must be done in order to be able to eat there, including what jazzymom describes above (paper plates, sealed foods, and much more).
Or, you could simply have one or more hard boiled eggs, served still in its shell on a paper plate.
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