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Old 06-03-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
2,538 posts, read 4,690,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
I hate to rain on the parade, but it seems to me that there is a lot of mixing of essentially middle European food staples, the application of Yiddish to most, with a smattering of foods that are truly Jewish in origin. For example the ubiquitous bagel is of 17th century Polish origin, where that origin is Jewish is highly speculative at best and that is just one example.
What difference does it make? Most jewish culture has been collected from the various regions where jews have lived. So who cares about th origin of a particlar food (for the purposes of this thread) if they are currently considered jewish fare.

The only thing on my list that hasnt been mentioned is farfel and onions. And latkes...surely someone mentioned latkes.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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You see a lot of Central and Eastern European foods and the use of Yiddish because the vast majority of Jews in the U.S., Canada, South Africa, and the UK are Ashkenazi Jews, an Eastern European ethnic group.

I do agree that it's amusing when American Jews think such foods like challah (zopf), bagels, and blintzes are distinctively Jewish, but I suppose you can't blame them because there aren't that many Eastern European people in the U.S.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Borakus, Baba Ganush, Matza Brei, Kugel, Kishka
Had no idea Babaganush was considered Jewish. I usually get it at a Turkish deli.

But oh...a real pastrami on rye with a Dr. Brown's cream soda...this goy would walk miles for that. Fortunately, there are still a few good Jewish delis within a short drive here in NJ.
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Old 06-05-2013, 08:27 PM
 
31,385 posts, read 32,092,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
What difference does it make?
Well, for one thing, I'm into food and cooking. For another thing Passover and Yom Kippur are moving to my house since my mother-in-law has moved to an assisted living center so naturally the thread caught my eye thinking that I might learn something about "Jewish" food that I didn't know. So after reading through the thread, I started to wonder, what actually constitutes "Jewish" food. Much to my dismay most of what is listed just isn't of Jewish origin. Sooo, if there is going to be a thread about Jewish food, then I would suggest that it be about Jewish food.
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,359 posts, read 24,099,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
...such foods like challah , bagels, blintzes ....
when I go into Whole Foods or Food of All Nations I'm going to find these items under the Jewish used names. Go into nearly any store and ask for Cheese filled crepes and they have no clue, yet say blintzes and they know exactly what you want.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Had no idea Babaganush was considered Jewish. I usually get it at a Turkish deli.
Its common amongst Sephardic/Mizrahi Jews and Arabs. It goes along with Falafel and Hummus. Say any of these three words anywhere from Morocco to UAE and they automatically know what it is and have it on their menu.
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Old 06-06-2013, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
2,538 posts, read 4,690,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
Well, for one thing, I'm into food and cooking. For another thing Passover and Yom Kippur are moving to my house since my mother-in-law has moved to an assisted living center so naturally the thread caught my eye thinking that I might learn something about "Jewish" food that I didn't know. So after reading through the thread, I started to wonder, what actually constitutes "Jewish" food. Much to my dismay most of what is listed just isn't of Jewish origin. Sooo, if there is going to be a thread about Jewish food, then I would suggest that it be about Jewish food.
I guess I disagree what constitutes Jewish food. I don't think the origin matters any more than the origin of the apple pie, which originated in England. There were no native apple trees in the Colonies, but apple pie is still considered a distinctly American dish. I would consider your definition something of more historical value than practical value. It seems pretty apparent to me that the thread was intended to be a fun sharing of what most of us think of as Jewish cuisine. If I were making Passover at my house for the first time, I would definitely include modern menu items or people will be disappointed, regardless of the origin of the dish.
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Old 06-06-2013, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,039 posts, read 54,552,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
when I go into Whole Foods or Food of All Nations I'm going to find these items under the Jewish used names. Go into nearly any store and ask for Cheese filled crepes and they have no clue, yet say blintzes and they know exactly what you want.




Its common amongst Sephardic/Mizrahi Jews and Arabs. It goes along with Falafel and Hummus. Say any of these three words anywhere from Morocco to UAE and they automatically know what it is and have it on their menu.
I like and eat them all. To be clear, I just always thought of all those foods as Middle Eastern but not specifically Jewish as you would regard, say, borscht or pastrami.
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,359 posts, read 24,099,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I like and eat them all. To be clear, I just always thought of all those foods as Middle Eastern but not specifically Jewish as you would regard, say, borscht or pastrami.
Maybe the title of the thread should have been Favorite American/Canadian Jewish foods. Since most of the foods listed are staples to either European or Middle Eastern countries and not specifically Jewish.
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Old 06-07-2013, 07:48 AM
 
Location: CO
2,591 posts, read 6,002,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Maybe the title of the thread should have been Favorite American/Canadian Jewish foods. Since most of the foods listed are staples to either European or Middle Eastern countries and not specifically Jewish.
Yes, overall, historically, Jewish food has been the food of whatever the area folks live in, adapted as necessary to follow the rules of kashrut.

About the only two foods I can think of right now that might be considered specifically Jewish in origin are charoset and matzah - and maybe Manischewitz and Mogen David wines (yeah, that's a joke).

We might add to the list foods like sufganiyot or hamantaschen, or latkes - foods we traditionally enjoy for specific holidays - but even they are riffs on foods of the region where the Jews live or used to live.

Last edited by suzco; 06-07-2013 at 08:02 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:56 AM
 
32,532 posts, read 30,656,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I like and eat them all. To be clear, I just always thought of all those foods as Middle Eastern but not specifically Jewish as you would regard, say, borscht or pastrami.
Pastrami is available at just about every non-chain hamburger stand in Southern California which is one huge mix of peoples and cultures. The word "pastrami" is often painted on the building. Everyone eats it. My provincialism is showing. I think of it as a So Cal food, not a Jewish food. And yummy goodness.

Last edited by DewDropInn; 06-07-2013 at 10:19 AM..
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