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Old 07-14-2013, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I just realized that Chabad doesn't allow women to chant the Torah. While I understand many of the other prohibitions and I really don't mind the separation of men and women, this one really bothers me.

What other big differences are there?
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:39 PM
 
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We pray to the same G-d, other than that, you'll mostly want to look at the similarities between Conservative and Reform. Those two movements are nearly indistinguishable. I have belonged to all three types of shuls in my life, and I find the practices inside an Orthodox shul to be nearly completely different in every imaginable way than Conservative and Reform. I am almost entirely unable to distinguish Conservative and Reform.
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:06 PM
 
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What other big differences are there?
The one big difference is that orthodox follows Halacha (Torah law), while conservative, reform, and the other watered down versions do not.

The same thing for shuls. Orthodox Shuls, even the most modern, conduct services and are built according to halacha and tradition.
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I thought Conservative was somewhere in between Reform and Orthodox? I've been to Reform and don't really care for it, although I only attended once. I'd love to hear the perspective of someone in a Conservative shul.
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
I thought Conservative was somewhere in between Reform and Orthodox? I've been to Reform and don't really care for it, although I only attended once. I'd love to hear the perspective of someone in a Conservative shul.
The key is to find a shul with the style you like, but always keep you focus on the Torah and the observance of mitzvos. Conservative is definitely not a middle ground between reform and conservative. Conservative is an offshoot breakaway movement from the reform movement, where it has its historic roots. Conservative shuls are virtually nothing like Orthodox shuls and are more like reform plus a little extra Hebrew. The Conservative shul my parents go to, for instance, does not have a single member of the shul in walking distance to the shul, and hence not one single shomer Shabbos family. That's the main thing that makes them indistinguishable from reform.

When we recite shema at least twice every day, we are accepting upon ourselves the "yolk of heaven," i.e. the acceptance of the validity of all 613 mitzvos.
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:32 PM
 
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When we recite shema at least twice every day, we are accepting upon ourselves the "yolk of heaven," i.e. the acceptance of the validity of all 613 mitzvos.
umm... yoke
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
I just realized that Chabad doesn't allow women to chant the Torah. While I understand many of the other prohibitions and I really don't mind the separation of men and women, this one really bothers me.

What other big differences are there?
It's really going to vary by which synagogue you go to. Some are very close to Reform while others are very close to Orthodox. The Conservative movement broke ties with the Reform movement when the latter rejected Jewish law, ritual, the idea of a Jewish people, etc. (Some of these positions have been officially reversed in the Reform movement).

Conservative Judaism is halakhic Judaism, although not the same as Orthodox. In the Conservative movement, prior halakhic decisions and traditions carry less weight in modern rulings and there is a plurality of responsas offered for the same issue. Congregations and individual Jews are able to follow any they choose, with some choosing the more traditional stances and others choosing the liberal.

Typically, in Conservative Judaism you're going to find more equality between the sexes than you will in Orthodoxy, and more adherence to ritual than you will in Reform. But, overall, Conservative Judaism is generally closer to Reform than Orthodoxy (but you'll find individual Jews all over the spectrum).
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Old 07-14-2013, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
umm... yoke
:-D The visual of "yolk" of heaven gave me a chuckle.
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Originally Posted by JB from NC View Post
It's really going to vary by which synagogue you go to. Some are very close to Reform while others are very close to Orthodox. The Conservative movement broke ties with the Reform movement when the latter rejected Jewish law, ritual, the idea of a Jewish people, etc. (Some of these positions have been officially reversed in the Reform movement).

Conservative Judaism is halakhic Judaism, although not the same as Orthodox. In the Conservative movement, prior halakhic decisions and traditions carry less weight in modern rulings and there is a plurality of responsas offered for the same issue. Congregations and individual Jews are able to follow any they choose, with some choosing the more traditional stances and others choosing the liberal.

Typically, in Conservative Judaism you're going to find more equality between the sexes than you will in Orthodoxy, and more adherence to ritual than you will in Reform. But, overall, Conservative Judaism is generally closer to Reform than Orthodoxy (but you'll find individual Jews all over the spectrum).
This is what I am looking for. I think personalities are very different and that leads to different understanding of the texts. I am very uncomfortable with a hard line interpretation that doesn't allow for progression as times change, which I have alluded to comments on previous threads.

Unfortunately both of the Conservative shuls in this area are about a 25 minute drive. I didn't know it until yesterday but I live walking distance to the Chabad. But it's not the one I was really interested in going to. I have talked to the Rabbi at the Chabad 20 minutes away and I really like him. He's older and has raised his children, which is important to me.
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Long Island
1,711 posts, read 1,385,393 times
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Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
This is what I am looking for. I think personalities are very different and that leads to different understanding of the texts. I am very uncomfortable with a hard line interpretation that doesn't allow for progression as times change, which I have alluded to comments on previous threads.
The Conservative movement certainly allows for that.

Quote:
Unfortunately both of the Conservative shuls in this area are about a 25 minute drive. I didn't know it until yesterday but I live walking distance to the Chabad. But it's not the one I was really interested in going to. I have talked to the Rabbi at the Chabad 20 minutes away and I really like him. He's older and has raised his children, which is important to me.
It could be worse. We have a single synagogue (it happens to be Conservative) that serves a huge chunk of south-central NC. It's a half-hour drive for me. The next closest is an hour and a half away in Raleigh.
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