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Old 09-13-2013, 11:19 AM
 
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What time will all of you break your fast tomorrow night? Do you check for the proscribed halachic time to end your fast, or is it when the bagels and lox arrives? When I was younger, we never heard of a specific time the fast would end. So we would just "call it over" whenever we felt.
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Old 09-13-2013, 01:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
That could be a problem for Christians because they don't think of Yom Kippur as a New Year any more than Jews think of December 25 as Christmas.

How about "Happy Holidays", which is what many Jews say to Christians around December 25?
I don't think "Happy Holidays" is an appropriate greeting for Yom Kipper. The most appropriate greeting is "Have an Easy Fast". Some people also wish one that they "may be inscribed in the book of life".

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Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
What time will all of you break your fast tomorrow night? Do you check for the proscribed halachic time to end your fast, or is it when the bagels and lox arrives? When I was younger, we never heard of a specific time the fast would end. So we would just "call it over" whenever we felt.
People that go to synagogue break the fast after they return home. Otherwise, the appropriate time is after dark when one can see at least 3 stars close together in the sky.
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Old 09-13-2013, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
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Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I don't think "Happy Holidays" is an appropriate greeting for Yom Kipper.
Heck, a lot of the Christians I know do not think it is an appropriate greeting for Christmas, but they accept it anyway. It is the thought that counts.
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Old 09-13-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
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I must be funny. I don't want my Christian neighbors telling me to be inscribed upon the book of life, or to have a meaningful fast. I like to keep it simple and am thrilled if someone remembers our New Year. (As a side note, everyone wants to make a huge deal over Hanukkah, which is minor and not a "Jewish Christmas". It's something they understand, though, or can relate to).

However, it's all in the intent. A well meaning person wished me a Happy Yom Kippur today and I was touched by the gesture. She meant well.

Have a meaningful fast, everyone.
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Old 09-13-2013, 02:58 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
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Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
Heck, a lot of the Christians I know do not think it is an appropriate greeting for Christmas, but they accept it anyway. It is the thought that counts.
Exactly.
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Old 09-13-2013, 03:00 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
What time will all of you break your fast tomorrow night? Do you check for the proscribed halachic time to end your fast, or is it when the bagels and lox arrives? When I was younger, we never heard of a specific time the fast would end. So we would just "call it over" whenever we felt.
If I'd call it over whenever I felt, I'd be having late morning coffee and a snack. I wait for sundown. I'm sure that's not halachically the way it's done, but it has to be dark out (usually about 25 hours). When I first started being interest in Judaism, I went somewhere that broke the fast at 3 when services were over. Boy, I thought that was tough!

Doing what I call "waterloading" now......
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Old 09-13-2013, 03:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1+1=5 View Post
I must be funny. I don't want my Christian neighbors telling me to be inscribed upon the book of life, or to have a meaningful fast. I like to keep it simple and am thrilled if someone remembers our New Year. (As a side note, everyone wants to make a huge deal over Hanukkah, which is minor and not a "Jewish Christmas". It's something they understand, though, or can relate to).

However, it's all in the intent. A well meaning person wished me a Happy Yom Kippur today and I was touched by the gesture. She meant well.

Have a meaningful fast, everyone.
Agreed on all points.

G'mar chasima tova, Chana.
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Old 09-14-2013, 07:37 PM
 
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Thanks for all of your replies. You don't know about things until you ask right? I wish all of you a Happy New Year
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
Heck, a lot of the Christians I know do not think it is an appropriate greeting for Christmas, but they accept it anyway. It is the thought that counts.
I can accept "Happy Yom Kipper" from a non-Jew but "Happy Holidays" really would be strange for Yom Kipper.
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:57 AM
 
32,213 posts, read 33,119,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1+1=5 View Post
If I'd call it over whenever I felt, I'd be having late morning coffee and a snack. I wait for sundown. I'm sure that's not halachically the way it's done, but it has to be dark out (usually about 25 hours). When I first started being interest in Judaism, I went somewhere that broke the fast at 3 when services were over. Boy, I thought that was tough!

Doing what I call "waterloading" now......
The fast is approx. 25 hours. As said after sundown or similar to a Shabbat when 3 stars appear close together in the sky is when it is time to break the fast.
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