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Old 04-08-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Long Island
1,725 posts, read 1,391,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
Kinda like Christianity has done to theirselves...
What Christians do has nothing to do with this sub-forum or this thread.

Do you have anything relevant to add on the topic of Askenazi and Sephardic communities?
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Old 04-08-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
10,513 posts, read 10,339,262 times
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I may not have anything to offer on the subject of this thread in particular but if I may be allowed and I do not wish to offend as I am unfamiliar with your customs and as the title of your thread has caught my attention I wish to ask a question to those who may know. I am curious as to how the Jewish community is going to look upon those who have looked into DNA and have gotten results back and say that they are either Askenazi or Sephardic or both in their DNA and have decided to use that information to possibly convert to Judaism. This study of DNA may cause some complications among the normal public in this country. I being of Native American ancestry have done both DNA testing with 23andMe and Ancestry.com and have come back with results that show that I have a certain percentage of both. Now I have no desire to convert to Judaism because of these results, however I do find it rather curious when I look back at the history of not only my Native American ancestors but of my European ones as well.again I do not wish to impose or offend anybody, I am merely curious as to how this would be handled within the Jewish community. osay
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Old 04-08-2014, 11:09 AM
 
864 posts, read 734,405 times
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Quote:
I am curious as to how the Jewish community is going to look upon those who have looked into DNA and have gotten results back and say that they are either Askenazi or Sephardic or both in their DNA and have decided to use that information to possibly convert to Judaism.
DNA has no bearing whatsoever in the conversion process. Conversion boils down to taking on the obligations of a Jew.
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Old 04-08-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Long Island
1,725 posts, read 1,391,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptsum View Post
I may not have anything to offer on the subject of this thread in particular but if I may be allowed and I do not wish to offend as I am unfamiliar with your customs and as the title of your thread has caught my attention I wish to ask a question to those who may know. I am curious as to how the Jewish community is going to look upon those who have looked into DNA and have gotten results back and say that they are either Askenazi or Sephardic or both in their DNA and have decided to use that information to possibly convert to Judaism. This study of DNA may cause some complications among the normal public in this country. I being of Native American ancestry have done both DNA testing with 23andMe and Ancestry.com and have come back with results that show that I have a certain percentage of both. Now I have no desire to convert to Judaism because of these results, however I do find it rather curious when I look back at the history of not only my Native American ancestors but of my European ones as well.again I do not wish to impose or offend anybody, I am merely curious as to how this would be handled within the Jewish community. osay
Like iwish stated, DNA doesn't really factor into it. For being considered Jewish, your mother must be Jewish; if you have to rely on a DNA test to tell you that you have Jewish ancestry, then you're going to need a halachic conversion.

As far as traditions go, you keep your family's. If your family is Ashkenazi, then you follow Ashkenazi tradition. If your family is Sephardic (or Mizrahi), you do the same. For converts, we typically adopt the majority tradition of our community.
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Old 04-08-2014, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,263,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptsum View Post
I may not have anything to offer on the subject of this thread in particular but if I may be allowed and I do not wish to offend as I am unfamiliar with your customs and as the title of your thread has caught my attention I wish to ask a question to those who may know. I am curious as to how the Jewish community is going to look upon those who have looked into DNA and have gotten results back and say that they are either Askenazi or Sephardic or both in their DNA and have decided to use that information to possibly convert to Judaism. This study of DNA may cause some complications among the normal public in this country. I being of Native American ancestry have done both DNA testing with 23andMe and Ancestry.com and have come back with results that show that I have a certain percentage of both. Now I have no desire to convert to Judaism because of these results, however I do find it rather curious when I look back at the history of not only my Native American ancestors but of my European ones as well.again I do not wish to impose or offend anybody, I am merely curious as to how this would be handled within the Jewish community. osay
The test for Jewishness is simple: an unbroken maternal Jewish ancestry.

You can be 63/64ths Jewish, but if the wrong great-great-great-greatgrandmother isn't Jewish, then you're not Jewish at all and need to undergo the same conversion ritual as somebody who has 0 Jewish ancestors.

Likewise, you can be 63/64th non-Jewish in ancestry, but if the right great-great-great-greatgrandmother is Jewish, then you're 100% Jewish, as Jewish as the Chief Rabbis of Israel.

Finding documentation that will satisfy Orthodox Jews of your ancestry is another story.


In an attempt to keep this post on topic, an interesting fact is that which minhagim (customs) you follow depend on your father's minhag and not your mother's. Therefore if your mother is Ashkenazi but father is Sephardic, you may chow down on rice krispies during Pesach!
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:00 PM
 
Location: OC/LA
3,831 posts, read 3,707,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
The test for Jewishness is simple: an unbroken maternal Jewish ancestry.

You can be 63/64ths Jewish, but if the wrong great-great-great-greatgrandmother isn't Jewish, then you're not Jewish at all and need to undergo the same conversion ritual as somebody who has 0 Jewish ancestors.

Likewise, you can be 63/64th non-Jewish in ancestry, but if the right great-great-great-greatgrandmother is Jewish, then you're 100% Jewish, as Jewish as the Chief Rabbis of Israel.
Thankfully this is not true in reform. So long as you are raised in a Jewish household so long as one of your parents is Jewish then you're Jewish.
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,263,221 times
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Originally Posted by HyperionGap View Post
Thankfully this is not true in reform. So long as you are raised in a Jewish household so long as one of your parents is Jewish then you're Jewish.
This is only true in one country: The United States. The tiny Reform movement in other countries like the UK, Canada, and Israel require a person born of a non-Jewish mother to convert. And patrilineality is not universally accepted by all Reform rabbis in the U.S. For example the local Reform rabbi, who leans Conservative on many issues, wants such people to be converted.
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Long Island
1,725 posts, read 1,391,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
This is only true in one country: The United States. The tiny Reform movement in other countries like the UK, Canada, and Israel require a person born of a non-Jewish mother to convert. And patrilineality is not universally accepted by all Reform rabbis in the U.S. For example the local Reform rabbi, who leans Conservative on many issues, wants such people to be converted.
I've spoken to several rabbis who include a trip to the mikvah and beit din as part of the bar/bat mitzvah class to remove all doubt in the future.
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
10,513 posts, read 10,339,262 times
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I thank you for your responses and for the courtesy that you have accorded me. I believe it is always good to learn about others cultural beliefs and traditions in order to better understand and not be offensive.osay
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Old 04-08-2014, 01:22 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 4,051,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
In Israel there is a problem with the acceptance of all types of conversion to Judaism. Several times the Ultra-Orthodox political parties have tried to change the "Law of Return" of Jewish immigration to Israel so that it will state that converted Jews will be accepted if they converted according to the "HALACHA" or based only by an Orthodox conversion. That would be the reason that an Israeli would suggest that you don't emphasize that you are a convert.

I have heard that too, that Israel has issues with people that convert to Judaism. How come they do~? Is it the ultra Orthodox that has the issues with it~? I know someone, who recently told me she is moving to Israel. She has converted in the past years and lives like the ultra Orthodox. So, what issues will she have there when she goes~? Just curious.
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