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Old 02-04-2014, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,805 times
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Glossary:

posek: Decisor of Jewish law
madrega: spiritual level
shul: Yiddish for synagogue
Shulchan Aruch (literally: "Set table" in Hebrew): a compendium of Jewish law written by Rabbi Yosef Caro in the 16th century, the most widely consulted code of Jewish law
Mishna Berurah (literally: "clarified teaching" in Hebrew): a compendium of Jewish Law written by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan in the 19th century that includes opinions of rabbis since the Shulchan Aruch was written. It is mainly used by Ashkenazi Orthodox Jews.
klal yisrael: the community of Jews as a whole
sh'aila: a question about Jewish law
to kasher: to make ovens, pots, or silverware suitable for use with kosher food
yiddishkeit: a Yiddish word for Judaism

Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Got it.

In order to be a superior posek, it's preferable to be a shul "pulpit" rabbi. There's simply too many "real world" scenarios that must be considered, and if one poskined solely from the Shulchan Orech or Mishna Bereura, k'lal yisroel would be poorly served.

A good example, is when I moved into my current house 3 or 4 years ago, I asked a shaila and was told I needed to dispose of my dishwasher and have it replaced entirely. The house I moved into 10 years before that, I asked a shaila and was told I could kasher the dishwasher by running it on the hottest cycle, with lots of detergents, etc.

So are these competing psaks? Of course not - there's only one Daas Torah. My madrega was in an entirely different place 13 years ago from where it was just 3 years ago, and the posek factored that into his decision. Did he alter halacha to give me the answer I needed to hear? No way. There are a range of respected opinions on the subject of kashering a dishwasher. He simply found an opinion 13 years ago that was in the range (albeit far far outside of the norm) that would allow me not to outright violate halacha, and yet not get too discouraged if given a psak I might have been unable to perform, and thereby put my fledgling yiddishkite in jeopardy.

I think this same dynamic applies to the question in the OP.
I'm wondering about this "far far outside the norm" deal. Wouldn't you have been distancing yourself from the Jewish community you were part of by following the psak from 13 to 14 years ago? Did you let people who were eating "by you" know that you followed this psak, and were they okay with the kashrut of your food?
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Old 02-04-2014, 03:15 PM
 
3,964 posts, read 3,347,521 times
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Great questions, Usario. When we were given the option to kasher our dishwasher, we were indeed told it would not be considered sufficient by the majority of Jews who ate at our house. For that reason, we became paperware freaks. When we moved and bought a new dishwasher, some may consider it a chumra, but this chumra of buying a new dishwasher brought us tremendous joy, feeling confident we could invite friends with the highest level of kashrus to come eat by us.
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,376 posts, read 24,137,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
Glossary:

sh'aila: a question about Jewish law
to kasher: to make ovens, pots, or silverware suitable for use with kosher food
yiddishkeit: a Yiddish word for Judaism
Slight correction to Glossary:

shay'ila (correct Hebrew pronunciation) : a question (shay'ilot is questions)
kasher ("to" part is English): make ovens, pots, or silverware suitable for use with kosher food
yiddishkeit: a Yiddish word for Orthodox European Jews
yidden: a Yiddish word for Jews in general (lantzman means nearly the same, but goes a step further to mean
fellow Jews)
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Old 02-04-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,376 posts, read 24,137,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Here was this past week's:

A non religious Jewish man is sitting with his father on his father's death bed. His father's dying request of his son is that he say Kaddish every day for a year, in shul in a minyan, when he passes away. The father then passes away.
Since the tradition calls for it to be done only for 11 months, then requesting 12 months usually meant the father was one evil SOB TOJ that required extra purification.


FWIW: Secular Jews who've never had a Yeshiva education (or something similar) commonly would not know that as part of tradition it is stated daily for 11 months daily in a minyan.

Since the Kaddish is not stated in relation to death, then wouldn't the fathers request for it to be done per his death be a violation and thus void? Its stated to reaffirm ones own belief in G_d and not in relation to the actual death. Thus your following assumptions and posts would be possibly moot.
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,299,862 times
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Reminder to all.

As all readers of these threads may not familiar with Hebrew or Yiddish be certain to place the English meaning in Parenthesis after each non-English word.

The TOS does state English only. To fully comply with this we all need to be more mindful to give the English meaning even for common terms.

While my personal preference is to use the appropriate terms in a religious forum, we must be mindful that what is the norm for one person may be foreign to another.

"Be up to date, translate"
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MODERATOR OF: Buddhism: Judaism: Paganism:

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Old 02-05-2014, 10:49 AM
 
3,964 posts, read 3,347,521 times
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The father asked him to say the Kaddish prayer for 11 months. Availus (the period of mourning and all it's restrictions) is what lasts 12 months.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,376 posts, read 24,137,102 times
Reputation: 8872
Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
The father asked him to say the Kaddish prayer for 11 months. Availus (the period of mourning and all it's restrictions) is what lasts 12 months.
Not what you typed:


Quote:
...His father's dying request of his son is that he say Kaddish every day for a year...
And that's what you pulled out of the comment?
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Old 03-23-2014, 07:44 AM
 
3,964 posts, read 3,347,521 times
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Interesting Halacha class Friday might at shul. The question was this:

Reuven is walking thru town and is handing out mezuzas to all the Jewish home owners and Jewish owned businesses. He comes across Shimon, the local butcher, who has been warned many times to stop selling pork products in his butcher shop.

Reuven decides to skip Shimon's store and keeps walking. Shimon sees he's been skipped and comes out of his shop (that sells treif food to Jews) and asks if he could have a mezuza.

Reuven is unsure what to do? His concern is putting a mezuza on a door of a Jewish owned business that openly promotes an anti Torah life.

So he did what any proper Yid should do. He asked a shaila of his Rav. How would you have decided?
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Old 03-23-2014, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
4,609 posts, read 4,117,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
How would you have decided?
Be very friendly to Shimon and give him a mezuza.

Even if we find flaws in the behavior of a person, we should focus on the good parts of their character and hope they will someday see the errors of their ways and become a better person.

If we treat people with respect, maybe their behavior will become more worthy of respect.

Besides, you should not go around putting mezuzas on people's doors without their permission. It is fine to hand it to them in person, but not to attach it to their door.

Last edited by hiker45; 03-23-2014 at 08:20 AM..
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Old 03-23-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: OC/LA
3,831 posts, read 3,705,842 times
Reputation: 2214
Give him one.
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