U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality > Judaism
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-10-2014, 08:28 PM
 
61 posts, read 56,727 times
Reputation: 28

Advertisements

I have been really getting into Zionism these last 12 months and it has come to my attention that anti-Israel political groups such as Jstreet and Jewish Voice For Peace were started by people from the Reform movement. This absolutely disgusts me so I have decided to leave Reform and I am now considering to upgrade to an Orthodox or Conservative Shul.

I still want to check out a modern orthodox Shul, but so far I am really impressed with the Chabad center that is right down the street from me. Their form of Judaism seems authentic and I really wish I could understand what was going on during the services. Man, they read Hebrew fast!! And they mumble a lot!!! However, they are really nice people. The rabbi and his wife had me over for Shabbos dinner after service.

Last week I checked out a conservative shul that was within walking distance of my home. I liked that I was able to easily follow the service since the Chazzan read Hebrew at a much slower pace than the Chabad Chazzan. Plus they actually announced page numbers; I wish Chabad did this more often. However, their form of Judaism didn't seem authentic. This was definitely an Ashkenazi community, but there were 16 year-old unmarried boys wearing tallits. Also, there were many women wearing tallits and kippahs. Why do women want to wear these garments meant for men? It's weird and they look proud wearing it.

It's obvious that my Hebrew reading skills are good enough for this Conservative Shul but not the Chabad one. Should I join the conservative shul for a year since I can understand most of what's going on during Shabbat service and then upgrade to Orthodox? Should I join Chabad and be totally lost until someone offers to help me? Or should I go check out a modern orthodox shul?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-10-2014, 08:50 PM
 
864 posts, read 733,797 times
Reputation: 251
I'm assuming you're Jewish, right. So why don't you introduce yourself to the chabad Rabbi and ask him to help you with Hebrew classes (oh, you already did). Even without lessons, after attending chabad or a modern orthodox shul for several weeks, its customs will become familiar to you and you won't feel so "totally lost." Your Hebrew reading will improve, as will your knowledge about Judaism. Try chabad for a year.

I would think both chabad and modern orthodox have the same feel, but Chabad is more geared towards newbies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2014, 09:01 PM
 
3,962 posts, read 3,343,362 times
Reputation: 1246
Strange OP. No offense, but your story is a bit off. Zionism tends to lead people towards Reform Judaism, not away from it.

Tell us more about your background. My Jewish sniffer says something is awry here. Maybe if we knew more about where you're coming from, your story would make more sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2014, 09:09 PM
 
864 posts, read 733,797 times
Reputation: 251
Quote:
Zionism tends to lead people towards Reform Judaism, not away from it.
Not so. TFF. Reform is totally left wing politically.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2014, 09:14 PM
 
3,962 posts, read 3,343,362 times
Reputation: 1246
Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
Not so. TFF. Reform is totally left wing politically.
And Zionism is totally godless and left wing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 05:11 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,727 times
Reputation: 28
TFF, my Zionism sniffer says something is off from your knowledge of Zionism. It appears you have no idea about right-wing Zionist parties in Israel, like Likud.

Anyway, I was born and raised reform by my parents. After realizing last year that the reform movement is responsible for creating anti-Israel groups within the Jewish community, I had to leave this looney left-wing movement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Long Island
1,720 posts, read 1,387,828 times
Reputation: 1412
My suggestion would be to attend each for a while (several months). Get a feel for the service and community, talk to the rabbi, and just get to know the people.

Then stick with the one that is the best fit for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 08:13 AM
 
864 posts, read 733,797 times
Reputation: 251
Quote:
And Zionism is totally godless and left wing.
But it's not reform's type of godlessness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,261,717 times
Reputation: 760
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo1234 View Post
I have been really getting into Zionism these last 12 months and it has come to my attention that anti-Israel political groups such as Jstreet and Jewish Voice For Peace were started by people from the Reform movement. This absolutely disgusts me so I have decided to leave Reform and I am now considering to upgrade to an Orthodox or Conservative Shul.
Important points:
- Not all Reform Jews are anti-Israel. In fact the official position of the Reform movement is Zionist. See ARZA. Just because most people in J Street may be Reform doesn't mean that most Reform Jews approve of J Street.
- Many of the secular Zionists that founded the State of Israel were not religious at all, including David Ben Gurion, Golda Meir, and Theodor Herzl.
- As I'm sure our Orthodox regulars TFF and iwishiwerethin will agree: The Conservative Movement's positions on Zionism are not very different from that of Reform, and the same goes for the beliefs and attitudes of their congregants. This may be different outside of the U.S. like in the UK or Canada. You'll see a big jump in the political, social, and religious views of congregants between Reform/Conservative and Orthodox. The most passionate religious Zionists tend to be Modern Orthodox Jews in the U.S., "dati leumi" (National Religious) Jews in Israel, and right-wing Conservative Jews in places like Canada and the UK.
- There are many groups of ultra-Orthodox Jews who are strongly anti-Israel, who believe that Jews should not be establishing their own state before the Messiah (Mashiach) comes.
- before you think of joining an Orthodox synagogue or organization, can you confirm that your mother (and her mother) was born Jewish? If not, there's no point in trying to join. You can be a non-Jewish ally of Jews but that's about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 11:07 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,727 times
Reputation: 28
^yes, my mother was born jewish, her mother was born jewish, and her mother was born jewish.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality > Judaism
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top