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Old 02-12-2014, 06:59 PM
 
61 posts, read 56,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
All of the above could easily be orthodox.

All hair covered (orthodox)
Hair partially covered (modern orthodox)
Hair uncovered (everything else)

Sefardic women with uncovered hair are also sometimes orthodox. So I dunno. I stick by the Shomer Shabbos test.
Chasidic women do not wear mini skirts. Some may wear shorter skirts, maybe 2-4 inches below their knees, but did you notice that they usually wear tall boots to cover up their legs? Or is it just because of the winter season?

Also, orthodox women who wear mini skirts, aren't they considered "liberal orthodox"? Finally, does modern orthodox have a generic set of rules on how women and men should dress?
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:18 PM
 
864 posts, read 734,210 times
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Quote:
Also, orthodox women who wear mini skirts, aren't they considered "liberal orthodox"? F
Orthodox women who wear mini skirts are just being "modern" even if not modern orthodox.

Quote:
inally, does modern orthodox have a generic set of rules on how women and men should dress?
Modern orthodox women wear ankle length skirts (way longer than the Mrs. Black hatters), tighter T-shirts, lower necklines, and hair partially uncovered.

Quote:
Chasidic women do not wear mini skirts
No, they don't. But orthodox covers a large spectrum, not only chasidic.
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,805 times
Reputation: 760
What are the boundaries of authentic Judaism? I.e. would you trust the kashrut, eidut, and gerut of the rabbis of the following movements:
- Conservative Judaism
- Masorti / Conservadox Judaism, which does not allow driving of any kind on Shabbat, there's separate seating of men and women but no mechitzah, women can't be shaliach hatzibur, openly gay people can't be rabbis, etc.
- Open Orthodoxy of Avi Weiss, Asher Lopatin, Dov Linzer, et. al.
- the faction of Chabad that believes Menachem Mendel Schneerson is the Living Messiah

Glossary for fresh "baal teshuvah" 's:
- kashrut: the kosherness of food
- eidut: legal testimony
- gerut: conversion
- mechitzah: the divider between the men and women's section of a synagogue
- shaliach hatzibur (literally: "emissary of the community"): the leader of ritual prayers. Like imams in Sunni Islam, it is not an ordained position.
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Old 02-12-2014, 08:12 PM
 
7,378 posts, read 6,735,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo1234 View Post
As I start my journey towards REAL Judaism, orthodox, I thought I should discuss why I left this movement. Please feel free to ask me any questions!!! Reform is a great place to start but it's only Judaism light with 0 calories.

I will be meeting with a Chabad rabbi soon and we will start my journey with the Mitzvah of Tefillin.
Why do Jews celebrate Passover, when so many innocent Egyptians supposedly died and caused so much sorrow for their families, and all because God hardened Pharaoh's heart?
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Old 02-13-2014, 12:47 AM
 
546 posts, read 567,430 times
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I'm happy that you've found the stream of Judaism that's right for you, but please...drop that holier than thou attitude that you've found the "real Judaism."

I'm in my 60s and am a proud, weekly temple-going, Shabbat candle-lighting, third-generation Reform Jew. There hasn't been an Orthodox Jew in my family since my great-grandparents. At one time, all three of our generations belonged to the same temple-- and attended.

My husband's mother--the products of two Orthodox parents--had 1 sister and 2 brothers. Out of those 4 siblings, only a single one remained Orthodox. One became Conservative, and the other two never went to temple. Judaism is a big tent, and whatever's right for YOU, is right for you.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:08 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LagunaMom View Post
I'm happy that you've found the stream of Judaism that's right for you, but please...drop that holier than thou attitude that you've found the "real Judaism."
There's only one stream of Judaism that is correct and that's orthodox.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LagunaMom View Post
I'm in my 60s and am a proud, weekly temple-going, Shabbat candle-lighting, third-generation Reform Jew. There hasn't been an Orthodox Jew in my family since my great-grandparents. At one time, all three of our generations belonged to the same temple-- and attended.
My fellow Reform sister, search your heart, listen to what your Reform rabbi talks about; he/she is probably liberal, right? Please try to realize that your movement, my former movement, is creating a lot of problems for us Jews worldwide. Are you okay with these horrible political groups, Jstreet and JVP, that have been created from your movement?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LagunaMom View Post
My husband's mother--the products of two Orthodox parents--had 1 sister and 2 brothers. Out of those 4 siblings, only a single one remained Orthodox. One became Conservative, and the other two never went to temple. Judaism is a big tent, and whatever's right for YOU, is right for you.
Judaism is a big tent only because of people born to a Jewish mother. We are very lucky to be called Jews, since many of us don't practice orthodox.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:14 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
What are the boundaries of authentic Judaism? I.e. would you trust the kashrut, eidut, and gerut of the rabbis of the following movements:
- Conservative Judaism
No, not anymore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
- Masorti / Conservadox Judaism, which does not allow driving of any kind on Shabbat, there's separate seating of men and women but no mechitzah, women can't be shaliach hatzibur, openly gay people can't be rabbis, etc.
Maybe. Also, I have gay people in my family, but it isn't a big concern to me. I honestly care more about the safety of Israel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
- Open Orthodoxy of Avi Weiss, Asher Lopatin, Dov Linzer, et. al.
Is this the new conservative movement thing? i don't know much about this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
- the faction of Chabad that believes Menachem Mendel Schneerson is the Living Messiah
Mendel is not the messiah.
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: OC/LA
3,831 posts, read 3,705,842 times
Reputation: 2214
Quote:
Originally Posted by LagunaMom View Post
I'm happy that you've found the stream of Judaism that's right for you, but please...drop that holier than thou attitude that you've found the "real Judaism."

I'm in my 60s and am a proud, weekly temple-going, Shabbat candle-lighting, third-generation Reform Jew. There hasn't been an Orthodox Jew in my family since my great-grandparents. At one time, all three of our generations belonged to the same temple-- and attended.

My husband's mother--the products of two Orthodox parents--had 1 sister and 2 brothers. Out of those 4 siblings, only a single one remained Orthodox. One became Conservative, and the other two never went to temple. Judaism is a big tent, and whatever's right for YOU, is right for you.
Lagunamom that sounds like a very nice way to be Jewish and actually the majority of Jews in the US are reform so you don't have to feel you need to defend yourself from anyone or change your practices. However, you're probably wasting your time talking to these BT born agains. The thing that's hilarious about this one is his reason for doing it is the most asinine thing ever.

Whenever anyone agrees with something to the effect of "-If there is a conflict between current science and the Torah, the Torah always comes first" you know you've encountered a fundie and it's going to be like speaking to a Neanderthal.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:08 AM
 
864 posts, read 734,210 times
Reputation: 251
Quote:
Lagunamom that sounds like a very nice way to be Jewish and actually the majority of Jews in the US are reform so you don't have to feel you need to defend yourself from anyone or change your practices.
Why stop with Jews? Since the majority of the world population are Muslims, convert to Islam.\

Quote:
I'm in my 60s and am a proud, weekly temple-going, Shabbat candle-lighting, third-generation Reform Jew.
The question to ask yourself.... Will my great-grandchildren still be Jews.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,805 times
Reputation: 760
What do you think of Reform Zionists like the members of ARZA and most Reform Jews in Canada and the UK?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo1234 View Post
There's only one stream of Judaism that is correct and that's orthodox.
How do you know this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo1234 View Post
Maybe. Also, I have gay people in my family, but it isn't a big concern to me. I honestly care more about the safety of Israel.
Would you attend a same sex wedding of a family member or a wedding between one of your family members and a non-Jew? What if the gay family member or non-Jew had a strong Jewish identity and observance (just not to Orthodox levels, obviously)?

Remember, attending such events is strictly forbidden by mainstream Orthodox authorities.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo1234
Mendel is not the messiah.

That's not what I'm asking. What do you think of the authenticity of the Judaism of Chabad rabbis who believe (secretly or otherwise) that Menachem Mendel Schneerson is the Living Messiah (ask your rabbi if he has ever said: "yechi adoneinu moreinu v'rabeinu, melech hamoshiach l'olam vaed"), that although he died in 1994, the tomb is empty.
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