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Old 02-23-2014, 07:10 PM
 
864 posts, read 733,948 times
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Quote:
Thanks for proving my point.
I don't know what point I proved, as I didn't bother reading the whole Megilla you posted. In any case, you're happy, so it's a good thing.
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
4,609 posts, read 4,115,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
I'm more annoyed by chabadniks displaying Menoras alongside crosses in public places.
What's a 'chabadnik'?
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin
Well, Chanuka is a really important holiday for us, and all our holidays are religious, but placing a Menora next to a cross demeans the menorah and everything it represents.
If you ask the average non-Jew or non-observant Jew what the most important Jewish holidays were, they would name Passover, Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashana and Chanukah. Most would not have heard of Shavuot and Sukkot. I think that's what Tikva's point was.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
What's a 'chabadnik'?
A member of a certain Hasidic group, Chabad-Lubavitch, famous for promoting Judaism among secular and non-Orthodox Jews in an effort to bring about the messianic age.

Also:
megillah: literally: scroll. Several short books in the Tanakh are called Megillot (plural of megillah). It's also a Jewish English word used to mean "a long story".
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Lake Worth, FL
388 posts, read 316,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
I think that's what Tikva's point was.
Exactly. Thanks.
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Old 03-04-2014, 11:35 AM
 
12 posts, read 19,837 times
Reputation: 11
Default American jewish photographers

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
In the other forum, we were discussing a possible new law in Arizona that would make it easier for a business to refuse service if performing that service would be against their religious principles. I made this post:

Do my questions make any sense to you or is there a reason why an Orthodox Jew would never work as a photographer?

What are your answers to my questions?
The best photographers of America are jews. Hellen levitt, Diane Arbus, Annie Leibovitz, Nan Goldin, Linda McCartney, Man Ray, Joe Rosenthal (of the image "Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima", taken during the Battle of Iwo Jima), Aaron Siskind, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Richard Avedon, Gerry Winogrand, Robert Frank, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Mitch Epstein, and Steve Rosenfield. They are probably not orthodox jews, but non the less very jewish and photography is a jewish profession and business in the USA.

In New York city the largest and best photography stores are in the hands of orthodox jews.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

http://www.adorama.com/Photography


Adorama store New York


B&H store New York
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Old 03-04-2014, 11:58 AM
 
12 posts, read 19,837 times
Reputation: 11
Judaism has no objection to photography or other forms of two-dimensional art, and depictions of humans can be seen in religious books such as the Passover Haggadah, as well as children's books about biblical and historical personages.

But Halakha ("Jewish law") as taught by the Shulkhan Arukh ("Code of Jewish Law") and still practiced and applied by Orthodox Judaism today, interprets the verses as prohibiting the creation of certain types of graven images of people, angels, or astronomical bodies, whether or not they are actually used as idols. The Shulkhan Arukh states: "It is forbidden to make complete solid or raised images of people or angels, or any images of heavenly bodies except for purposes of study". ("Heavenly bodies" are included here because the stars and planets were worshipped by some religions in human forms. Astronomical models for scientific purposes are permitted under the category of "study.")

In both Hasidic and Orthodox Judaism, taking photographs or filming are forbidden on the Sabbath and Jewish holy days, but this prohibition has nothing to do with idolatry. Rather, it is related to the prohibition against working or creating on these days.

Many traditional Jews still follow the prohibitions against entering places of idolatry, and will not attend functions held in buildings where there are religious statues. So probably Orthodox-Jewish photographers will not take images of Roman-Catholic, Hindu or Buddhist marriages. But they easily could go to a Calvinist (Presbyterian), Muslim or secular wedding without images or idolatry.
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Old 03-04-2014, 03:42 PM
 
3,964 posts, read 3,345,152 times
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No fear of idolatry from the Muslims. They pray to same (one) G-d that we Jews pray to. Lots of debate what god(s) the Chrstians are praying to.
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:34 AM
 
Location: NYC
36 posts, read 28,424 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
No fear of idolatry from the Muslims. They pray to same (one) G-d that we Jews pray to. to.
Moderator cut: No Non-English untranslated words Try screaming it to them the next time they are "fulfilling jihad" on Jews.

Last edited by Mightyqueen801; 01-08-2019 at 09:56 PM..
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