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Old 03-05-2014, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
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Would a Christian prayer be welcome at a Jewish funeral?

Years ago, I recall an important person (maybe John Kennedy) lying in state in the U.S. Capitol and people were lined up to walk by his coffin. There were marshals there to keep the crowd moving smoothly. One person stopped and said a Jewish prayer over his body. Even though Kennedy was Catholic, no one was offended and they let the man finish his prayer.

Would a Catholic be equally well received at a Jewish funeral if he stood over the casket, made the sign of a cross, and said a short prayer?
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:56 AM
 
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Would a Christian prayer be welcome at a Jewish funeral?
No way. Christianity is idolatry and any display of idol worship would make any Jew jump out of his grave. Did you really not know the answer to this question?
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Lake Worth, FL
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What does that have to do with my question?

If the atheist has questions, he should start his own thread.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiker45 View Post
Would a Catholic be equally well received at a Jewish funeral if he stood over the casket, made the sign of a cross, and said a short prayer?
It depends on how religious the Jews were. The sign of the cross is a definite no. Saying a silent prayer is not usually an issue at a extremely secular funeral. But keep in mind for some reason people become more sensitive to their religion during a few certain occasions (birth, death, marriage, bar/bat mitzvah, Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, Passover to name a few).
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Originally Posted by Tikva View Post
What does that have to do with my question?

If the atheist has questions, he should start his own thread.
Once the funeral has passed, what direction would you like for this thread to go into?


Keep in mind that per your original post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikva View Post
... Anything I should know ...
Is going to garnish questions in relation to Jewish funerals.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
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Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
Did you really not know the answer to this question?
Nope.
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Old 03-05-2014, 11:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
It depends on how religious the Jews were. The sign of the cross is a definite no. Saying a silent prayer is not usually an issue at a extremely secular funeral. But keep in mind for some reason people become more sensitive to their religion during a few certain occasions (birth, death, marriage, bar/bat mitzvah, Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, Passover to name a few).
That's all very true.

My brother is as secular as it comes. He married a non Jew, goes to church (but swears he does not believe in Yushke). He has an Xmas tree. But when my father was dying last year, he insisted we have Shabbos dinner by my father's bedside, even though my father was comatose.
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Old 03-05-2014, 03:15 PM
 
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Would a Christian prayer be welcome at a Jewish funeral?
I can't see how there would even be an opportunity for one. Even attendees at the funeral don't say prayers. They respectfully listen to eulogies and ask forgiveness from the deceased silently. Only close family goes out to the cemetery for burial and to say Kaddish.
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Old 03-05-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Lake Worth, FL
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Everyone from the service went to the Mausoleum to participate in Kaddish and then we all went back to the house for Shiva.

Very sad day.
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Old 03-05-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
I can't see how there would even be an opportunity for one. Even attendees at the funeral don't say prayers. They respectfully listen to eulogies and ask forgiveness from the deceased silently. Only close family goes out to the cemetery for burial and to say Kaddish.
I'll just post a link:

Quote:
After the burial, upon leaving the grave, it is Traditional for those in attendance who are not mourners to form a Shura, a double line facing each other, forming a pathway through which the mourners pass to receive words of comfort. Since Tradition teaches us that we don't offer words of consolation to mourners until after the burial, this provides the first opportunity to express the Traditional words of comfort, "May you be comforted among all the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem." Any kind words of sympathy may be said to the mourners as they pass through the double line. There is an expression in Hebrew that translates, "Words from the heart go directly to the heart" and any kind expression that is honest and meaningful is, more than likely, appropriate at this time.

Jewish Funeral / Burial Customs and Traditions
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