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Old 03-17-2014, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,359 posts, read 24,099,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HyperionGap View Post
And what then, pray tell, are Yidden?
Yidden is like Lantzmen, It's supposed to mean Jews.
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Old 03-17-2014, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Long Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HyperionGap View Post
Do mainly only ultra orthodox teach it to their kids? Also, what's the point? Why not just learn Modern Hebrew?
The point is to preserve their culture, and many groups do it. I have a friend who's family immigrated from Scotland several generations ago but Gaelic is still taught to the kids.

Yiddish (and the other ethnic dialects) are no different; they help to tie the new generation to those that preceded it, just as praying in Hebrew ties all Jews to those that came before us. I do think that Hebrew should the language that unites us all, but teaching Yiddish and Ladino (and the others) is also important for the groups who are connected to it.

Losing a part of the Jewish heritage is always a sad thing.
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Old 03-17-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,261,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
Yiddish is the language of Yidden. Modern Hebrew is the language of Israelies.
I guess that means Sephardic, Romaniote, Bukharian, Baghdadi, and everyone else who's not Ashkenazi aren't real Yidden.

Is there really anything special about Yiddish? It is a Germanic language that most German speakers can understand with the exception of Slavic and Hebrew words thrown in. Granted there is a lot of history and literature behind it, but the same will be true about English-speaking Jews in a matter of time.

American Jews, including religious ones, have been speaking English for over 200 years. If some of them move to other countries, should they keep speaking English because it is their family minhag (custom)?
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Old 03-17-2014, 08:57 AM
 
864 posts, read 733,607 times
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Quote:
I guess that means Sephardic, Romaniote, Bukharian, Baghdadi, and everyone else who's not Ashkenazi aren't real Yidden.
Didn't sefardim adapt their own form of Yiddish, Ladino? All Yidden are welcome to speak Yiddish.
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,261,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwishiwerethin View Post
Didn't sefardim adapt their own form of Yiddish, Ladino? All Yidden are welcome to speak Yiddish.
Does this look like Yiddish to you?

Quote:
Espor: Juego en el ke se realiza un esfuerzo fisiko, sujeto a unas reglas fijas, kon el ke se persige la perfeksion i koordinasion de los movimientos, para la mejora fisika i espiritual de la persona.
from the Ladino Wikipedia.
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Camberville
12,026 posts, read 16,765,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
A little history of Yiddish

4.* Development of Yiddish over the Ages


FWIW Using Spanish is a bad comparison to use for Mexicans. A better comparison would have been Nahuatl.
Or Ladino, though precious few speak Ladino as a native language which is why it is so much in danger of being lost.


Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
Does this look like Yiddish to you?



from the Ladino Wikipedia.
The Ladino Wikipedia page is pretty amazing - thank you for sharing, Usuario! Vikipedya

Just like someone who speaks German can understand quite a bit of Yiddish, I can understand Ladino pretty well. The spelling varies from Spanish but the roots stay mostly the same.
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:52 AM
 
Location: OC/LA
3,831 posts, read 3,700,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Yidden is like Lantzmen, It's supposed to mean Jews.
Yah that was my first assumption but I was hoping it only applied to Ashkenazi Jews. How anyone could say that Yiddish is the language of ALL Jews is the most asinine thing I've seen Iwish say in awhile. Anyways, this is confirming my research into how ultra orthodoxy basically has tried to freeze everything it can to ~1850, and anything that doesn't match that thinking is bad.

As usuario pointed out, why Yiddish? Why not go further back and choose Aramaic? Just another sign of how resistant certain groups are to change.
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Old 03-17-2014, 10:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Why not go further back and choose Aramaic?
Original Mama Loshen is Aramaic and is still the language of the Talmud. You and Usuario are welcome to bring back Aramaic.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,359 posts, read 24,099,835 times
Reputation: 8864
Quote:
Originally Posted by HyperionGap View Post
Yah that was my first assumption but I was hoping it only applied to Ashkenazi Jews. How anyone could say that Yiddish is the language of ALL Jews is the most asinine thing I've seen Iwish say in awhile.
Yiddish was created to keep the memory of Hebrew letters alive. Most European Jews had lost the correct pronunciations of Tanakh Hebrew through the generations. They took words and spelled them out using Hebrew letters in WYSIWYG format. Proof of that that loss was when two vav's where put together to create a sound of a letter that already existed; Vet (letter Bet w/o a dot in the center). Thus Yiddish requires no vowels because one reads it as they see it. But the had to make it sound different, so they removed the T sound and replaced it with the S sound which gave them them three letters that made the same sound instead of one in primarily Hebrew words.
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Old 03-28-2014, 10:03 AM
 
3,956 posts, read 3,341,414 times
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My oldest kids have been practicing their "Mah nishtana" in Yiddish all week in preparation for saying at our Seders coming up in a few weeks. My mother in law was over las night, and when she heard it, it brought her to tears. Hearing it in Yiddish totally connects her to her childhood, where yiddish was the only language spoken in the home. Thank G-d we Jews are making the attempt to continue to connect to our past. Thank G-d I have my kids in an Orthodox Jewish day school where they still learn Yiddish. We have no connection to modern Hebrew, and that is not a part of their curriculum.
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