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Old 08-11-2015, 06:06 AM
 
646 posts, read 346,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
You should've included the link of the rest of the information and that it was dated over five years ago.

Yiddish Language at Rutgers University, part of Jewish Studies

Nearly each sentence is out of date for the secular community. I'll cover one.



The last time they posted was in 2010. The remnants of that group basically meet for lunch now.
Yidish-vokh 2010
That might be true; there is a cute video about that though:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGRS7sSn6Ts


Anyhow, where I live there are places that do Yiddish-language weeks where people who are interested can at least learn the basics. This is done by universities, mostly.

I am really wanting to do it. While I can easily understand Yiddish and know quite a lot of words I do not by any means speak it.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Europe
24 posts, read 18,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
I was in Kiryas Yoel a few weeks ago. Beautiful town. Not much English spoken there for sure.
I can understand that they are trying to keep a certain distance to the "english-speaking world". That's probably the only way to keep their identity in all its facettes alive. Otherwise it would soon be as the others described: Only the older generations are speaking it yet, and with their passing away, the language will soon be forgotten and dead.. Hopefully communities like this will be able to persist in future times!
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Old 08-11-2015, 01:29 PM
 
13,093 posts, read 13,698,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
...it was dated over five years ago.
Thank you for providing more information on dates Pruz. Truly Hashem works wonders and miracles, the Jewish people are still here and Yiddish is still here. Even in 1995! Even in 2010! Even in 2015! B'H" How good is our portion, how pleasant our lot.

And who would ever imagine or think it ever possible that a Jewish writer who writes in Yiddish would win the Nobel Prize for Literature?

Here is an excerpt from Mr. Issac Bashevis Singer's Nobel Prize speech at the Nobel Banquet, December 10, 1978:

Your Majesties, Your Royal Highnesses, Ladies and Gentlemen,
People ask me often, 'Why do you write in a dying language?' And I want to explain it in a few words.

Firstly, I like to write ghost stories and nothing fits a ghost better than a dying language. The deader the language the more alive is the ghost. Ghosts love Yiddish and as far as I know, they all speak it.

Secondly, not only do I believe in ghosts, but also in resurrection. I am sure that millions of Yiddish speaking corpses will rise from their graves one day and their first question will be: "Is there any new Yiddish book to read?" For them Yiddish will not be dead.

Thirdly, for 2000 years Hebrew was considered a dead language. Suddenly it became strangely alive. What happened to Hebrew may also happen to Yiddish one day, (although I haven't the slightest idea how this miracle can take place.)

There is still a fourth minor reason for not forsaking Yiddish and this is: Yiddish may be a dying language but it is the only language I know well. Yiddish is my mother language and a mother is never really dead.
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Old 08-11-2015, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,373 posts, read 24,132,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sa-bi View Post
I can understand that they are trying to keep a certain distance to the "english-speaking world". That's probably the only way to keep their identity in all its facets alive. Otherwise it would soon be as the others described: Only the older generations are speaking it yet, and with their passing away, the language will soon be forgotten and dead.. Hopefully communities like this will be able to persist in future times!
Then maybe they should be "self sustaining" just like the Amish are and speak Deitsch amongst themselves all they want.
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Old 08-11-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,373 posts, read 24,132,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Thank you for providing more information on dates Pruz. Truly Hashem works wonders and miracles, the Jewish people are still here and Yiddish is still here. Even in 1995! Even in 2010! Even in 2015! B'H" How good is our portion, how pleasant our lot.

And who would ever imagine or think it ever possible that a Jewish writer who writes in Yiddish would win the Nobel Prize for Literature?

Here is an excerpt from Mr. Issac Bashevis Singer's Nobel Prize speech at the Nobel Banquet, December 10, 1978:

Your Majesties, Your Royal Highnesses, Ladies and Gentlemen,
People ask me often, 'Why do you write in a dying language?' And I want to explain it in a few words.

Firstly, I like to write ghost stories and nothing fits a ghost better than a dying language. The deader the language the more alive is the ghost. Ghosts love Yiddish and as far as I know, they all speak it.

Secondly, not only do I believe in ghosts, but also in resurrection. I am sure that millions of Yiddish speaking corpses will rise from their graves one day and their first question will be: "Is there any new Yiddish book to read?" For them Yiddish will not be dead.

Thirdly, for 2000 years Hebrew was considered a dead language. Suddenly it became strangely alive. What happened to Hebrew may also happen to Yiddish one day, (although I haven't the slightest idea how this miracle can take place.)

There is still a fourth minor reason for not forsaking Yiddish and this is: Yiddish may be a dying language but it is the only language I know well. Yiddish is my mother language and a mother is never really dead.
He spoke in Yiddish because it was the common language for all Jews living in Europe. The language was written in Hebrew letters in order to keep the letters sounds of Hebrew letters alive over hundreds of years. Yiddish started out as slang German and as it moved East it picked up words and dialects and morphed into the secular language it was once. Now it's morphed again into Yeshivish which is primarily only spoken by Ultra Orthodox Jews who make up around 10% of the population. The other 90% now use Hebrew as the language to bind Jews together.
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:36 PM
 
Location: US
27,992 posts, read 15,074,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
. Yiddish started out as slang German.
Heh, ain't that ironic...
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:37 PM
 
Location: US
27,992 posts, read 15,074,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
The other 90% now use Hebrew as the language to bind Jews together.
I try to use Hebrew with the Jews in Lakewood and get strange looks...However, I understand some of the Yiddish when I hear it in the stores...
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:00 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 4,049,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
He spoke in Yiddish because it was the common language for all Jews living in Europe. The language was written in Hebrew letters in order to keep the letters sounds of Hebrew letters alive over hundreds of years. Yiddish started out as slang German and as it moved East it picked up words and dialects and morphed into the secular language it was once. Now it's morphed again into Yeshivish which is primarily only spoken by Ultra Orthodox Jews who make up around 10% of the population. The other 90% now use Hebrew as the language to bind Jews together.

This is interesting. I didn't know this. But a lot of it was understandable for someone who didn't know the language, as in certain words seem similar to the English language. I know Spanish is no comparison, but some words of the Spanish language are similar to the English language, as in temptura (misspelled, but word is temperature in English).
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Old 08-11-2015, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,373 posts, read 24,132,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggienut View Post
This is interesting. I didn't know this. But a lot of it was understandable for someone who didn't know the language, as in certain words seem similar to the English language. I know Spanish is no comparison, but some words of the Spanish language are similar to the English language, as in temptura (misspelled, but word is temperature in English).
Well of course there are going to be similarities. This is because of their connections to Romance (Rome (Italy) influenced) languages. Yiddish was also influenced by it since it's foundation is from where Germany (southern part) bordered Rome influenced countries. I know a few elderly German Jews who came from the North and they don't speak Yiddish fluently. They picked up their broken Yiddish from when they came to the US.
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Old 08-12-2015, 04:26 PM
 
3,964 posts, read 3,346,864 times
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Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
I try to use Hebrew with the Jews in Lakewood and get strange looks...However, I understand some of the Yiddish when I hear it in the stores...
The Jews in Lakewood would consider Modern Hebrew to be a language spoken by G-dless people and Yiddish a language for G-d fearing.
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