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Old 03-18-2014, 08:27 AM
 
3,966 posts, read 3,350,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McDweller View Post
I thought there was some sort of religious prohibition.
The Torah requires a Jew to avoid driving a car on Shabbos. So if a Jew wants to live in a neighborhood where they are unable to walk to shul because the distance is too far to walk, well that's their choice. But if they drive to shul on Shabbos, they are violating our "deal" with Hashem. We have free will to do so - and the consequences are likely in the world to come.

The neighborhood I live in is roughly 30% Jewish, and I have 5 or 6 Orthodox shuls in walking distance. Nobody drives to my shul on Shabbos - they would be reprimanded if they did (rebuke is the Jewish method of "loving our brother in our heart.")
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:40 AM
 
181 posts, read 177,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Not really. Basically what is happening around the US is that they (Ultra Orthodox) are buying up neighborhoods (a house at a time) to create primarily Jewish neighborhoods. In some cities it works and in some it doesn't.
Must be expensive. They must either be fabulously wealthy or go broke in the process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
The Torah requires a Jew to avoid driving a car on Shabbos. So if a Jew wants to live in a neighborhood where they are unable to walk to shul because the distance is too far to walk, well that's their choice. But if they drive to shul on Shabbos, they are violating our "deal" with Hashem. We have free will to do so - and the consequences are likely in the world to come.

The neighborhood I live in is roughly 30% Jewish, and I have 5 or 6 Orthodox shuls in walking distance. Nobody drives to my shul on Shabbos - they would be reprimanded if they did (rebuke is the Jewish method of "loving our brother in our heart.")
What is the Jewish concept of "love"?

(I can't help but think of the Christian view of love, because the image of "God is love" always pops into my mind.)
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McDweller View Post
Must be expensive. They must either be fabulously wealthy or go broke in the process.



What is the Jewish concept of "love"?

(I can't help but think of the Christian view of love, because the image of "God is love" always pops into my mind.)
Love can be many things. Rebuke is one of many components if love.

This forum is full of folks who love each other, as we are typically in a constant state of rebuking each other.
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,380 posts, read 24,159,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McDweller View Post
Must be expensive. They must either be fabulously wealthy or go broke in the process.
Actually not. They look for older (40ish+ year old) neighborhoods that many of the homes are outdated. if it's a sect trying to take over the neighborhood, then the sect puts up the money in the name of the occupants. The wealthy ones are the leaders of the sect and their inner circle.

Keep in mind that there are some who you use the word "Shul" loosely. Is many instances its a home or a part of one.
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Old 03-18-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Hi OP, I'll answer your questions, but keep in mind that Jewish people in America are as a whole one of the least religious groups of Americans. There are probably more American Jews who eat ham than those who don't. Therefore don't take these answers as giving you any indication of what an actual Jewish person you know would actually do, unless you know that Jew to be religious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by McDweller View Post
Are Jews allowed to live in non-Jewish neighborhoods, or must they be isolated in close-knit communities like the Amish?
Even in New York City, Orthodox Jews share the neighborhood with non-Jews. Hasidic Jews, which are a type of ultra-Orthodox Jew, have on occasion formed ultra-Orthodox-only neighborhoods. Google Kiryas Joel or New Square for examples in New York State. There is no requirement for Jews to live in Jewish neighborhoods, however obligations for ritual prayer with at least 10 Jewish men mean that when there is one religious Jew, there are usually many more.

More observant non-Orthodox Jews will try to live near a synagogue.

Quote:
In university, are practicing Jewish students allowed to live with non-Jewish roommates and share the same food? Can a non-Jewish person prepare kosher food for the Jewish roommate?
Depends on how Orthodox they are. Non-Orthodox Jews are generally okay living with non-Jewish roommates and even co-ed dorms. Modern Orthodox Jews might be fine with single sex, however they would not share a kitchen. Ultra-Orthodox Jews generally do not send their children to college because they would be exposed to secular and non-Orthodox Jewish ideas. In Judaism there is a concept of "bishul yisrael": if a non-Jew cooks in a kosher kitchen with kosher ingredients, the food may be okay to eat for an Orthodox Jew, however if the food is of a kind that is worthy of being on a king's table, then an Orthodox Jew must be present during the cooking process, otherwise the food will not be kosher.

Quote:
What should a Jewish person do when he/she is invited to a Christian church or Muslim mosque or an Unitarian Universalist congregation?
Ultra-Orthodox Jews would never set foot in anything other than an Orthodox synagogue. Some Modern Orthodox Jews might be okay with going into a mosque or a UU Church, but many Orthodox authorities have declared Christianity idolatory and would not allow Orthodox Jews to set foot into a regular church.

Unfortunately for UU people, very few people, including Jews, know the difference between a UU Church and a regular church and thus it would probably be included in the general prohibition against visiting churches.
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Old 03-18-2014, 11:26 AM
 
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Not that you need my approval, but that was an awesome well thought out answer, Usario.
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Camberville
12,062 posts, read 16,799,475 times
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One construct that might make a neighborhood "Jewish" versus not is the eruv - a boundary formed by walls and wire that allows Jews to carry things (including pushing a carriage) on Shabbat and Yom Kippur. Eruv - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Many people do not even know their neighborhood is bound by an eruv - they're quite inconspicuous unless you know what to look for! In my area, you can tell which areas are bound by an eruv because rent and housing costs are significantly more expensive and price the vast majority of people out (and rent is already prohibitively expensive here!). Great for homeowners, horrible for people trying to be observant.

I attended a Jewish-affiliated university and many steps were taken to make campus life accessible for all flavors of Judaism as well as those who are not Jewish. My senior year, I lived with a Conservadox (Orthodox in all but treatment of women - she is now studying to be a rabbi) woman who kept Shabbat and kept Kosher. The other 5 of us in the apartment did not keep Kosher, so we had 4 sets of cooking utensils, plates, and pots and pans: dairy, meat, vegetarian, and treif. One of our neighbors was designated the Kosher oven so that the observant students could remain so but the rest of us would not need to worry about finding dairy replacements for our baking or never roasting a chicken since we did not have double ovens.

Most colleges at least offer a Hillel which generally has a Kosher kitchen. Most dining halls also offer some Kosher foods, though the options range. My university had a full time rabbi just in Kosher dining hall.

Regarding other houses of worship, you will find a range. I strongly believe in understanding other religions - particularly because I grew up in a rural part of the South where I was the only Jew most people had ever met and often found myself in a weird position of trying to defend myself against proselytizing. Now I do a lot of work with Muslim-Jewish dialogue groups and the location shifts between mosques and synagogues.
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Not that you need my approval, but that was an awesome well thought out answer, Usario.
Thanks dude.
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Old 03-18-2014, 02:48 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,161,281 times
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Always having great interest in knowing more about what I don't know, when Harry Golden began appearing on tv, I subscribed to the newspaper he wrote and published. I see on Google that it ended in l968. "The Carolina Israelite." It arrived about 6 times a year and I looked forward to reading it. He also wrote books and I read each one. ://www.thejewishweek.com/news/national/race_and_identity_golden_era

After 10 years of marriage, my brother converted and it was not the result of proselytizing. For one thing, Jews do not proselytize. They don't send missionaries out to bring in people to convert. There were several reasons for his decision, but, one was that he was tired of defending his wife from the ignorant remarks she often heard... not remarks directed at her, necessarily, but remarks often made by people who made them just to be doing. My brother wanted to be able to tell someone he was a Jew and did not appreciate what they said. Since he is 6' 5", it did get their attention. Much better than saying, my wife is a Jew.... etc., etc.
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Old 03-19-2014, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,279 posts, read 54,731,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McDweller View Post
Are Jews allowed to live in non-Jewish neighborhoods?

I thought there was some sort of religious prohibition.
Bizarre question. You don't know any Jews who live down the street or on the next block?
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