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Old 03-26-2018, 09:08 PM
 
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Just remember, if you pick the Sephardic custom and eat the rice, you also have to say selichos every morning for a month like the Sephardim.
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Just remember, if you pick the Sephardic custom and eat the rice, you also have to say selichos every morning for a month like the Sephardim.
there is that!
it is more a question of curiosity. I've always done for the last 9 years no rice, and no gebrokts and no kitniyot. so maybe i've answered my own question, if I've done that the last 9 years then it appears I do have a minhag after all, and will stick with it.
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Old 03-27-2018, 12:02 AM
 
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even with my thoroughly secular upbringing, i must have carried over some Jewish memories of how things are done either in my DNA, or from a past life, or both. From the first time i went to someone's house for a meal it felt "off" somehow to wash hands after kiddush, and not before. I kept wanting to wash hands before, and had no idea why, because for years I never saw this done. I still have not seen this done. However I have read that there are some who wash before kiddush and in several places it mentions this is a "German custom" which is where my Jewish grandparents were from. So then I felt really happy that I remembered something from another time and place.
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Old 03-27-2018, 06:06 AM
 
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Also isn't something about inviting strangers (or the poor) who have nowhere to go for the seder in the Haggadah? If so where it is supposed to be written?
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Old 03-27-2018, 07:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
Also isn't something about inviting strangers (or the poor) who have nowhere to go for the seder in the Haggadah? If so where it is supposed to be written?
הגדה של פסח ה׳:ג׳
(ג) הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִּי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַּׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַּׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין.

Pesach Haggadah 5:3

This is the bread of destitution that our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Anyone who is famished should come and eat, anyone who is in need should come and partake of the Pesach sacrifice. Now we are here, next year we will be in the land of Israel; this year we are slaves, next year we will be free people
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Old 03-27-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: NJ
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We invite them (sort of) in the beginning of the seder when we recite "ha lachma anya" (This is the bread of affliction). Whether or not that is a sincere invitation at that late point in the day is a matter of discussion.
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Old 03-27-2018, 09:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
הגדה של פסח ה׳:ג׳
(ג) הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִּי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְאַרְעָא דְמִצְרָיִם. כָּל דִכְפִין יֵיתֵי וְיֵיכֹל, כָּל דִצְרִיךְ יֵיתֵי וְיִפְסַח. הָשַּׁתָּא הָכָא, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּאַרְעָא דְיִשְׂרָאֵל. הָשַּׁתָּא עַבְדֵי, לְשָׁנָה הַבָּאָה בְּנֵי חוֹרִין.

Pesach Haggadah 5:3

This is the bread of destitution that our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Anyone who is famished should come and eat, anyone who is in need should come and partake of the Pesach sacrifice. Now we are here, next year we will be in the land of Israel; this year we are slaves, next year we will be free people
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosends View Post
We invite them (sort of) in the beginning of the seder when we recite "ha lachma anya" (This is the bread of affliction). Whether or not that is a sincere invitation at that late point in the day is a matter of discussion.
Thanks for both of these references.
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Old 03-28-2018, 07:37 PM
 
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- Since you brought up not sharing Passover with (Gentiles)?

- It caused to me to reflect on the fact that the
Christian's memorial of Christ's crucifixion/resurrection falls this same weekend as The Jewish Passover this year.

- In which this is also the first year of Israel restricting Christian (gentile) access to Israel and their holy sites
over building taxation and security matters. Just thought it was an interesting time of separation.
Which this reminded me about. Wondering if Israel had the same idea too at this time.
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Old 03-29-2018, 06:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RevelationWriter View Post
- Since you brought up not sharing Passover with (Gentiles)?

- It caused to me to reflect on the fact that the
Christian's memorial of Christ's crucifixion/resurrection falls this same weekend as The Jewish Passover this year.

- In which this is also the first year of Israel restricting Christian (gentile) access to Israel and their holy sites
over building taxation and security matters. Just thought it was an interesting time of separation.
Which this reminded me about. Wondering if Israel had the same idea too at this time.
It is not surprising that Passover overlaps with the Easter weekend being that Jesus was Jewish and he was celebrating Passover during the famous "Last Supper". As for Israel putting in restrictions on access from the West Bank & Gaza that is not unusual during certain Jewish holiday seasons.

I originally raised the subject of not allowing a non-Jew to attend a seder as I remember my father years ago refusing to go to one (of a cousin of his who was temporarily living in Israel) on the grounds that a non-Jew was invited and this was in Israel.
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Old 03-30-2018, 06:05 PM
 
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- I had heard that 'christian' religious building are closed
due to Israel's new policy of Taxation which started this year.

I just thought the coincidence of what was said interesting with this as well.
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