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Old 04-28-2019, 04:49 PM
 
51 posts, read 22,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
My older nephew (son of my sister) is a product of intermarriage as his father isn't Jewish. When it came time for his Bar Mitzva, he said he wasn't sure he wanted to be Jewish. A Chabad rabbi told him that he is Jewish whether he likes it or not and therefore the question is only whether he wants to act like a Jewish man or not. This convinced my older nephew to participate in his own Bar Mitzva ceremony!
Hi Chava61,

Thank you for sharing. What the Chabad rabbi told your nephew reminds me of a saying from Pirkei Avot In a place where there are no men, strive to be a man. Meaning in a place where people are amoral strive to do what is right.

How fitting to our discussion, especially when we have so many Jews today abandoning their G-d and their people. We truly need more men and women to stand up for what is right.
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Old 04-28-2019, 04:52 PM
 
Location: NNJ
9,829 posts, read 5,509,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Intermarriage destroys, reduces, diminishes, annihilates, disappears, erases, damages the Jewish people. Plenty of Jews recognize that regardless of their observance.
You know its very difficult to teach my children to keep an open mind when people with this attitude exist... (not just this post but others as well)

Athiest Asian married to a Athiest Jew; 3 children taught both Roman Catholicism and Jewish tradition for the sake of teaching how to be open minded, always learning, and no fear of discovery. I also insist of teaching them other religious views so that they can understand that people come from all walks of life.

I refuse to teach my kids that religion (in general) is bad and divisive. However, there is many examples of exactly that; it is difficult to explain the good in religion.
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Old 04-28-2019, 05:19 PM
 
51 posts, read 22,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usayit View Post
You know its very difficult to teach my children to keep an open mind when people with this attitude exist... (not just this post but others as well)

Athiest Asian married to a Athiest Jew; 3 children taught both Roman Catholicism and Jewish tradition for the sake of teaching how to be open minded, always learning, and no fear of discovery. I also insist of teaching them other religious views so that they can understand that people come from all walks of life.

I refuse to teach my kids that religion (in general) is bad and divisive. However, there is many examples of exactly that; it is difficult to explain the good in religion.
Hi,

In Judaism we believe that all people are created in G-d’s image and unlike some other religions we believe that all righteous people have a place in the world to come. When we say that intermarriage is a threat, it is not about being close minded or exclusionary it is about survival. Jews are only .2 percent of the world’s population, marrying with in our people and having Jewish children is essential to our survival.

Last edited by Maccabee36; 04-28-2019 at 06:37 PM..
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Old 04-29-2019, 05:30 AM
 
51 posts, read 22,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalhevet View Post
I didn't read all 14 pages of this thread, but I will say that while in reality you can't control who your kids will ultimately marry, if you give them a strong sense of who they are and have them understand how important (and beautiful) being Jewish is, it's easier. I have a sign that was made for me in my living room that says, "As for me and my house, NO POSTHUMOUS VICTORY!" It comes form a slogan that was in a lot of traditional Jewish homes after WWII, "No posthumous victory for Hitler", meaning that we HAVE to keep our heritage alive, or we die out and Hitler still wins. It's very powerful for me.
Thank you Shalhevet, its good advice and very inspiring.
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Old 04-29-2019, 11:29 AM
 
118 posts, read 24,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccabee36 View Post
Thank you Shalhevet, its good advice and very inspiring.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:21 AM
 
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I am not Jewish I was raised in an atheist home and converted to Catholicism at 19. I am now 50 and married a Cradle Catholic (a Catholic born into a Catholic home and raised Catholic). Our three children attend Catholic schools.

I was interested in the part of the discussion regarding Jewish day schools. I was shocked to see how expensive the Jewish day schools were in our city. I compared them with other private schools out of interest. In my experience Catholic schools are some of the most affordable private schools. This is because the whole Catholic community contribute to Catholic schools. Of the money that the parish raises for all causes, some will go to support the Catholic school if there is one associated with the parish. Families that contribute financially to their local parish usually get a reduction in school fees for this reason. Also, families who attend Catholic schools are expected to contribute significant volunteer hours to the school. Of course, in many families these days both parents work, so many volunteer hours can be coaching children at weekends for CYO sports or calling businesses for donations to the annual auction etc. Parents who are available during the day can help the school nurse, work in the library or watch the children at recess. This all helps to keep costs down.

However, Catholic school can still be too expensive for many families. Schools and parishes try to subsidize parents who are practicing Catholics and want a Catholic education for their children, so some dioceses have funds to help those families and also the more children from the same family attending, the cost of each extra child attending is more affordable. In the past Catholic schools were affordable for working class families because Catholic religious orders (nuns and brothers) ran the schools as a ministry and did not take the same salary as a regular teacher, which obviously kept costs down. Since the 1960s the Church has less vocations for these ministries and also times have changed and a nun or brother will be paid the same salary as any other teacher. Catholics teachers are still paid less than public school teachers, but will often choose a Catholic environment because they are Catholic themselves or enjoy the ethos and strong community and parental involvement of Catholic schools.

For example, my son is in 7th grade and there are just two classes. I am contacted immediately by his teachers or principal if there are any issues of any kind. I know a lot of adults are keeping a close eye on him and are not shy in letting me or my husband know if they have any concerns. I like this level of involvement. When there was a suggestion that he might be verbally bullying another student, he was brought in for a discussion, apologized and received a detention quickly with my full support. I know my children will not fall between the cracks or be unknown or unseen. He gets lots of encouragement and support, with high standards in academics and behavior expected from everyone.

My older girls are at a Jesuit High School.

I know that some Bishops have decided to pool all the school funds for all schools in their diocese. In Kansas I believe there is a bishop who makes Catholic school accessible to all families who want their children to have a Catholic education education and he does this by pooling all the financial resources of all the schools.

Religious communities obviously solve their educational issues in different ways, but I would assume that making Jewish Day school more accessible and affordable to be a positive step in encouraging more observance.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:29 AM
 
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Here is an example in Wichita where the parishes financially support all the children that want to attend Catholic schools. As a result 70% of the children in one parish attend Catholic school in comparison to 15% nationally.

https://ace.nd.edu/news/wichita-pari...on-for-schools

These comments are purely meant as information for how other communities have responded to the issue of wanting to give their children an education at a religious day school. I am assuming that there may be similar issues, such as affordability, especially once you have more than a couple of children. The main focus has been on the whole community assuming financial responsibility for the education of children, rather than leaving it to the families alone.

Last edited by joyfulmorning; 06-25-2019 at 09:50 AM.. Reason: Website link not live
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:22 AM
 
838 posts, read 99,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyfulmorning View Post
Religious communities obviously solve their educational issues in different ways, but I would assume that making Jewish Day school more accessible and affordable to be a positive step in encouraging more observance.

But it's not merely a matter of encouraging more observance (although that's certainly a factor).

Nearly a quarter of the U.S. population is Catholic, so American Catholics probably have one in four chances of meeting another Catholic, falling in love, and marrying that person. That's regardless of whether or not they are sent to Catholic school as a child.

Jews, on the other hand, comprise less than 2% of the U.S. population. Subsequently, Jews face different odds and different latitude than Catholics face when it comes to finding a like-minded mate of the same religion.
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:29 AM
 
19 posts, read 3,741 times
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I understand and agree Rachel. I am just commenting on the part of this thread where Jewish Day schools are mentioned.
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:33 AM
 
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My understanding was that one factor that was mentioned as a positive that encourages involvement in the community and an active Jewish identity was attending Jewish day schools. I got the impression that they are considered expensive, discouraging (or making it financially impossible) for parents who would like their children to attend.

Many Catholics are nominally Catholic and so parochial schools are often chosen by parents who want a religious education for their children, so they know and practice their faith.

I am also of the belief, like another commentator that the observance of the parents is the most important factor in passing on the faith to the next generation. Just sending your children to Catholic school won’t make them Catholic.

You may rustle up a Catholic. Whether they believe in God, pray and go to Mass in another thing. Catholicism can be cultural and fade across the generations without practice. I am not suggested this is the same as Judaism which I consider more than cultural and religious but with a strong connection to specific groups of people who have been identifiable across many generations. Correct me if necessary.

Last edited by joyfulmorning; 06-25-2019 at 10:44 AM..
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