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Old 05-09-2019, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Camberville
12,035 posts, read 16,776,975 times
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My Hebrew name is Rivka Esther... Esther was the one given to me at birth and I took Rivka on my 2 year cancerversary while in Israel. It was the name of a friend who died of the same type of cancer as I had at the same age I was when I hit that milestone: 25.


I've always loved both names. I think Rivka is much prettier than Rebecca!


Others I love are Asher, Leor, and Lev for men and Miriam, Dafna and Ayelet for women.
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
9,291 posts, read 5,498,434 times
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I am not Jewish, but my daughter-in-Law is. What do you think of Ruth or Naomi as girl’s names reflecting cultural history?

Or what of Mary? It has been usurped by Catholics, but it remains the name of the first Jewish girl given prominence in the NT——which is full of Jews!!!

Or Deborah, a judge of Israel and the instrument of great change. One willing to fight, too!
Anyway, just observation and questions from a goy!
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:36 PM
 
594 posts, read 60,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charolastra00 View Post
My Hebrew name is Rivka Esther... Esther was the one given to me at birth and I took Rivka on my 2 year cancerversary while in Israel. It was the name of a friend who died of the same type of cancer as I had at the same age I was when I hit that milestone: 25.

I've always loved both names. I think Rivka is much prettier than Rebecca!

Others I love are Asher, Leor, and Lev for men and Miriam, Dafna and Ayelet for women.

Congratulations on your cancerversary! May you have many more!

What a beautiful gesture, to take the name of a friend who died and didn't get to celebrate the same milestone that you did. I'm sorry for the loss of your friend.

And I think that Rivka is much prettier than Rebecca, too! I like your other favorite names, as well!
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:38 PM
 
594 posts, read 60,465 times
Reputation: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wardendresden View Post
I am not Jewish, but my daughter-in-Law is. What do you think of Ruth or Naomi as girl’s names reflecting cultural history?

Or what of Mary? It has been usurped by Catholics, but it remains the name of the first Jewish girl given prominence in the NT——which is full of Jews!!!

Or Deborah, a judge of Israel and the instrument of great change. One willing to fight, too!
Anyway, just observation and questions from a goy!

Those are all lovely names, Wardendresden. Although I prefer more Jewish-sounding versions.

Rus (pronounced ROOS) is a Yiddish/Ashkenazic pronunciation of Ruth.
Naomi pronounced in Hebrew as nah-oh-MEE, rather than the English pronunciation of nay-OH-mee.
Miryam (pronounced meer-YAHM), instead of Mary.
Dvora (pronounced dvoh-RAH), instead of Deborah.
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Old 05-09-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
9,291 posts, read 5,498,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
Those are all lovely names, Wardendresden. Although I prefer more Jewish-sounding versions.

Rus (pronounced ROOS) is a Yiddish/Ashkenazic pronunciation of Ruth.
Naomi pronounced in Hebrew as nah-oh-MEE, rather than the English pronunciation of nay-OH-mee.
Miryam (pronounced meer-YAHM), instead of Mary.
Dvora (pronounced dvoh-RAH), instead of Deborah.
Thank you, Rachel, for the lesson. It's interesting to me that so many Biblical names reflected the personality described in the pages, making me think that the naming itself was a kind of spiritual lesson to Hebrew readers or listeners.

And there are a host of Hebrew words bastardized by Christianity to mean something it never meant to Hebrews. So names are not the only thing we may have twisted into unfamiliar connotations.

Thank you again,
Shalom לשלום
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Old 05-09-2019, 08:37 PM
 
594 posts, read 60,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wardendresden View Post
Thank you, Rachel, for the lesson. It's interesting to me that so many Biblical names reflected the personality described in the pages, making me think that the naming itself was a kind of spiritual lesson to Hebrew readers or listeners.

And there are a host of Hebrew words bastardized by Christianity to mean something it never meant to Hebrews. So names are not the only thing we may have twisted into unfamiliar connotations.

Thank you again,
Shalom לשלום

You're welcome, Wardendresden. You're very perceptive to have noticed the spirituality expressed in Jewish names. In Judaism, the significance of one's name goes even deeper than its meaning. This is why it's so important that every Jew should have a Hebrew name.

The Hebrew word for "name" is "shem" (שם), the letters of which make up the middle of the Hebrew word neshamah (נשמה), meaning "soul." It is no mere coincidence that the Hebrew words for "name" and "soul" are linked in this way.

And now I have a gift for you -- an honorary Jewish name that is an anagram of your screen name.

Sender Widderman
= I'm Wardendresden

Sender: Yiddish form of the name Alexander. Although Alexander is actually of Greek origin, it was adopted by Jews as a Hebrew name during the time of Alexander the Great, in recognition of his benevolence towards the Jews.

Widderman: Ashkenazic surname, meaning "ram man." Possibly describing a person who either tended sheep or had the strength of a ram.
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Old 05-09-2019, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
9,291 posts, read 5,498,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
You're welcome, Wardendresden. You're very perceptive to have noticed the spirituality expressed in Jewish names. In Judaism, the significance of one's name goes even deeper than its meaning. This is why it's so important that every Jew should have a Hebrew name.

The Hebrew word for "name" is "shem" (שם), the letters of which make up the middle of the Hebrew word neshamah (נשמה), meaning "soul." It is no mere coincidence that the Hebrew words for "name" and "soul" are linked in this way.

And now I have a gift for you -- an honorary Jewish name that is an anagram of your screen name.

Sender Widderman
= I'm Wardendresden

Sender: Yiddish form of the name Alexander. Although Alexander is actually of Greek origin, it was adopted by Jews as a Hebrew name during the time of Alexander the Great, in recognition of his benevolence towards the Jews.

Widderman: Ashkenazic surname, meaning "ram man." Possibly describing a person who either tended sheep or had the strength of a ram.
Thank you so very much! I actually took that screen name from a series of fiction books I read by Jim Butcher. The protagonist is a private detective who happens to be a wizard, and, of course, gets called in by the Chicago PD on all crimes that seem to have a supernatural element.

Anyway, the protagonist's name is Harry Dresden, and late in the books he is appointed a "Warden" by the white witches council that gives him the power to intervene if supernatural forces try to intervene in the world. I guess he could be considered a "ram man" of sorts.

I'm trying to learn as much as I can about my DIL's faith and culture and it has already had an impact on my Christian beliefs. This year we celebrated our second Passover with her family and participated in the traditional reading (they are Reformed).

But you are very kind, and once more Yasher Koach
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:00 AM
 
Location: US
27,989 posts, read 15,066,269 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
You're welcome, Wardendresden. You're very perceptive to have noticed the spirituality expressed in Jewish names. In Judaism, the significance of one's name goes even deeper than its meaning. This is why it's so important that every Jew should have a Hebrew name.

The Hebrew word for "name" is "shem" (שם), the letters of which make up the middle of the Hebrew word neshamah (נשמה), meaning "soul." It is no mere coincidence that the Hebrew words for "name" and "soul" are linked in this way.

And now I have a gift for you -- an honorary Jewish name that is an anagram of your screen name.

Sender Widderman
= I'm Wardendresden

Sender: Yiddish form of the name Alexander. Although Alexander is actually of Greek origin, it was adopted by Jews as a Hebrew name during the time of Alexander the Great, in recognition of his benevolence towards the Jews.

Widderman: Ashkenazic surname, meaning "ram man." Possibly describing a person who either tended sheep or had the strength of a ram.
How about the surname Meyers?...
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Old 05-10-2019, 06:25 AM
 
594 posts, read 60,465 times
Reputation: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
How about the surname Meyers?...

The Jewish surname Meyers is a patronymic, meaning "son of Meyer." Meyer or Meir (מאיר) is a name from the Talmud, meaning "to enlighten; to give light."

There are many Jewish surnames with "Meyer" in them (Meyers, Meyerson, Meyeroff, Meyerfeld, etc), and the reason for this is that the name Meyer/Meir is a Jewish given name that became popular due to Jews taking the name of the famous Mishnaic sage Rabbi Meir the Miracle Maker. When governments started to require Jews to take on surnames for ourselves, many chose to use some form of Meyer.
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Old 05-10-2019, 09:43 AM
 
Location: US
27,989 posts, read 15,066,269 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
The Jewish surname Meyers is a patronymic, meaning "son of Meyer." Meyer or Meir (מאיר) is a name from the Talmud, meaning "to enlighten; to give light."

There are many Jewish surnames with "Meyer" in them (Meyers, Meyerson, Meyeroff, Meyerfeld, etc), and the reason for this is that the name Meyer/Meir is a Jewish given name that became popular due to Jews taking the name of the famous Mishnaic sage Rabbi Meir the Miracle Maker. When governments started to require Jews to take on surnames for ourselves, many chose to use some form of Meyer.
The reason I ask is because that was my grandmother’s mother’s maiden name...
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