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Old 04-15-2019, 07:43 PM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,339,069 times
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Originally Posted by rosends View Post
While I think that historically, women did not learn intensive Talmud, historically, most men did not either. Learning was not for everyone -- the masses knew the little bits they needed for daily practice. Women and men had other responsibilities and obligations. But times have changed. Now learning Talmud texts is available on all levels to all men. If times can change in this way, I see no reason why the times aren't changing in a parallel way, allowing women to learn the same material on the same intense level. In our school, one of the shiurim finished masechet Ta'anit. Co-ed.
Love ya, Rosends. But even you’d admit you’re just one click removed from the yeshivishe velte. Coed Gamara? Oye. Do you also bring niddah shailas to your rebbitzen?
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Old 04-16-2019, 04:45 AM
 
Location: NJ
1,378 posts, read 494,347 times
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Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Love ya, Rosends. But even you’d admit you’re just one click removed from the yeshivishe velte. Coed Gamara? Oye. Do you also bring niddah shailas to your rebbitzen?
I don't think that equating a process which includes women's learning of gemara with having a female mora d'asra makes logical sense.

I don't have any niddah shailas. When my wife does, she goes to a specific rabbi -- not every one is trained or equipped to answer her questions (though there are women who have been deemed expert in certain areas of niddah law, and I have asked female experts about the technicalities of the laws, if not in application, then in theory).
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Old 04-16-2019, 07:59 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,339,069 times
Reputation: 1246
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosends View Post
I don't think that equating a process which includes women's learning of gemara with having a female mora d'asra makes logical sense.

I don't have any niddah shailas. When my wife does, she goes to a specific rabbi -- not every one is trained or equipped to answer her questions (though there are women who have been deemed expert in certain areas of niddah law, and I have asked female experts about the technicalities of the laws, if not in application, then in theory).
I think you and I are just holding in different places. All good.
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