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Old 04-14-2019, 09:28 PM
 
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Has anyone here read Rashi's Daughters, the fictional trilogy about the family of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki? If so, what did you think of it?

I enjoyed all three novels, and found them to be a fascinating glimpse into the day-to-day lives of Jews in medieval France. But whether you also enjoyed the novels as I did, or didn't care for them at all, I'd be interested in hearing your views.
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:31 AM
 
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Have not read them. Sounds blechie and feminist and not terribly Torahdik. Iím open to being convinced otherwise.
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Have not read them. Sounds blechie and feminist and not terribly Torahdik. I’m open to being convinced otherwise.

I don't know whether you would consider a woman who studies Talmud to be a "feminist." Beyond that, the daughters in the trilogy are strictly traditionalist in their marriages, dress, demeanor, etc.
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
I don't know whether you would consider a woman who studies Talmud to be a "feminist." Beyond that, the daughters in the trilogy are strictly traditionalist in their marriages, dress, demeanor, etc.
Itís unlikely to be a true story. Iíve never heard an appropriate reason for a woman to study Talmud, unless theyíve met all their other learning and chinuch (teaching our children) obligations in life. If a woman is learning Talmud at the expense of doing what she is obligated, then itís a bizoyan (disgrace). It all smacks of copying the feminist hashkafa of the nations.
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Old 04-15-2019, 10:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Itís unlikely to be a true story. Iíve never heard an appropriate reason for a woman to study Talmud, unless theyíve met all their other learning and chinuch (teaching our children) obligations in life. If a woman is learning Talmud at the expense of doing what she is obligated, then itís a bizoyan (disgrace). It all smacks of copying the feminist hashkafa of the nations.

You may have trouble understanding this, but there are women who wish to learn just for the sheer joy of learning. Education and family obligations are not mutually exclusive.
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Old 04-15-2019, 03:57 PM
 
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You may have trouble understanding this, but there are women who wish to learn just for the sheer joy of learning. Education and family obligations are not mutually exclusive.
No, I certainly understand what youíre saying. Itís just weird for me. In the world of Torah, itís just not done. And Iím happy that it makes you happy, but I struggle to see the value to the Jewish people that youíre happy.
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Old 04-15-2019, 04:53 PM
 
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No, I certainly understand what youíre saying. Itís just weird for me. In the world of Torah, itís just not done. And Iím happy that it makes you happy, but I struggle to see the value to the Jewish people that youíre happy.

My warm and loving Jewish circle of family and friends don't struggle to see the value in my joy of reading, learning, and discovery.
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
No, I certainly understand what youíre saying. Itís just weird for me. In the world of Torah, itís just not done. And Iím happy that it makes you happy, but I struggle to see the value to the Jewish people that youíre happy.
I echo Rachel in NY's sentiments. (We Rachel's need to stick together!) I take a Torah class throughout the year, once a week, and it is my understanding that learning is a mitzvah. Why wouldn't you want a woman to develop a richer knowledge of our history? (I also enjoy the comraderie of the other Jewish women in my class for whom learning is also a pleasure.)

And I assure you I am meeting all my other obligations, and if a family matter needs my attention on the day I take class, I skip the class and attend to my family's needs.
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:27 PM
 
Location: U.S.A
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I seem to recall having read those books. It about life in the dark ages in northern France. I can't imagine someone not liking the books. Especially people that still appear to embrace the dark ages to this day. I would imagine they would be right at home reading them.

The books are not about condoning or advocating the learning of Talmud. The books are about what life was like during that period of time. Their own mother condemned the idea of the daughters learning Talmud. She probably has her own cheering squad with some that read the books.
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
I echo Rachel in NY's sentiments. (We Rachel's need to stick together!) I take a Torah class throughout the year, once a week, and it is my understanding that learning is a mitzvah. Why wouldn't you want a woman to develop a richer knowledge of our history? (I also enjoy the comraderie of the other Jewish women in my class for whom learning is also a pleasure.)

And I assure you I am meeting all my other obligations, and if a family matter needs my attention on the day I take class, I skip the class and attend to my family's needs.
Nothing wrong with taking appropriate Torah classes. Nothing wrong with familiarizing yourself with Oral Torah. And you SHOULD be learning written Torah. But learning Mishna and Gamara bíiyun (in depth) is simply not what Hashem is asking if you. Learn learn learn! But you should maybe ask your Lubavitch rebbeís what an appropriate way/content to learn. If you decide for yourself, youíre no better than the goyim.
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