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Old 05-22-2019, 07:49 PM
 
Location: U.S.A
55 posts, read 6,919 times
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Embalmed well over 10,000 people . . . Never once saw an amputated limb placed with the deceased. Usually limbs can be studied or destroyed by the medical community.


Edited: Embalmed several dozen dogs too. People travel from out of town, and want to take their friend home for burial.
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Old 05-22-2019, 07:59 PM
 
Location: U.S.A
55 posts, read 6,919 times
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Just a quick story about a dog. . . When I was young the owner of a funeral home ( very old man ) had a dog on the carpet of his office. This dog was his childhood dog. His father embalmed the dog with a fluid of heavy arsenic which is a type of liquid metal. The dog looked just like it was asleep. Dead for well over 50 - 60 years.
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Old 05-22-2019, 08:05 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 652,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
That's interesting about the pint of blood! I understand that sometimes amputated limbs have to be buried with the deceased, and I've always wondered whether those were embalmed if the owner was still living, or whether they were buried to await the owner's burial at some later date following death.

btw, this entire topic is fascinating! Thanks, my other Rachel, for posting it!
You're welcome!

About amputated limbs.....this happened with my grandfather. He had his arm amputated, and it was buried. When he died a short time later, the arm was buried with him. I was only a child at the time and don't the details.
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Old 05-22-2019, 08:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jacob II View Post
Embalmed well over 10,000 people . . . Never once saw an amputated limb placed with the deceased. Usually limbs can be studied or destroyed by the medical community.


Edited: Embalmed several dozen dogs too. People travel from out of town, and want to take their friend home for burial.
I just answered the other Rachel on the topic of burying an amputated limb with the deceased. Happened in my grandfather's case.
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Old 05-22-2019, 08:16 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 652,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob II View Post
Just a quick story about a dog. . . When I was young the owner of a funeral home ( very old man ) had a dog on the carpet of his office. This dog was his childhood dog. His father embalmed the dog with a fluid of heavy arsenic which is a type of liquid metal. The dog looked just like it was asleep. Dead for well over 50 - 60 years.
Oh my. That gives me the heebie jeebies.
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Old 05-22-2019, 08:26 PM
 
Location: U.S.A
55 posts, read 6,919 times
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Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
I just answered the other Rachel on the topic of burying an amputated limb with the deceased. Happened in my grandfather's case.

I'm not doubting it. The 10,000 people I have taken care of is just a drop compared to the millions upon millions of people and experiences. I have had my share of unique experiences as well. I just missed out on the amputated limb saved for burial experience.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:28 PM
 
Location: U.S.A
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I just want to make something clear. The industry use to be a very personal fulfilling experience. It was the highest privileged to help humanity with this need. The industry I feel changed. It has become a corporate predatory haven for those that seek wealth by using sales techniques that we would have never dreamed of doing. Many feel as I do, and I left the industry after 25 years of service. I let people choose what they felt they needed. Some wanted expensive send offs for loved ones. Some were poor and needed both help and guidance. And we supplied that to the best of our ability. Some had to have the state step into the situation. If I were ever trained for anything. It was to help people deal with grief. Also, to attempt in every way to eliminate the guilt that can sometimes accompany the poor in not having the money to spend on a loved ones funeral. I DO NOT advocate, condone, or promote people over extending themselves on funerals. I have said that thousands of times. Today I personally endorse cremation as a good alternative considering the global population, and the high cost of expenses related to traditional burial.
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:42 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 652,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob II View Post
I just want to make something clear. The industry use to be a very personal fulfilling experience. It was the highest privileged to help humanity with this need. The industry I feel changed. It has become a corporate predatory haven for those that seek wealth by using sales techniques that we would have never dreamed of doing. Many feel as I do, and I left the industry after 25 years of service. I let people choose what they felt they needed. Some wanted expensive send offs for loved ones. Some were poor and needed both help and guidance. And we supplied that to the best of our ability. Some had to have the state step into the situation. If I were ever trained for anything. It was to help people deal with grief. Also, to attempt in every way to eliminate the guilt that can sometimes accompany the poor in not having the money to spend on a loved ones funeral. I DO NOT advocate, condone, or promote people over extending themselves on funerals. I have said that thousands of times. Today I personally endorse cremation as a good alternative considering the global population, and the high cost of expenses related to traditional burial.
Well, speaking as a Jew, the religion forbids cremation. I know you said earlier that you worked with a Jewish community that embraced it, but in most circles, it is very uncommon - and in traditional families, completely unheard of. (Ashes are not allowed to be buried in a Jewish cemetery, in fact.)

That said, I have seen the most elaborate, expensive caskets at the funerals of people whose families have very little money, and they have been sold the idea - in the midst of their grief - that spending thousands on a gold-plated (or whatever) casket that will be seen for a day and then buried forever is money wisely spent.

My bias is showing, but I think the Jews have it right: burial in a plain pine box. The idea behind it is that rich and poor are all equal in death as we stand before G-d, but for practical purpose, who needs to spend that money when it could better be used to help the surviving family if there are young children, or, if not, give it to charity (in memory of the deceased).
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:06 AM
 
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There are some Reform congregations that will permit cremation, because it's less expensive than formal burial and less of a financial burden on families. But I think the expectation is that the cremains be buried in the ground (so that the ashes may return to the earth), and not scattered or kept in an urn.

I personally prefer the plain coffin method and returning the un-embalmed remains to the earth. Plus, the gravestone serves as a lasting memorial to the deceased.

In the old days, we used to have burial societies (chevrei kadishei) that helped the families with these things. I don't know whether these still exist today outside of Orthodox Judaism. When I've visited old Jewish cemeteries, I've seen the sections set aside for the various burial societies.




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Old 05-23-2019, 08:23 AM
 
Location: U.S.A
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
Well, speaking as a Jew, the religion forbids cremation. I know you said earlier that you worked with a Jewish community that embraced it, but in most circles, it is very uncommon - and in traditional families, completely unheard of. (Ashes are not allowed to be buried in a Jewish cemetery, in fact.)
You may want to Google ' Jewish Cemetery Cremation '

Many Jewish cemeteries do in fact allow for cremated remains to be interred. The cremation scenario that I would reference as common, is when people are on a very tight fixed income. They simply do not have the money. This is not just Jews. Catholics and some other religions do not advocate for cremation. Our position from the standpoint of the funeral home, prevents us from interfering with the decision. We are simply there to serve the public.

I have never seen or even heard of a gold plated casket. I have seen copper glass sealer caskets that are very high end merchandise. I have seen Jews buried in them fully embalmed and dressed with open casket visitation followed by elaborate funerals.

Is it common ? - No it's not. .But it happens.

Back to common scenario. What I seem to recall was that the Jewish members would make a prearrangement for services. Our immediate cremation was $495.00 with the ashes mailed or held for up to 1 month at the funeral home. The person/family paid the bill and signed all documents ahead of the death. Sometimes many years in advance. We never hear from them. We are just following procedure without judgment or advise in these cases.

Maybe something more enlightening for this thread as we maybe have a lot of ground to cover. ( no pun intended ) Our community was also the home of an outlaw biker type gang. They too object to cremation. I personally oversaw the burial of their president when he died. They had a graveside service with over 1000 people in attendance. Several were openly dumping vast amounts of expensive whiskey, wine, beer, and even cash onto the casket after it was lowered into the ground. I can honestly say that no matter the specific case. People always treated us with respect. It's a two way street. Remaining flexible is always key.

Last edited by Jacob II; 05-23-2019 at 09:21 AM..
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