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Old 06-03-2019, 05:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Big state school. Mine in particular is known as a leader in the BDS movement.
Here's an interesting article about where Jewish parents should send their kids:

https://www.jns.org/college-search-1...ent-feel-safe/

 
Old 06-03-2019, 07:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
Here's an interesting article about where Jewish parents should send their kids:

https://www.jns.org/college-search-1...ent-feel-safe/

Thanks for that link, Rachel976! I looked for the book on Amazon and saw that it hadn't received any reviews yet. A previous edition from some years back did get a couple of reviews, mostly criticizing the poor proof-reading job done on that edition. I should think that, with this later edition, proof-reading problems have been addressed.

I'm planning to buy the book for my local public library. I see that there's a 2019-2020 edition that will be coming out soon, so I'm holding off until that one is released.

Here's an excerpt from a review of the current edition that I found, which does a good job of explaining intersectionality on college campuses today:

Quote:
Intersectionality places people into groups in accordance with their grievances against perceived systems of power and requires them to first identify as a member of an “oppressed” group, and then to unite in solidarity. On today’s campuses, pro-Palestinian activists from organizations such as Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) have utilized the intersectionality apparatus in their recruitment of minority or marginalized groups (African-Americans, women, LGBTQ individuals, etc.) to join the BDS campaign against a common “oppressor:” Israel and its proponents on campus. In many cases, liberal-minded Jewish students identify with the causes espoused by these demographic groups. However, when these groups join the anti-Israel cause, Jewish students who choose to support Israel risk being left out of campus-wide conversations on key social issues and, even worse, being shunned by alliances of students who otherwise largely share their goals and values... [One instance of anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism on American campuses in recent years include UCLA and Stanford University students being questioned about their Jewish identity during student government hearings.]

Ostrov then profiles 136 colleges and universities that are the nation’s most popular schools among Jewish students, focusing on the academic strength, setting, and appeal of the covered institutions. He divides the campuses into three categories: “large schools with significant undergraduate Jewish populations,” “small schools with significant undergraduate Jewish populations,” and “interesting schools with small undergraduate Jewish populations.”

Each profile conveys the school’s history of anti-Israel and anti-Semitic sentiment, and includes key contextual elements such as the campus’s level of BDS and SJP activity, a list of comparable schools, and how the institution was assessed in the Forward newspaper’s Jewish college guide as well as The Algemeiner website’s rankings of the best and worst colleges for Jewish students.

But Ostrov’s guide does not rank the profiled schools, nor does it assign a letter grade to each campus. Rather, the guide is a judgment-free tool for parents that will enable them to go into the college search with eyes wide open and to select a school where their children can flourish.
Finding the Right School in the Era of BDS & Intersectionality *
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,803 posts, read 10,711,160 times
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There are a few liberal arts colleges and a few state u's where BDS is a big enough deal to make any Jew (other than those who are antizionist and proclaim it) uncomfortable - though even there hillels are protective, and many Jewish kids have good experiences (and no, its not a physical danger).

But loads of state schools, almost all tech schools, and even the Ivies are not like that.

This is quite a different question than observance. There are plenty of observant Jews at most campuses with large Jewish populations - several of the Ivies, the State schools in states with large jewish populations, and quite a few others. This includes both modern Orthodox Jews and observant Conservative Jews.

For more info, from a frum friendly POV, I would contact the Chabad on any particular campus.

As for danger to the neshuma from a secular education, that obviously depends on your POV and on what kind of education one gets. You can go to an engineering school and barely take any courses other than physics math and engineering. To my way of thinking, NOT learning the liberal arts is a danger to the neshuma, and the bigger problem today is that many schools, in their attempt to show the association of Western literature with imperialism and racism, have swung a bit too far, and are not teaching enough of the Western Cannon.

Of course on most campuses people will be exposed to individuals of all backgrounds. For people from my community, that would happen to young people who did NOT go to college as well - in fact hanging out with people who did not go to college would mean being MORE isolated from other Jews.

If you want a college where someone would only be surrouned by frum Jews, I guess there is Yeshiva U, and Truro.
 
Old 06-09-2019, 10:59 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
1,133 posts, read 1,432,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
What do you think? Are colleges safe places for outwardly-identifiable Jewish kids? Safe for their guf (physical body)? Safe for their neshama (Jewish soul)? Are there ways to still get a bachelors degree and not subject your children to the extreme hatred of Jews and Torah hashkafa (outlook) found on nearly 100% of college campuses?

Wherever you choose to send your kids, you'll also have to be aware that many things may shock you, as they did me (a secular person). The living arrangements are such that males and females are in the same dorms, often on the same floor. Everyone thinks I'm an old fogey for being mortified at this. When I was in the Marine Corps 30 years ago, men were housed separately from women, as leadership knew that to put 18 year old men and women on the same floor or barracks was a bad idea. Apparently it's considered acceptable these days in universities, so there's that to consider! Of course, YMMV with a Jewish university. Brooklyn Dad and others have good advice about specifics - my advice is to make sure the kids get the most appropriate university education you can. Knowledge is power, and like your secular colleagues, you'll know that you raised them correctly before you sent them off, and you worry every day, but it's usually the right thing to do.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 06:34 AM
 
577 posts, read 57,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1+1=5 View Post
Wherever you choose to send your kids, you'll also have to be aware that many things may shock you, as they did me (a secular person). The living arrangements are such that males and females are in the same dorms, often on the same floor. Everyone thinks I'm an old fogey for being mortified at this. When I was in the Marine Corps 30 years ago, men were housed separately from women, as leadership knew that to put 18 year old men and women on the same floor or barracks was a bad idea. Apparently it's considered acceptable these days in universities, so there's that to consider! Of course, YMMV with a Jewish university. Brooklyn Dad and others have good advice about specifics - my advice is to make sure the kids get the most appropriate university education you can. Knowledge is power, and like your secular colleagues, you'll know that you raised them correctly before you sent them off, and you worry every day, but it's usually the right thing to do.

Good advice, Chana.

I think that the current policy of putting males and females in the same dorms only helps to contribute to the party atmosphere that seems to prevail on a lot of college campuses today. Maybe I'm a fogey, too, but I had to put myself through college by attending night classes and working during the day (I had a scholarship, but it wasn't enough). I never had the time to socialize on campus, or participate in demonstrations or counter-demonstrations or anything like that.

I'm not saying all that college kids want to do is party or join a political collective when they go to college – there are a lot of kids who go to college full-time and use every hour to study and work hard to achieve their degree. But I think that there are also a lot of temptations for kids who are away from home perhaps for the first time in their lives. If the kids already have a good grounding that they've received from home, though, I think that they're probably going to do well in college.

I especially agree with your last statement: Knowledge is power, and like your secular colleagues, you'll know that you raised them correctly before you sent them off, and you worry every day, but it's usually the right thing to do.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,803 posts, read 10,711,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1+1=5 View Post
The living arrangements are such that males and females are in the same dorms, often on the same floor.
This was the case 40 years ago.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 09:28 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,803 posts, read 10,711,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
I think that the current policy of putting males and females in the same dorms only helps to contribute to the party atmosphere that seems to prevail on a lot of college campuses today.
From what I can gather the most intense party scenes take place at all male fraternities. In general I think the level of academic intensity, and other factors are more important. And again, coed dorms go back over 40 years.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 11:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
And again, coed dorms go back over 40 years.

That would've been in "the swinging seventies"? I'll bet it was a problem back then, too.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,803 posts, read 10,711,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
That would've been in "the swinging seventies"? I'll bet it was a problem back then, too.

The 1970s, the 1980s, and the 1990s as well.

I don't recall it as a problem. Most people dated people who were not from their dorm. I mean it DID mean that colleges could not enforce rules against opposite sex overnight visitors, but then that was not happening any more for single sex dorms, or even for most single sex colleges. And dating is a rather different issue from what most people think of as "partying" - IE drinking and drug usage, which do not require members of the opposite sex.

Clearly if you want to insure that your 18 to 21 year old children remain virgins, then pretty much any secular college is not a place you want them residing, whatever the arrangement of dormitories is.
 
Old 06-10-2019, 01:04 PM
 
2,049 posts, read 862,636 times
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College is a place for new ideas and experiences, away from the influence of your parents. It's not a place for ensuring students will have the same ideas and experiences as they had when they arrived. If that is the OP's goal, then let the kids live at home and commute to a large city university with a sizeable Jewish population where their dress code will be accepted. You can visit the campus with your child, find someone who is dressed like an observant Jew and ask them how they fit in. If your child does not dress differently than non religious students, then their religion is their own business. Going to college as a commuter is mainly for students who are just there to get a degree, leading to employment. I'm not sure why the OP wants to protect their child from the secular world. What happens when they graduate? Do they spend their whole life under their parents' influence or do they get to live their own life?

Last edited by bobspez; 06-10-2019 at 01:17 PM..
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