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Old 08-21-2019, 09:33 AM
 
83 posts, read 14,578 times
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I wouldn’t give my maiden name to a stranger , only because that’s a security question on a lot of sites. Mine is German and my mom’s is Greek, so no one would guess those to break in any of my secured sites. I’m glad my maiden name isn’t Smith or Jones, too easy to crack.
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Old 08-21-2019, 09:45 AM
 
Location: US
28,217 posts, read 15,269,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pumpkin mouse View Post
I wish my mom was Jewish , practice-wise( Is that a word?), not considered Jewish just because her grandmother used to be.
In my earlier post, I didn’t mean “code word “ literally. I should of put it in parentheses.
I just heard that some Jews don’t consider other Jews, Jewish.
That’s with a lot of stuff too though, not just religion. ( What’s “ authentic “ and what’s not)
I’m just going by a few things I read( which is why I’m glad I found you guys, to get real views from the “ horses mouth”, so to speak. )
I’ve been reading the books “ Becoming frum” by Sarah Benor and “The non- Orthodox Jews guide to Orthodox Jews”by David Baum and I just got the impression that they think differently towards Jews who aren’t Orthodox, as far as being real Jews.
It didn’t matter if they were converts or born Conservative or Reform.
I know, there are people like that in any group.
I believe Satmars definarely fit this bill...
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:19 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
1,208 posts, read 1,451,088 times
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Well, there are many possibilities and considerations. as you can see. I'm glad I'm not in charge of who is Jewish and who isn't. I figure G-d and the Rabbi can sort it out. Just talk to the Rabbi about it. Good luck. PM!
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:52 PM
 
429 posts, read 131,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
I believe Satmars definarely fit this bill...
I don't. I'd have to see some evidence. AFAIK, they are orthodox and know the halachah. Not saying they mightn't be a bit negative on R & C practice and belief, and know that R does not follow halachic standards of conversion. But I have not seen evidence that Satmar chasidim don't know who is & isn't a Jew, by halachah.
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Old 08-21-2019, 02:07 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
1,208 posts, read 1,451,088 times
Reputation: 831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pumpkin mouse View Post
I just heard that some Jews don’t consider other Jews, Jewish.
That’s with a lot of stuff too though, not just religion. ( What’s “ authentic “ and what’s not)
I’m just going by a few things I read( which is why I’m glad I found you guys, to get real views from the “ horses mouth”, so to speak. )
I’ve been reading the books “ Becoming frum” by Sarah Benor and “The non- Orthodox Jews guide to Orthodox Jews”by David Baum and I just got the impression that they think differently towards Jews who aren’t Orthodox, as far as being real Jews.
It didn’t matter if they were converts or born Conservative or Reform.
I know, there are people like that in any group.

Here's how I handle that.

This situation is just like Eunice at the water cooler at work. Eunice*, while you're trying to work, tries to come up to you and tell you all sorts of gossip about your friend. Eunice is speaking from her yetzer hara, not on behalf of G-d or any religion. It's important, as a loyal friend to the people that are being gossiped about, to tell Eunice that you don't want to hear about it, and you have work to do. You do - working on your own middos. It's our duty, whatever the snarky comment or loshan hara, to shut it down. We shut it down on behalf of our Reform brothers and sisters, our Conservative brothers and sisters, and our Orthodox, Chassid, Satmar brothers and sisters. All that matters is that we're a family, and no one talks trash about your family. Don't let people poison your mind or your thoughts with anything when they try to make divisive generalizations. You don't have time to listen to that, and you don't want to hear it anyway.

If *you're* having a rough day and are tempted to make those remarks, remember that we don't know the future. The Orthodox man we're gossiping about now may one day pull our child from a fire, heaven forbid. We just don't know. You don't seem like the type of person that would talk badly about someone else; I'm just speaking for myself because I can have a really sharp tongue sometimes. The bottom line is that we don't know what our future holds.

Forgive the pontificating on my part, please.



*Apologies to anyone here named 'Eunice'.
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Old 08-22-2019, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,325 posts, read 12,846,515 times
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OP, thanks for starting this thread; I have found it really interesting. Some thirty years ago when I was living in Berkeley California, I was going through a conversion with the Hillel rabbi, but also went to the Orthodox synagogue sometimes (where I often felt quite out of place).

But this gives me pause ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by theflipflop View Post
Of course this depends on what kind of conversation the mother had. If it was a conversion that did not include a lifelong commitment to observe all 613 mitzvos (and saying all wine and cheese in America is kosher, or driving to shul on Shabbos - those disqualify you as having had a proper halachic conversion), then you are not going to be universally accepted as a Jew. And not counted in a minyan of 10 Jewish men.
In Berkeley, I walked to the Orthodox synagogue (although IIRC it was quite a hike, while Hillel was literally across the street from International House, where I lived). But I am wondering how many ORTHODOX Jews simply don't have a choice about driving to shul because they live far away from one. I know the traditional answer was "You should live within walking distance" but in many, I would guess MOST, areas in the U.S., that is simply not possible. (For example, here in New Hampshire, the nearest Orthodox synagogue is an hour and a half away by car -- impossible to walk to.) So what do you do?
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:25 PM
 
Location: NJ
1,477 posts, read 514,414 times
Reputation: 622
Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
OP, thanks for starting this thread; I have found it really interesting. Some thirty years ago when I was living in Berkeley California, I was going through a conversion with the Hillel rabbi, but also went to the Orthodox synagogue sometimes (where I often felt quite out of place).

But this gives me pause ...



In Berkeley, I walked to the Orthodox synagogue (although IIRC it was quite a hike, while Hillel was literally across the street from International House, where I lived). But I am wondering how many ORTHODOX Jews simply don't have a choice about driving to shul because they live far away from one. I know the traditional answer was "You should live within walking distance" but in many, I would guess MOST, areas in the U.S., that is simply not possible. (For example, here in New Hampshire, the nearest Orthodox synagogue is an hour and a half away by car -- impossible to walk to.) So what do you do?
An Orthodox Jew, one who wishes to be Orthodox in thought and act, will live within walking distance or just not go.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Booth Texas
15,373 posts, read 5,142,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosends View Post
An Orthodox Jew, one who wishes to be Orthodox in thought and act, will live within walking distance or just not go.
What about if a Gentile drives them?
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Old 08-22-2019, 09:03 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
1,208 posts, read 1,451,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannibal Flavius View Post
What about if a Gentile drives them?

No. You can't ask a non-Jew to do something that you're forbidden to do.
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Old 08-23-2019, 08:02 AM
 
83 posts, read 14,578 times
Reputation: 20
(This makes me think of the Amish, who get others to drive them places. )
I was thinking the same thing at first, to get a gentile to drive them, because a lot of the commandments only pertain to Jews , then only in certain diaspora areas.
I then answered my own question, “ Duh, Observing the Sabbath IS for everyone!”
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