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Old 08-27-2019, 05:49 PM
 
810 posts, read 96,940 times
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I've just ordered from Amazon this book: Things We Couldn't Say, by Diet Eman.

https://www.amazon.com/Things-Couldn...s%2C140&sr=8-1

It was recommended to me by a friend, and it's "the true story of Diet [pronounced Deet] Eman, a young Dutch woman who, with her fiance, Hein Sietsma, risked everything to rescue Jews imperiled by Nazi persecution in occupied Holland during World War II. Throughout the years that Diet and Hein aided the Resistance - work that would cost Diet her freedom and Hein his life - their courageous effort ultimately saved the lives of hundreds of Dutch Jews."

In 1998 Israel presented Diet Eman with the Righteous Among the Nations award, which as you probably already know is given to non-Jews who risked their lives during the Holocaust in order to save Jews.

When it comes to the Righteous Among the Nations, I'm sure that most people have heard of Oskar Schindler, thanks to Steven Spielberg's movie Schindler's List. But I have to admit that I hadn't heard of Diet Eman before, until my friend told me about her.

Do you have a favorite true story about a recipient of the Righteous Among the Nations award that you'd like to recommend? I (and probably others here) would really like to hear about it!
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:45 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
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I'll have to check that out. Thanks!

I am intrigued with the story of Chiune Sugihara, a gentle, kind Japanese man that went across the grain in a society that pressured him to conform. In 1939, he was sent to Lithuania, where he worked at the consulate and wrote visas. He wrote so many every day that his hands cramped and his wife had to massage them. He was estimated to have saved 40,000 Jews who were sent through Japan to other (safe) countries (I believe that's how it worked). After the war, he lost his job, and worked at menial jobs. No one knew he was a hero, and he never brought it up. He did not think he did anything extraordinary. Here's a brief synopsis:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/15/o...-refugees.html
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: small Southern town balabusta
1,208 posts, read 1,451,088 times
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And Count Andrey Szeptycki was a Greek Orthodox church Archbishop elder who hid Jews in monastaries in the Ukraine. He initially, during the early 1940s, believed that German rule would be better than Russian rule, but he saw how the Jews were treated and then rebelled against the treatment of the Jewish people, and at one time, he sent a letter to Heimrich Himmler. He instructed the monastaries and convents that worked under his supervision to also help shelter the Jewish people. Numerous good works and writings were attributed to him. (Sorry my summaries are a bit lame. Have been writing all day).





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Old 08-27-2019, 11:29 PM
 
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I don’t know if all of these actually got an award, but they all were involved with saving Jewish lives. Most of these are probably well known , like Miep Gies. I’m glad that she lived to an old age.
I have: “ Dangerous Diplomacy” , about Carl Lutz, a Swiss National who saved a lot of Jews in Hungary.
“ The boys who challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen & the Churchill Club”
“ A conspiracy of Decency: The rescue of the Danish Jews during WW2.
“ Irena’s Children”, and “ Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project, both about Irena Sendler . She saved lots of Jewish Children.
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Old Yesterday, 06:48 AM
 
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Thanks, Chana and Pumpkin, for your great recommendations!

The website for Yad Vashem (The World Holocaust Remembrance Center, located in Jerusalem) provides a list of the (so far) 27,362 individuals who have received the title of Righteous Among the Nations.

https://www.yadvashem.org/righteous/statistics.html

@Chana: There's a Sempo Sugihara listed for Japan who received the title of Righteous in 1984. He's the only one so far from Japan. Could he be the same person as the Chiune Sugihara whom you mentioned?

@Pumpkin: I also found your good people on the list of the Righteous:
Carl and Gertrud Lutz from Switzerland in 1964
Jan and Miep Gies from the Netherlands in 1972
Irena Sendler from Poland in 1965
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Old Today, 08:38 PM
 
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I’m going through some more books.
The book “ The girl in the green sweater, a life in Holocaust’s shadow “ by Krystyna Chiger , told about her family and other families living below the streets , in the sewers. She told about a guy named Leopard Socha, who would bring supplies for them to live off of. That got made into a movie called “ In Darkness “ The director’s mother was in the Polish resistance movement and was part of the 1944 Warsaw ghetto uprising. She was rewarded the “ Righteous among the Nations” The director’s name is Agnieszka Holland.
There’s also the book “ The boy on the wooden box “, he’s one of the children on Schlintler’s list, Leon Leyson. The last book is “ A girl called Renee: The incredible story of a Holocaust survivor
She was an underground fighter who rescued Jews.
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