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Old 10-03-2019, 09:25 PM
 
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In my area, 2 synagogues decided to merge and sell off each of their 60 year old buildings to build a new one to hopefully attract more people and to build it to today's style. Here is a pic - https://st1.ning.com/topology/rest/1...ofile=original


https://jewishstandard.timesofisrael...nd-a-new-name/


here is a whole article on it



What is everyone's opinion? Many of the synagogues today are approaching 60 years or older....do you think money should be invested in renovating them? Would it make a difference for you?
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Old 10-04-2019, 06:21 AM
 
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This is what's happening with my own congregation right now. The numbers of congregants have dwindled and we can no longer afford the mortgage on our building. Plus, our building needs a lot of expensive repairs. Our building is not old enough to garner any kind of historical status, so there would be no state funding coming to help preserve it. (I'm glad that very old synagogues like New York City's Eldridge Street Synagogue has been preserved as a designated National Historic Landmark).

We will soon be using the synagogue of another nearby (and also dwindling) Jewish congregation in this new year, thanks to their kind invitation. There are no immediate plans to merge the two congregations, but the possibility exists. At the very least, we will be combining resources to keep our Jewish communities alive and vibrant.

The building that we worship in is not important – it's the congregation that matters most. Of course we'll miss our beautiful synagogue, but not nearly as much as we would miss each other if we had no other place to gather together.
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Old 10-05-2019, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
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Here in Israel in the Old Yishuv synagogue I've been going to in Jerusalem, outside of having electricity probably looks the same as it did 100+ years ago. The ones that I go to in the New Yishuv when visiting others are simple and basic. Even the (last one before leaving NYC) Orthodox one I went to in the UWS externally had basic architecture. If I think back to all the synagogues I went to in NYC, they were all externally conservative and internally upgraded conservatively for better lighting, upgraded seating and some repairs that ended up being upgrades (due to building code changes).

I really don't get these liberal Jews who for some reason have to have a building that looks like goyish church.
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Old 10-05-2019, 08:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Here in Israel in the Old Yishuv synagogue I've been going to in Jerusalem, outside of having electricity probably looks the same as it did 100+ years ago. The ones that I go to in the New Yishuv when visiting others are simple and basic. Even the (last one before leaving NYC) Orthodox one I went to in the UWS externally had basic architecture. If I think back to all the synagogues I went to in NYC, they were all externally conservative and internally upgraded conservatively for better lighting, upgraded seating and some repairs that ended up being upgrades (due to building code changes).

I really don't get these liberal Jews who for some reason have to have a building that looks like goyish church.

I know, right? The modern-style, churchy buildings don't impress me. My favorite services are actually the ones that we have outdoors. Sukkot is one of my favorite holidays on account of that, as I especially love it when we have services (and a communal meal) in the huge outdoor sukkah. There's something really special about sitting down together under the sukkah, seeing the stars come out through the netting overhead, feeling the crisp autumn air, and sharing food and wine with each other. At least, that's how we do it in my congregation. I don't know if everyone does it the same. It's hard to do that in the city, so I'm especially glad that we meet in the countryside.
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Old 10-06-2019, 04:07 AM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,491 posts, read 24,595,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
I know, right? The modern-style, churchy buildings don't impress me. My favorite services are actually the ones that we have outdoors. Sukkot is one of my favorite holidays on account of that, as I especially love it when we have services (and a communal meal) in the huge outdoor sukkah. There's something really special about sitting down together under the sukkah, seeing the stars come out through the netting overhead, feeling the crisp autumn air, and sharing food and wine with each other. At least, that's how we do it in my congregation. I don't know if everyone does it the same. It's hard to do that in the city, so I'm especially glad that we meet in the countryside.
Within the city, it was done at the Yeshivas who had play areas. The play area's had the Sukkahs. Sukkahs in NYC are abundant, you just need to know where to look.

https://www.6sqft.com/sukkot-archite...and-locations/

https://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2...-the-holidays/

https://www.chabadmidtown.com/templa...-Manhattan.htm

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2019/10/...-public-space/

etc...
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Old 10-06-2019, 07:18 AM
 
1,033 posts, read 137,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Within the city, it was done at the Yeshivas who had play areas. The play area's had the Sukkahs. Sukkahs in NYC are abundant, you just need to know where to look.

https://www.6sqft.com/sukkot-archite...and-locations/

https://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2...-the-holidays/

https://www.chabadmidtown.com/templa...-Manhattan.htm

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2019/10/...-public-space/

etc...

I love the creativity that goes into making all these sukkos in limited spaces! Thanks for posting those links! Still, you can't really see many (if any) stars at night when you're in the city, due to the light pollution. Here's a pic I took of our last year's sukkah out in the countryside. As you can see, ours is more of the open-air variety, although we have it built up against the synagogue for at least a couple solid walls.

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Old 10-06-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: US
28,403 posts, read 15,489,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel NewYork View Post
I love the creativity that goes into making all these sukkos in limited spaces! Thanks for posting those links! Still, you can't really see many (if any) stars at night when you're in the city, due to the light pollution. Here's a pic I took of our last year's sukkah out in the countryside. As you can see, ours is more of the open-air variety, although we have it built up against the synagogue for at least a couple solid walls.
Thatís beautiful...
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Old 10-06-2019, 09:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
That’s beautiful...

Thanks, Richard! The members of our congregation are all beautiful, too (in many different ways), but I blocked out their faces in the picture for their privacy.

You can practically see the peace emanating from the setting in that picture. It's why I love our Jewish congregation so very much.
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Old 10-06-2019, 01:21 PM
 
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Beautiful! But I am having trouble seeing the walls from here.
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Old 10-06-2019, 02:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ben Shunamit View Post
Beautiful! But I am having trouble seeing the walls from here.

Thank you! I cropped the picture because there were too many people standing around against the outer walls of the synagogue and I didn't feel like blocking out all those faces as well, for privacy. The sukkah isn't quite a perfect square, either.
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