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Old 07-26-2010, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
448 posts, read 1,224,789 times
Reputation: 81

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No intentions to "whitewash" history. I am African-American and I lived in Lee's Summit as a child with my father, an A-A historian and very active activist in KC since the 1970's. I am sure he heard the history of the name, but never once mentioned it and although I always assumed that was the history of the name without ever being told the story it never crossed my mind as an factor in the city's make up today.

I understand you stating it as a potential fact and thank you for pointing out that part of history of Lee's Summit. Do you know anything else interesting about the city's history that might be interesting to people looking in that part of the city?
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Old 07-26-2010, 10:45 PM
 
400 posts, read 843,366 times
Reputation: 390
You're being too kind to me. I should not have brought it up.

Atchison, Kansas is also named after a Confederate. So it cuts both ways.

Carry on the conversation about Lee's Summit. Sorry to sidetrack the conversation.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Murderer/Bushwhacker/outlaw Cole Younger lived out his post-prison days in Lee's Summit and is buried less than a mile from my house, off downtown.
Doesn't make the community any less of a nice place to live in 2010, nor does the purported namesake. History is ugly, no matter who your town is (allegedly) named after. Maybe the place could just be renamed Methenyburg, but then you'd **** off all the people who hate jazz and white 'fros.
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:22 PM
 
13 posts, read 29,130 times
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As a resident of Lee's Summit, I would like to point out that the community was named after Dr. Pleasant John Graves Lea. It was, for a few month's Lea's Summit as the depot for the new Union Pacific railroad was built on land that included his farm. The railroad, misprinted the town's name on the sign and in subsquent time schedules as "Lees" Summit (without the apostrophe) and the name stuck. There is no connection to the Robert E. Lee.
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:29 PM
 
13 posts, read 29,130 times
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Back to the topic. Lee's Summit has always reminded me of Boulder, CO. Many young families and while not a ton of singles, Lee's Summit's residents tend to be younger families. Consequently, the city's population is constantly on the move--from the dozens of miles of bike and hiking trails, numerous lakes, city pools, private neighborhood pools and the downtown area which is perfect for walking and shopping. It has just now appeared on the map of renewable energy as the future headquarters of a $90 million renewable energy factory which will make large rechargeable batteries.
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:04 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,054 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC lover View Post
As a resident of Lee's Summit, I would like to point out that the community was named after Dr. Pleasant John Graves Lea. It was, for a few month's Lea's Summit as the depot for the new Union Pacific railroad was built on land that included his farm. The railroad, misprinted the town's name on the sign and in subsquent time schedules as "Lees" Summit (without the apostrophe) and the name stuck. There is no connection to the Robert E. Lee.
As a historian, I would like to point out that Lee's Summit was named in 1862, three years before a town was even planned. A Confederate Colonel Holt set up a recruiting station on the high ground of what was then prairie. An enormous flag was flown from a 50 foot pole and could be seen by the union garrison occupying Independence. That flag is believed to be the first flag design adopted by the Confederacy. By 1862 the Confederacy had adopted a different design and the flag (the one we are all so familiar with) belonged only to the Army of Northern Virginia, from that time to the end of the war, commanded by General Robert E. Lee. Next time you drive south from the Independence square, gaze across the vast Little Blue River valley at the Unity Village in Lee's Summit, and you will understand.

The town Strother, planned in 1865 on a barren prairie of the "Burnt District, had its name changed to Lee's summit in 1867 by residents for a number of reasons. One is that the returning population to the area was overwhelmingly southern, and wished to commemorate sufferance and sacrifice in a struggle that took nearly everything they had. Another is familiarity with the areas former name (they could not get away from it), and also the events that had taken place a few years before.

In 1862, there were no German populations in the area as they were persecuted as immigrant "yankee dutchmen" by area partisans. Only later, after "Lee's Summit" was the name of the incorporated town, did large populations of germans arrive. Thousands of German immigrants had been killed during the Civil War by Partisan Rangers and therefore a predudiced effort to change or distort the true history began early in the towns making, even as early as the last bushwhacker reunion held in the town. Today, many in the town wish to disassociate themselves from what they see as a controversial orgin or because of loyalty to northern ancestry and therefore are willing to perpetuate the false versions.

Another thing I would like to point out to the "long time resident of Lee's Summit" is that it's founders, generations before him, were intelligent people and could spell very well.
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Source?

I've heard/read both explanations, re: the identity of the Lee/Lea in question, but never with any compelling, credible source for the information identified. It doesn't really matter to me either way, as a transplant who has one side of the family that's so Yankee, it goes back to the Massachussets Bay Colony, and one side that's dyed in the wool Alabama Confederates. But I do wonder how the real story behind LS's name is verified.
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Old 09-24-2011, 11:06 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,054 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1bushwhacker View Post
As a historian, I would like to point out that Lee's Summit was named in 1862, three years before a town was even planned. A Confederate Colonel Holt set up a recruiting station on the high ground of what was then prairie. An enormous flag was flown from a 50 foot pole and could be seen by the union garrison occupying Independence. That flag is believed to be the first flag design adopted by the Confederacy. By 1862 the Confederacy had adopted a different design and the flag (the one we are all so familiar with) belonged only to the Army of Northern Virginia, from that time to the end of the war, commanded by General Robert E. Lee. Next time you drive south from the Independence square, gaze across the vast Little Blue River valley at the Unity Village in Lee's Summit, and you will understand.

The town Strother, planned in 1865 on a barren prairie of the "Burnt District, had its name changed to Lee's summit in 1867 by residents for a number of reasons. One is that the returning population to the area was overwhelmingly southern, and wished to commemorate sufferance and sacrifice in a struggle that took nearly everything they had. Another is familiarity with the areas former name (they could not get away from it), and also the events that had taken place a few years before.

In 1862, there were no German populations in the area as they were persecuted as immigrant "yankee dutchmen" by area partisans. Only later, after "Lee's Summit" was the name of the incorporated town, did large populations of germans arrive. Thousands of German immigrants had been killed during the Civil War by Partisan Rangers and therefore a predudiced effort to change or distort the true history began early in the towns making, even as early as the last bushwhacker reunion held in the town. Today, many in the town wish to disassociate themselves from what they see as a controversial orgin or because of loyalty to northern ancestry and therefore are willing to perpetuate the false versions.

Another thing I would like to point out to the "long time resident of Lee's Summit" is that it's founders, generations before him, were intelligent people and could spell very well.
The sign "Lea's Summit" was the railroads error, quickly recognized by those unanimus voters of Lee's Summit, and changed as soon as a new sign could be made.
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Old 09-04-2012, 01:58 AM
 
7 posts, read 12,503 times
Reputation: 39
Default reality.

Being mixed, we dont call ourselves african americans. Ive never been to africa. My middle name is Lee, probably my white grandma's family started that with robert E lee. I honestly do not care. The reason I am making this post is because the facts are way gone. DR. Lea owned the land that the depot was located and his family called it lea's depot. It was on a hill and later called lee's summit. you can wikipedia the town and learn the truth or at least closer than u will find on some people's wild imaginary history of the town. I am black,mixed,oreo, etc But im not african. Is this town racist.. naww. not like buffalo ny where every burb is 99.9 percent white and hate seeing mixed couples. I stayed in blue springs 9 months and loved it. There are a few places around the lake where people will stare... like I said compare that to hamburg or orchard park in new york.. This area isnt racist at all, they are just a little country.. Great bbq.. great lifestyle...
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Old 07-11-2014, 11:48 AM
 
10 posts, read 14,829 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Considering it's the suburb of choice for middle and upper middle class African American families (as well as white families), I don't think it really matters today .
This is interesting. Do you mean that most affluent AA families choose Lee's Summit over other KC suburbs? We are a mixed family and this sounds promising for sure. I know that midwest cities are segregated so this sounds great.
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