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Old 09-19-2010, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
448 posts, read 1,224,180 times
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There are a few period subdivisions with homes similar to the style of these, they don't always have the all the details, but they do have the style. There are two period style subdivisions in Liberty and one in Lee's Summit off 150 hwy. And new longview is another subdivision like this. Not sure where there are others, but it was a great trend a few years ago. I found the prices were outrageous, so I'm not sure if the trend will continue, but you can find these types of houses. There are also a few sprinkled as Samatha stated in Prarie Village/ Leawood and north where older homes have been torn down and built what I call period Craftsman style. I also know of two homes like these on Redbridge just east of Blue River rd.
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Old 09-21-2010, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Much more appealing than a vinyl sided box or stuccoed mcmansion. Also, T-111 siding is still used in some newer construction which is just unbelievable considering it was considered bad 20-30 years ago.
I was shocked to see that crappy siding used so much in JoCo. It's horrible and warps, doesn't hold paint. My parents bought a new house in Olathe and while theirs is all stucco, many nearby have this crappy siding on the sides/back. Makes the houses look like giant tool sheds.

You'll see a lot of this traditional architecture on new homes in the Denver area, my own being an example. I think part of the issue is that it costs more to build homes with architectural detailing. All of the houses in my neighborhood have traditional architecture, and that includes the sides and backs of the homes. Inside we have hardwood floors throughout, very substantial, traditional baseboards and trim work, etc. It makes the home cost more per square foot I'm sure. In markets where people prefer quantity over quality, you'll get more vinyl sided, ugly carpet, cookie cutter houses.
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Old 09-21-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Tower Grove East, St. Louis, MO
12,064 posts, read 27,204,220 times
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^^ Actually properly installed vinyl siding will laste far longer and require significantly less maintenance than stucco -- at least in our climate.

Vinyl is ugly as hell, but as a low-end building material it makes a lot of sense.
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Old 09-21-2010, 05:35 PM
 
Location: IN
20,168 posts, read 34,473,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aragx6 View Post
^^ Actually properly installed vinyl siding will laste far longer and require significantly less maintenance than stucco -- at least in our climate.

Vinyl is ugly as hell, but as a low-end building material it makes a lot of sense.
Stucco has no business being used as a building material in KC with the humid wet climate. That along with extreme temperature fluctuations (freeze/thaw cycles).
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Old 09-21-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
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Originally Posted by aragx6 View Post
^^ Actually properly installed vinyl siding will laste far longer and require significantly less maintenance than stucco -- at least in our climate.

Vinyl is ugly as hell, but as a low-end building material it makes a lot of sense.
Right, but the point that T111 is crap is valid, all around. It's essentially plywood. I grew up with a carpenter parent who restored vintage homes for a living. It kills me to see these sprawling subdivisions of snout-house McMansions...covered in T111, because the builders bank on people just not knowing any better. Cheap. With the amount of moisture around here, your "siding" will look like a dime store paperback left out in the rain in no time. If you're going to buy a massive house, wouldn't you want it sided with something a little less ghetto?
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Old 09-22-2010, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Tower Grove East, St. Louis, MO
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I was talking about vinyl siding not T111 -- apparently I only read about half of Granite Stater's response.

I'm from St. Louis, so I have a special place in my heart for brick homes. Other than a tuckpointing every 30 years, you're done. I would much prefer a smaller brick home than a big, poorly made home. But obviously size has become a major deciding factor for Americans.
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Old 09-22-2010, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Stucco has no business being used as a building material in KC with the humid wet climate. That along with extreme temperature fluctuations (freeze/thaw cycles).
Why? You have tons of very old stucco homes in South Florida. Seems to do fine in the wet humidity. And there are plenty of examples of old stucco homes in KC with original stucco. What about all the stucco on buildings on the Plaza? I've never seen any buildings there being re-stuccoed, and they've got to be around 90 years old by now. Stucco is quite common here in Denver. Just because the temperature fluctuates doesn't mean stucco pops off the house!
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Old 09-22-2010, 05:49 PM
 
Location: IN
20,168 posts, read 34,473,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Why? You have tons of very old stucco homes in South Florida. Seems to do fine in the wet humidity. And there are plenty of examples of old stucco homes in KC with original stucco. What about all the stucco on buildings on the Plaza? I've never seen any buildings there being re-stuccoed, and they've got to be around 90 years old by now. Stucco is quite common here in Denver. Just because the temperature fluctuates doesn't mean stucco pops off the house!
I have seen a lot of stuccoed exterior cracks in suburban houses and I assumed it had something to do with cold temperatures and moisture. I don't know if this is a widespread problem or just a result of inferior construction.
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Old 09-23-2010, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I have seen a lot of stuccoed exterior cracks in suburban houses and I assumed it had something to do with cold temperatures and moisture. I don't know if this is a widespread problem or just a result of inferior construction.
I don't think it has to do with weather or moisture. These days I'd bet it's more likely inferior construction. I'd like a stucco home, and there are some in our neighborhood. They don't need painting very often and I believe they go decades before fading. My house has that hardy board siding and so far I'm quite pleased with it. 5 years old and it looks like new, just needs a power wash. The hardy board looks so similar to real wood and I believe it's made of wood and cement together. It goes up just like wood and holds paint very well. It's very common in Colorado.
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Old 09-23-2010, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Tower Grove East, St. Louis, MO
12,064 posts, read 27,204,220 times
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I'll admit to not knowing a lot about stucco, but I too have heard that it doesn't hold up well in this climate. A quick google search provided the following:

Quote:
Moisture is the enemy of stucco, and elements such as snow, freezing rain and ice can quickly damage stucco. From the outside, snow, rain and melting ice are absorbed into the stucco, causing it to swell and bulge. It can also cause the stucco to separate from the wall, creating a pocket inside the wall where moisture can become trapped and do additional damage. Once moisture has soaked into or penetrated the stucco, shifting temperatures do additional damage, causing the stucco to crack as the water it retains shrinks and expands with the weather.


How Does Stucco Exterior Fare in Winter Climates? | eHow.com
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