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Old 01-16-2012, 12:16 PM
 
5 posts, read 12,920 times
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Hey all,

I had really appreciated the information about the area we are considering in Kansas City, KS....so I was hoping you might be able to shed some light on Raytown, MO. Again, we have two girls under the age of 5 and we are wanting a home in an area with good schools, and a place where we can all feel safe and there is a sense of community. Now that I think of this I should have posted it in the Missouri catagory...oh well.
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Old 01-17-2012, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,195,578 times
Reputation: 2549
Quote:
Originally Posted by misspiggy72 View Post
Hey all,

I had really appreciated the information about the area we are considering in Kansas City, KS....so I was hoping you might be able to shed some light on Raytown, MO. Again, we have two girls under the age of 5 and we are wanting a home in an area with good schools, and a place where we can all feel safe and there is a sense of community. Now that I think of this I should have posted it in the Missouri catagory...oh well.
You're choices of where to look into for relocation are interesting and a bit atypical. Both are very blue-collar/working-class areas, which is fine, just not places that pop up on here so often. The only thing I can put together between the two places (KCK and Raytown) is the bargains on houses.

I think Raytown is a better choice out of the two. It's more active, more connected to the rest of the metro, and provides a lot more retail and better schools. As for the differences in schools in Raytown, you'd have to ask somebody else. Being that you seem interested in older houses and areas with historical character, I would definitely look into northern Raytown (north of 63rd, along the Blue Ridge BLVD and Sterling corridors). In that area you'll find mature-tree lined streets, established early suburban neighborhoods (1940s-1960's-ish), with a mixture of even older houses (bungalows, small tudors, a few two stories, etc.), which are mostly centered along Blue Ridge BLVD. Although there are older houses scattered about all over Raytown. You can probably even find older houses that are on big lots and almost semi-rural feeling because they existed before suburban development surrounded them. And BTW, a lot of the older 50's-ish suburban houses in northern Raytown actually are a bit upscale and have a lot of character and are a decent size, but they definitely are still a bargain. Raytown actually has a small downtown at about 63rd and Raytown Rd and there have been proposals in the past to redevelop it, but nothing has taken off yet. Also, there's a lot of underlying history in the area, which if you really looked into might be interesting. Raytown was historically a white working-class area but has slowly been an area for black families to move to to seek better education for their kids, etc, which they were just under 12% in 2000 and now may be as much as 18%. It's a whiter place than I realized. Another interesting stat is that only 20% of the population has bachelor's degrees (or higher). The population peaked at over 33,000 in 1970 (as with most working-class areas), but has actually stayed very stable at around 30,000. One other thing, I keep referring to Raytown as "working-class", but as for employment I don't think there are any industrial areas in Raytown or even anywhere near it.

If you don't know already, Reece and Nichol's (big local realtors) have a really good way of searching properties by map. If you haven't, you should go check it out. Reece & Nichols Real Estate, Mortgage and Title Experts | Kansas City Homes for Sale with Reece & Nichols.
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,493,517 times
Reputation: 5409
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
You're choices of where to look into for relocation are interesting and a bit atypical. Both are very blue-collar/working-class areas, which is fine, just not places that pop up on here so often. The only thing I can put together between the two places (KCK and Raytown) is the bargains on houses.

I think Raytown is a better choice out of the two. It's more active, more connected to the rest of the metro, and provides a lot more retail and better schools. As for the differences in schools in Raytown, you'd have to ask somebody else. Being that you seem interested in older houses and areas with historical character, I would definitely look into northern Raytown (north of 63rd, along the Blue Ridge BLVD and Sterling corridors). In that area you'll find mature-tree lined streets, established early suburban neighborhoods (1940s-1960's-ish), with a mixture of even older houses (bungalows, small tudors, a few two stories, etc.), which are mostly centered along Blue Ridge BLVD. Although there are older houses scattered about all over Raytown. You can probably even find older houses that are on big lots and almost semi-rural feeling because they existed before suburban development surrounded them. And BTW, a lot of the older 50's-ish suburban houses in northern Raytown actually are a bit upscale and have a lot of character and are a decent size, but they definitely are still a bargain. Raytown actually has a small downtown at about 63rd and Raytown Rd and there have been proposals in the past to redevelop it, but nothing has taken off yet. Also, there's a lot of underlying history in the area, which if you really looked into might be interesting. Raytown was historically a white working-class area but has slowly been an area for black families to move to to seek better education for their kids, etc, which they were just under 12% in 2000 and now may be as much as 18%. It's a whiter place than I realized. Another interesting stat is that only 20% of the population has bachelor's degrees (or higher). The population peaked at over 33,000 in 1970 (as with most working-class areas), but has actually stayed very stable at around 30,000. One other thing, I keep referring to Raytown as "working-class", but as for employment I don't think there are any industrial areas in Raytown or even anywhere near it.

If you don't know already, Reece and Nichol's (big local realtors) have a really good way of searching properties by map. If you haven't, you should go check it out. Reece & Nichols Real Estate, Mortgage and Title Experts | Kansas City Homes for Sale with Reece & Nichols.
great post mokan!
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:12 PM
 
5 posts, read 12,920 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks again Mokan...and you are right...the deals on the size of the homes and lots are interesting to us...we have also found homes we like in Lees Summit...so again, not being able to get there and get a feel for these places is rather scarey...we will have about a 2 day span to look around the Kansas City area and the houses that we are interested in....not a lot of time to really get a feel for the areas or a sense of the community. So again, thank you for your thurough information.
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Old 02-24-2012, 07:47 AM
 
8 posts, read 14,445 times
Reputation: 10
misspiggy72,
I was just wondering what you found out on your visit to the area. We are also looking at relocating to this area and (just like you!) will only have about 2 days to make a decision on a community/home. The thought has my stomach in knots! If you could give us any insight from your trip it would be GREATLY appreciated!
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Old 02-24-2012, 11:18 AM
 
99 posts, read 193,737 times
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If you like some places in Lees Summit I would stop looking in Raytown. I can't think of a single reason anyone would rather live in Raytown than LS. Schools don't even come close enough to compare.
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
592 posts, read 1,846,846 times
Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by racer56 View Post
If you like some places in Lees Summit I would stop looking in Raytown. I can't think of a single reason anyone would rather live in Raytown than LS. Schools don't even come close enough to compare.

This..

And, with the size of the area, I'd probably try to rent for at least a little while.


That said, I've lived in Small Town NE KS, Lawrence, KS, Lenexa, KS, Knoxville TN and now Lee's Summit, MO.

of all those (excluding weather and surrounding landscape), Lee's Summit has been by far our favorite place in terms of convenience, affordability, safety, etc...

It's an amazing place to raise a family (better than some of the KS suburbs imo, due to traffic issues).


That said, I'll be looking back and TN when it comes to finding a place to settle in 2.5 years, cause one thing Lee's Summit doesn't have is the mountains and weather of East TN.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,493,517 times
Reputation: 5409
I used to try to defend Raytown, but I'm not hearing good things about it lately from those I know that live there. I don't get it. The location is perfect and it used to be a really nice middle class suburb but I guess it's just too close to east kcmo.
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:02 PM
 
99 posts, read 193,737 times
Reputation: 32
Ya not what it once was many say. When we play them here we have to bring in extra security do to problems in the recent past. I'm not sure which is worse other there, the kids or the parents, you could flip a coin.
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Old 04-08-2012, 05:52 PM
 
22 posts, read 87,158 times
Reputation: 24
MissPiggy,
I've lived in Raytown a little under 2 years and find it an "okay" place. I moved from rural Colorado, so I was wary of crime, but it's not so bad. There are pockets of the city where I wouldn't want to live, but really, just be aware of your surroundings when you're looking for a home. We have 2/3 acre with lots of trees and a (now) 12-yr-old housihng area that's set between homes that are $100K less and $100-200K more.
As for schools, I don't have kids, but at least Raytown schools are accredited, unlike KCMO schools right now.
As for community, I think you have areas anywhere that are better than others. Not many kids on the cul de sac where I live. But other areas close-by are full of kids playing in the yards.
When I shop, I tend to go to Lee's Summit or Overland Park, KS. Not much to offer in Raytown, although if a library is important, the whole area has a great library district!
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