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Old 02-06-2012, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
Reputation: 48613

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hueffenhardt View Post
Why does it cost $500,000 to plant 3,000 trees? That is $166.67 per sapling. You can buy 100 Burr Oak saplings that are 18 - 24" tall for $2.25 each. Now I know you have to transport the saplings to wherever you are going to plant them and you will need to carry some shovels, water, and maybe some mulch (and you'll have to pay the salaries of those who plant them), but that should not come to $167 per sapling, especially when if they plant several at the same time. I bet some Boy or Girl Scouts would love to help plant trees.
If they prefer not to start from saplings, but look to transplant larger trees, it would cost quite a bit more.
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Old 02-06-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,101 posts, read 1,304,562 times
Reputation: 1358
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Is anybody on here old enough to remember the major loss of trees KCMO incurred back in the 1950’s I think? My parents and grandparents always talk(ed) about it. They grew up on the east side (Swope Parkway, Cleveland Ave etc). This was back when those areas were nice middle class areas.

Apparently disease killed tens of thousands of trees in like one year and much of the city was never the same since. I will have to get some more details on that because a lot of my family seems to have vivid memories of it so it must have been pretty bad.
The US experienced two significant tree-related "extinction events." I use quotes because a small set of individual trees in each species did survive, and some of those are the basis for cross-breeding with other species in order to promote hardiness and disease resistance.

The first event was the demise of the American Chestnut. The habitat of this tree did not extend as far west as Kansas City -- its habitat extended from the Mississippi to points east. The chestnut was extremely common, large, and highly useful during the 19th century (furniture, railroad ties, telegraph poles). The disease, a fungal blight, ran its course from about 1905, starting in the New York area, and by 1940 had extended to the full range of the chestnut. The last trees to die were in Dixie.

The second event was the demise of the American Elm. Condition was Dutch Elm Disease -- caused by a European bark beetle. The Elm's range included Kansas City, and it had been heavily planted in the US especially after the Civil War as an urban tree. Dutch Elm Disease ran its course from about 1925, starting near Cleveland, until about 1975. Kansas City was one of the last affected cities. Our elms died mostly in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Some elms still survive, but require yearly injections of "medicine" to innoculate the tree. The elm in the front yard of our house near 63d and State Line was preserved in this fashion, although it is a lonely example (only one I know of in the neighborhood). Elms used to be planted in an "allee" style, creating a canopy over the street.

Central Park has an allee of elms that are treated yearly -- a good example of how many city streets used to look.

Kansas City sprayed DDT from trucks throughout the 1960s in an attempt to save the trees. DDT was however banned around this same time, and within a few years, the American Elm was lost.

A grove of American Elms with natural resistance was found in the 1980s near Princeton NJ, and foresters have cross-bred samples of this tree with the Chinese Elm and other trees. Apparently something similar is being done with cross-bred American Chestnuts.
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Old 02-06-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, Kansas
82 posts, read 149,552 times
Reputation: 36
The average life span of a planted "street tree" is only five to seven years. Compacted soil, salt, drought, and vandalism do away with most young trees. American elms are tolerant of clayey, poorly drained soils, so that, plus the beautiful vase-shaped branching that doesn't interfere with passing traffic, made them popular for street plantings all over the Midwest. I see quite a few large, healthy elms around Kansas City still. They have evaded the Dutch elm disease for now.

If anyone's interested in seeing what an American chestnut tree looks like, there are a couple of grand specimens on the Arbor Day Foundation grounds in Nebraska City, Nebr.

The Japanese beetle has established itself around KC, so this is a new threat faced by some of our native and introduced trees. They particularly enjoy feeding on American elm, American linden, black walnut, Japanese maple, all kinds of cherry trees, as well as my roses.

It's really too bad KCMO hasn't put the money into maintaining its urban forest. I have noticed the decline in the years since I came to live here.
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,493,517 times
Reputation: 5409
Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
The US experienced two significant tree-related "extinction events." I use quotes because a small set of individual trees in each species did survive, and some of those are the basis for cross-breeding with other species in order to promote hardiness and disease resistance.

The first event was the demise of the American Chestnut. The habitat of this tree did not extend as far west as Kansas City -- its habitat extended from the Mississippi to points east. The chestnut was extremely common, large, and highly useful during the 19th century (furniture, railroad ties, telegraph poles). The disease, a fungal blight, ran its course from about 1905, starting in the New York area, and by 1940 had extended to the full range of the chestnut. The last trees to die were in Dixie.

The second event was the demise of the American Elm. Condition was Dutch Elm Disease -- caused by a European bark beetle. The Elm's range included Kansas City, and it had been heavily planted in the US especially after the Civil War as an urban tree. Dutch Elm Disease ran its course from about 1925, starting near Cleveland, until about 1975. Kansas City was one of the last affected cities. Our elms died mostly in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Some elms still survive, but require yearly injections of "medicine" to innoculate the tree. The elm in the front yard of our house near 63d and State Line was preserved in this fashion, although it is a lonely example (only one I know of in the neighborhood). Elms used to be planted in an "allee" style, creating a canopy over the street.

Central Park has an allee of elms that are treated yearly -- a good example of how many city streets used to look.

Kansas City sprayed DDT from trucks throughout the 1960s in an attempt to save the trees. DDT was however banned around this same time, and within a few years, the American Elm was lost.

A grove of American Elms with natural resistance was found in the 1980s near Princeton NJ, and foresters have cross-bred samples of this tree with the Chinese Elm and other trees. Apparently something similar is being done with cross-bred American Chestnuts.
Interesting. Thanks for the info.
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Old 02-07-2012, 09:02 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,848,534 times
Reputation: 12719
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeb View Post
The average life span of a planted "street tree" is only five to seven years. Compacted soil, salt, drought, and vandalism do away with most young trees. American elms are tolerant of clayey, poorly drained soils, so that, plus the beautiful vase-shaped branching that doesn't interfere with passing traffic, made them popular for street plantings all over the Midwest. I see quite a few large, healthy elms around Kansas City still. They have evaded the Dutch elm disease for now.

If anyone's interested in seeing what an American chestnut tree looks like, there are a couple of grand specimens on the Arbor Day Foundation grounds in Nebraska City, Nebr.

The Japanese beetle has established itself around KC, so this is a new threat faced by some of our native and introduced trees. They particularly enjoy feeding on American elm, American linden, black walnut, Japanese maple, all kinds of cherry trees, as well as my roses.

It's really too bad KCMO hasn't put the money into maintaining its urban forest. I have noticed the decline in the years since I came to live here.
There is another beetle tree threat on the way too, the camphor shot borer (ambrosia beetle): http://ipm.missouri.edu/MEG/2012/1/C...t-on-the-Move/
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