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Old 03-03-2012, 04:09 PM
 
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locals please advise what blue hills is like to live and buy a home......is it safe?..
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Old 03-03-2012, 04:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Taimenbum View Post
locals please advise what blue hills is like to live and buy a home......is it safe?..
There are two Blue Hills in KCMO. One is a subdivision around 127th & State Line (1960's era constuction) and the other is an older neighborhood about 53rd & Paseo.

About which one were you inquiring?
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Old 03-03-2012, 04:29 PM
 
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The second one you mentioned, ie paseo & 53rd........thank you in advance
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Old 03-03-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Here's one crime stats map published for Blue Hills (not Blue Hills Estates)...not sure how thorough it is, so take it for what it is, which is just a publicly searchable online resource.

Blue Hills, Kansas City, MO Neighborhood Crime Map, Statistics, Alerts and Reports
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Old 03-04-2012, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Originally Posted by Taimenbum View Post
The second one you mentioned, ie paseo & 53rd........thank you in advance
Most people would consider that area the ghetto, as most areas east of Troost are considered. And this area is not only east of Troost, but east of Paseo. It's pretty solidy poor and probably 90+% black. I would imagine the crime is high, but not the worst in Kansas City. The area is surprisingly intact, however, with some cute but mostly small homes. Lots of bungalows. Even though in the 'hood, it is close to some of KC's best neighborhoods and institutions, like Rockhurst University, UMKC, the Plaza, Brookside, and the Zoo. Paseo is a nice boulevard with a rich history, yet now is underutilized and underappreciated. It's the western boundaro of Blue Hills. Prospect, the street most associated with the worst of the ghetto, is the eastern boundary - although, prospect is worse further north. Volker/Swope parkway is the northern boundary and a busy commuter corridor for suburbanites driving into the Plaza and urban core from Raytown and Lee's Summit for work. 63rd Street is the southern boundary and also a fairly busy commuter corridor. 63rd Street isn't bad at all by ghetto standards. It's got several office buildings, a couple hospitals, a couple shopping centers and grocery stores, CVS/Walgreen's, and a bunch of other retail and restaurants. All in all, it's a rough area but one that I would like to see improve and not be given up on. I know 2 people who live there, one is Salvadorian and the other white, neither have had any problems. I'll also add that there is a newer suburban subdivision built on a former golf course at the southern end of the neighborhoods, closer to 63rd St, which is easy to discern on a map. I don't know who lives there or why they would spend so much to live in that area, but they do. Probably teachers, city employees, school district employees, and perhaps a couple of local politicans. Those houses are well into the $100,000's, while most of the original houses in Blue Hills are probably $50K average, if that. I do believe the golf course that used to be there was Blue Hills and it moved to the area the other neighborhood called Blue Hills is located, which is the connection with the name.
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Old 03-13-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
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This was one of the solid, middle-class neighborhoods of Kansas City. It fed into the once excellent Paseo High School (demolished in the 1980s in a fit of pique resulting from the court-mandated restructuring of all of the Missouri-side schools).

The demise of the KC school district is probably the root cause of what befell Blue Hills (and much of the rest of the old "urban core." A traditionally segregated school district, KC voluntarily integrated after Brown v Topeka. There was an influx of minorities into the district, which was to some degree then resegregated along residential lines. White flight followed in waves depending on the decisions of the school board (which IMHO "directed" where the minority students were placed year upon year). Two teacher strikes in the 1970s cemented the impression of an out-of-control school system. Ultimately, the entire district depopulated of middle-class whites who had once used the public schools (a strongly Catholic and wealthy Protestant community from the Plaza south to Waldo did not leave).

Many of the middle-class minority families have now also left the old KCMSD confines, leaving vast areas of solid housing stock and well-planned 1920s neighborhoods relatively vacant. All in less than two generations, I should note.
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Old 03-13-2012, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Tower Grove East, St. Louis, MO
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^Interesting information. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
This was one of the solid, middle-class neighborhoods of Kansas City. It fed into the once excellent Paseo High School (demolished in the 1980s in a fit of pique resulting from the court-mandated restructuring of all of the Missouri-side schools).

The demise of the KC school district is probably the root cause of what befell Blue Hills (and much of the rest of the old "urban core." A traditionally segregated school district, KC voluntarily integrated after Brown v Topeka. There was an influx of minorities into the district, which was to some degree then resegregated along residential lines. White flight followed in waves depending on the decisions of the school board (which IMHO "directed" where the minority students were placed year upon year). Two teacher strikes in the 1970s cemented the impression of an out-of-control school system. Ultimately, the entire district depopulated of middle-class whites who had once used the public schools (a strongly Catholic and wealthy Protestant community from the Plaza south to Waldo did not leave).

Many of the middle-class minority families have now also left the old KCMSD confines, leaving vast areas of solid housing stock and well-planned 1920s neighborhoods relatively vacant. All in less than two generations, I should note.
Love your knowledge of the KC area (your post about the Mission Mall brings back memories). What part of KC did you grow up? I was just talking to my dad about the east midtown area of KC, he grew up on Swope Parkway in a big catholic family. His parents stayed as long as they could in that giant home. So many memories there. I think they were the last original white family in like a ten block area to leave actually (late 90's). I think it's now apartments and pretty ghetto looking last time I drove by.

My other grandparents (who also had a big family) lived south of the plaza passed, but they lived in their huge home on 53rd all the way through and now it's owned by other relatives that have probably put 500k into the home. They now rent out the top floor to UMKC students.

It's incredible how different these two areas are today, yet how similar they were in the 40's and 50's.

Last edited by kcmo; 03-13-2012 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
This was one of the solid, middle-class neighborhoods of Kansas City. It fed into the once excellent Paseo High School (demolished in the 1980s in a fit of pique resulting from the court-mandated restructuring of all of the Missouri-side schools).

The demise of the KC school district is probably the root cause of what befell Blue Hills (and much of the rest of the old "urban core." A traditionally segregated school district, KC voluntarily integrated after Brown v Topeka. There was an influx of minorities into the district, which was to some degree then resegregated along residential lines. White flight followed in waves depending on the decisions of the school board (which IMHO "directed" where the minority students were placed year upon year). Two teacher strikes in the 1970s cemented the impression of an out-of-control school system. Ultimately, the entire district depopulated of middle-class whites who had once used the public schools (a strongly Catholic and wealthy Protestant community from the Plaza south to Waldo did not leave).

Many of the middle-class minority families have now also left the old KCMSD confines, leaving vast areas of solid housing stock and well-planned 1920s neighborhoods relatively vacant. All in less than two generations, I should note.
Very nice writing and perspective and I don't dispute anything you're saying at all, but the fact the "middle class" has changed a bit and standards have changed shouldn't be discounted. The majority of the houses in Blue Hills are smaller than today's standards, which larger houses is part of the reason the Plaza through Waldo has held on. Other factors are energy efficiency in modern houses, lead paint and asbestos issues in the old + high cost/effort to restore said issues, the (then) availability of new cheap construction, and the mere allure of new and shiny as well as perceived prestige and trendyness of suburban developments. Yet when I think about the potential of these neighborhoods coming back, that school district issue certainly comes to mind as the #1 deterrant. Today, the cream of the crop students continue to be segregated into the top districts and even inner suburban districts are bleeding and becoming increasingly a segregation of have-not's. Socio-economic segregation, especially among those with school-aged children, seems to be a real problem.
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
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Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
Very nice writing and perspective and I don't dispute anything you're saying at all, but the fact the "middle class" has changed a bit and standards have changed shouldn't be discounted. The majority of the houses in Blue Hills are smaller than today's standards, which larger houses is part of the reason the Plaza through Waldo has held on. Other factors are energy efficiency in modern houses, lead paint and asbestos issues in the old + high cost/effort to restore said issues, the (then) availability of new cheap construction, and the mere allure of new and shiny as well as perceived prestige and trendyness of suburban developments. Yet when I think about the potential of these neighborhoods coming back, that school district issue certainly comes to mind as the #1 deterrant. Today, the cream of the crop students continue to be segregated into the top districts and even inner suburban districts are bleeding and becoming increasingly a segregation of have-not's. Socio-economic segregation, especially among those with school-aged children, seems to be a real problem.
That is true, that housing expectations and family structures have changed. But I'd note, the suburban districts to which many of the former residents of Kansas City neighborhoods like Blue Hills moved, were similar in residential style: the ranch homes of Prairie Village and northern Overland Park, the bungalows of Raytown.

I believe the primary cause of the middle class departure from the East Side of Kansas City was the KCM school district. The neighborhoods in Center school district (also in Kansas City proper) held together much longer.
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