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View Poll Results: What city is most similar to KC
Cinncinati 18 25.71%
Columbus 6 8.57%
Des Moines 3 4.29%
Indianapolis 8 11.43%
Milwaukee 4 5.71%
Omaha 7 10.00%
Oklahoma City 2 2.86%
Other City (not listed) 7 10.00%
St. Louis 9 12.86%
Tulsa 4 5.71%
Wichita 2 2.86%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-08-2012, 09:48 AM
 
759 posts, read 495,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
food in KC is better than the food in St. Louis.
I think they're pretty much on par. St Louis and KC are both surprisingly good food towns, both downscale and up. KC is starting to get a pretty solid reputation as a food town. So is Cleveland, deservedly. I haven't eaten enough in most of the others to really feel comfortable judging their food scenes, with the exception of Cincinnati, which I think is shabby, food-wise.

The worst food I have consistently had in the midwest is Chicago, though by any legitimate measure it is the best food town in the midwest, so experience isn't everything. I can totally imagine vacationing in KC or StL or Cleveland without knowing the ins-and-outs of those towns and coming away with the impression that they are horrible, horrible places to dine.
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:49 AM
 
1,768 posts, read 1,718,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseOwlSaysHoot View Post
Yep. STL wins easily in the Americanized Italian category. I think KC takes it in most other categories, particularly James Beard and other more progressive dining options.
I'm thinking KC has 4 James Beard winners still active in KC plus Lidia Bostianich restaurant she opened in KC. STL had a few qualify for James Beard recently but I don't think they've ever had a winner. One in KC (Bluestem) and one in STL (Niche) made final round for Midwest this year, don't think winner has been announced. Frankly, it's now more of a who you know membership club these day than based purely objectively like it used to be but it's still considered the Oscars of the foodie industry. KC is ahead in that sense.
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Old 08-08-2012, 12:12 PM
 
3,544 posts, read 4,817,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Yeah, they are hideous and ubiquitous. I am through littering this thread with architectural abominations. My point is that what is getting identified here as "sunbelty" is actually just what mid-grade new-construction suburbs and exurbs look like in all over the midwest and, indeed, America. Sadly.
but you don't see as much stucco in the Midwest or even in the South (except Florida and Texas) You see more brick and vinyl. I live in TN and I hardly ever see houses like the ones in those pictures. And in St. Louis, most of the suburban houses are brick, vinyl, or a mixture. Newer houses in St Charles County are mostly vinyl with some brick whereas West County is mostly brick with some vinyl. Johnson County seems to have more stucco than the average non-Sun Belt suburb

Last edited by Smtchll; 08-08-2012 at 12:24 PM..
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Old 08-08-2012, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Old Hyde Park, Kansas City,MO
1,145 posts, read 1,143,251 times
Reputation: 541
Why isn't Minneapolis one of the choices listed? Minneapolis has somewhat similar housing and the Twin Cities don't really fall in an east coast kind of looking city like Milwaukee or St Louis. Minneapolis and KC both have fairly robust and diverse economies as well and both are powerhouses for a much larger region. Both were incorporated around the same time, both located along a major river.
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Old 08-08-2012, 05:35 PM
Status: "That 80s Sound, ZTT Records!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,320 posts, read 21,167,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewcrew1000 View Post
Why isn't Minneapolis one of the choices listed? Minneapolis has somewhat similar housing and the Twin Cities don't really fall in an east coast kind of looking city like Milwaukee or St Louis. Minneapolis and KC both have fairly robust and diverse economies as well and both are powerhouses for a much larger region. Both were incorporated around the same time, both located along a major river.
Minneapolis could be a selection on the poll, but it doesn't really match up to KC as well in terms of over median household income, educational attainment, and better distributed job growth. Minneapolis also has an extensive trail and parks network that is interconnected across a large area, something that KC really needs to work on. I would argue MPLS serves as the big metro for a much larger rural area compared to KC as its pull factor stretches from the Dakotas all the way to Wisconsin.
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Old Hyde Park, Kansas City,MO
1,145 posts, read 1,143,251 times
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Other people who agree KC is most like the Twin Cities. The pictures almost look like KC
KCRag Forum - View topic - IOWA CITY, MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL, WALKER MN, AND BEYOND
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:08 PM
 
759 posts, read 495,984 times
Reputation: 714
I do think there is a difference, though, between what cities look like and what they ARE like, culturally. Detroit, urban KC, Omaha, Minneapolis, Indianapolis all developed and kind of hit their urban stride around the same era, and the building stock reflects that era. There are quite a few wood-frame and bungalow ridden West coast cities whose built environment and architectural vernacular look a lot like some of those cities, but I don't think that means Kansas City is very much like Portland or Indianapolis is much like Oakland. Buffalo and KC look a lot alike too, but they are basically lite-rust belt bookends with not a whole lot in common. Cleveland is kind of the bridge city architecturally between the StL/Pittsburgh/Cincy era cities and the Detroit/KC/Minneapolis era towns. But ultimately I think there is just a lot more at question than the bones of a town.
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