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Old 10-04-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,202,026 times
Reputation: 2549

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
Yes, this! It just seemed to me that people looking to move into that general area were looking at Olathe, people from outside the state which really have no fall back plan should the jobs disappear. My thoughts also were toward Garmin and what happens if it disappears. Technology is moving so fast now and people are scaling back on a lot of gadgets because the extra money isn't there. We are in Emporia right now and my husband has been out on job interviews, "blue collar" and they do have openings. We have come here from SE KS and are on wheels so can shop around. Issue here is Hostess and it being in bankruptcy with a lot of people holding their breathe on that since they are a MAJOR employer here and I read they just got some ruling about being able to stop the union from striking over wage and benefit cuts and the court isn't going to allow the employees to strike so maybe that will help the company. So, I have a blue collar view of the world so I'm sort of a misfit here and even when I was white-collar, I was still blue collar underneath at the heart of things. I do like to know what is going on everywhere though to see if I can guess the ultimate outcome.
"Blue-collar view of the world" says all I was trying to say in one simple statement. A lot of people online and forums like this, as well as in the media, seem really out of touch with that segment of society - even though many have roots in it or family or are just a flat out part of it and don't speak up, and I do believe the working segment is significantly larger than the true white-collar professional segment. You're not a misfit, people and the media just make it seem that way. The people you associate with and hear are talking about Olathe and it being a place to be is because it's a major jobs center for the truly average person and family. America needs a dose of humility and to celebrate the average American, rather than try to look down and ignore. Even politicians, at least on the national level, don't give proper attention to the working segment. This group needs a better voice. More recognition. Solidarity. Their voice should be equivalent to their size of the population, and it's currently not. People who are successful white-collar professionals need to realize they are not merely average, but above average, and realize the amount of success they've truly had, and realize the conditions are not there in everybody's upbringing and ability to do the same, not to mention the lack of enough of those jobs for everybody to be so, as well as the fact that more mundane tasks in society have to be tended to. I'm not naming names, but one major political party, at least on the national level, seems to think our society is going to be the first post-industrial society, full of managers, in their version of some sort of utopian fantasy, and it just ain't gonna happen.
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Old 10-04-2012, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,202,026 times
Reputation: 2549
Quote:
Originally Posted by kc chris View Post
I could definitely see someone saying JoCo in general is the place to be in Kansas for jobs (or anything really), but Olathe specifically? Pass. There's a giant stream of cars on I-35 every morning heading downtown to the IRS building, the Fed building, H&R Block, DST, Cerner, etc. It's just a suburb, not a job mecca.

A lot of the MO jobs lost have simply moved to the Kansas side when the company moved to new facilities across the state line, so the numbers are misleading. They can claim a job was created in Kansas, and one lost in Missouri, but the reality is no job was ever created or position opened for a new employment opportunity, someone now just works on the other side of the state line.
The Kansas City area had a net increase of jobs, but only because of the Kansas side. The net increase in metro jobs doesn't include shifted jobs from one side of the state line to the other because they were already here. That means a net increase of jobs to the metro has actually occured on the Kansas side. Again, I won't say the Missouri side hasn't produced new jobs too, but not enough to supplant jobs that have gone away (just gone away or left this metro, but not shifted states within the metro). At any rate, the Kansas side suburbs have 44% of the area's jobs. That is a jobs mecca, in my opinion. Olathe is in the center of a ton of jobs in general, of all types, and nearby to a ton of corporate/white-collar jobs in OP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kc chris View Post
Like I said, KC is a lot more diversified, Garmin might be a major employer in Olathe but they are far from the only major employer in the area, and checking their website they only have 3,000 people in Olathe. By comparison Olathe has a population of 127k and virtually meshes with Overland Park with a population of 126k. This one company isn't supporting this town or this area.

More so, Garmin is a stand alone company, if it disappears tomorrow it really only effects Garmin employees. Compare that to Wichita and Boeing where you either worked directly for Boeing, or for a contractor/supplier/whatever else for Boeing...
3000 jobs is a large employer, even in a city of over 100,000, county of over a half a million, and metro of 2 million. Those jobs and that major employer are not to be discounted. BTW, OP's population isn't 126K, it's closer to 200K. I'd like to see the numbers, but it may just be that more people commute into Kansas from Missouri. And if Garmin disappears, along with it's top-of-the-food-chain jobs, that can have an effect on the economy, as a major employer like that provides a ton of spin-off economic activity. There is a synergy there. There are companies that provide services to Garmin, there are hotels, grocery stores, general retail, etc. etc. For a major employer like Garmin, or the GM or Ford plants, Cerner, etc., each job they provide has a spin off of x-number of jobs. That's how it works. So, again, Garmin is a major employer not to be discounted and losing them would be a blow not only to their immediate surroundings, but the metro as a whole and the state.
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:19 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,202,026 times
Reputation: 2549
Metro area’s hiring up, jobless rate down to 7 percent

Most added positions are on the Kansas side. Employment still lags pre-recession levels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIANE STAFFORD
The Kansas City Star - Posted on Wed, Oct. 03, 2012 11:31 PM

The Kansas City metropolitan area is on something of a job-gaining roll, especially in Kansas.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Wednesday that the area’s unemployment rate was 7 percent in August, compared with 8.4 percent a year earlier. The report also noted that the Kansas side of the metro area had accounted for more than two-thirds of the area’s employment gains from August 2011 to August 2012.

Overall, the Kansas City metro area had 13,300 more employees on nonfarm payrolls in August 2012 than August 2011. About 9,100 of the net gain came on the Kansas side, which represents 44 percent of the area’s workforce....
Metro area’s hiring up, jobless rate down to 7 percent - KansasCity.com
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,189 posts, read 14,079,037 times
Reputation: 18141
Although, a lot of these businesses routinely relocate when their benefits for relocating to an area expire and another city opens its purse. Have seen it across the country. Here today. Gone tomorrow. A lot of buildings set empty. I also watch the foreclosures in several states and cities routinely and they paint a more honest picture than the news.
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