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Old 09-29-2012, 07:01 PM
 
Location: IN
20,188 posts, read 34,537,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I like conservative and that has contributed to my remaining in Kansas and to the times we have left and returned. Thanks for all the input as it has been interesting.
The political branding of conservative in Kansas is far out of the mainstream compared to other Republican areas I am familiar with in the US. Brownback is a clear indication of this disturbing political trend in Kansas.
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Old 09-29-2012, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,478,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I have lived in central and southeast KS for many years and when I see the posts made by people living in the greater KC area (Olathe, Lawrence, - the whole congested area), it really does not seem to reflect traditional Kansas. It is like it is a whole different state to me.
Perhaps because half of greater KC is actually in Missouri??
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,209,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The political branding of conservative in Kansas is far out of the mainstream compared to other Republican areas I am familiar with in the US. Brownback is a clear indication of this disturbing political trend in Kansas.
Why is it disturbing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by grmasterb View Post
Perhaps because half of greater KC is actually in Missouri??
I thought she made it clear she was referring to the Kansas side of KC. But since you mention it, KCMO has a lot of influence from Kansas.
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Can't this be said about any metro area of any state? I think there is a disconnect from a major metro area and the rural parts of most states.

Having said that the Kansas side of KC (including Lawrence) accounts around 1 million people and nearly half of the population of the entire state and is nearly twice as populated as the largest metro in KS (Wichita), so economically, even though the KC area is based in Missouri, it's also the most important metro in KS.

So the KC area is vital to KS whether people like it or not.
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,707 posts, read 18,531,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
I thought she made it clear she was referring to the Kansas side of KC. But since you mention it, KCMO has a lot of influence from Kansas.
Other than KU alumni living there how so?

I think KCMO and really the entire metro area on both sides of the state line are pretty independent from both states. Again, this is not uncommon for a large city, but especially true for KC I think.
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
I thought she made it clear she was referring to the Kansas side of KC. But since you mention it, KCMO has a lot of influence from Kansas.
How so? The presence of KU fans?

Seriously, I found it a bit vague, and I couldn't pass up the opportunity to be a smart-Alec.

My observation is that multi-state metros can take on personalities that defy all states in which they're located. Cincinnati is an example. The rest of Kentucky sees its side of Cincy metro as a bunch of Yankees, and the rest of Ohio equates Cincy as basically being part of Kentucky.
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:25 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
7,677 posts, read 5,655,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
Why is it disturbing?
Yes I, too, want to know what is disturbing about the conservative values that built this once great nation.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,178,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minneha View Post
It's still in-state, which means that even "kids" who grow up in Goodland and St. Francis, if they go to an in-state four-year college (not all do, but many do), they will be moving to someplace that is closer to KC than to Denver.
Yeah. Hayes is closer to KC than Denver, but it's still not really "going to KC." lol
And that's before we even consider the kids that go to Kearney (Nebraska) or a school in Colorado.

Seriously, most people out here feel little to no connection whatsoever to KC.
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Old 09-30-2012, 01:52 PM
 
Location: IN
20,188 posts, read 34,537,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
Why is it disturbing?



.
"On November 16th, protestors in Wichita, Kansas registered and attended Governor Brownsback’s Town Hall Meeting focusing on child poverty in the state. The group planned to protest the Governor’s decisions on how to improve the poverty level of children in Kansas. To date, Governor Brownback has cut funds for several educational and healthcare programs for children and adolescents while 75,000 children in Kansas are without health insurance.

All citizens in attendance were made to sit at assigned tables while listening to speeches sponsored by the Heritage Foundation, a think tank funded by the Koch Brothers. The meeting that took place failed to discuss Brownback’s several poor decisions and instead was a subtle promotion for marriage in Kansas – something that the speaker related to the poverty level.

At the end of the speech, protestors stood with their backs to the speaker and read their own statement to educate those in attendance on the cuts that Brownback has orchestrated. At the end of this statement, as the protestors attempted to walk out quietly, police officers entered the building and arrested Doris Gent (Ravenfeather), a 61-year-old Native American woman.

Doris was arrested brutally, with onlookers describing the police twisting her arm behind her violently and pushing her against the wall. The police were so forceful she was left with several bruises and a strained neck, prompting a visit Wesley Hospital’s Emergency Room the next day. Meanwhile, Doris had a husband at home caring for their disabled child."


News opinion from rural Kansas, Scott county
*Conservative Source*

"But Kansas has become a battleground state in a different sense. The battle, interestingly enough, is within the Republican Party itself.

It’s between conservatives - or “ultra right wingers, as described by Senate Vice President John Vratil, himself a Republican - and moderates.

Moderate Republicans are in a fight for survival.

Not to be overdramatic, but survival of the state - as we know it - could also be hanging in the balance.

The ultra conservatives, led by Gov. Sam Brownback, have made voting more restrictive with the new voter ID law, they’ve turned away federal money and opposed the Affordable Care Act at every opportunity, handed management of Medicaid over to three private companies and their coup de grāce was passage of massive tax cuts during the last legislative session. These are patterned after a similar plan proposed by Congressman Paul Ryan at the national level.

Gov. Brownback proudly referred to the end result as a “real live experiment.”

What could possibly go wrong?

Experiments carry with them a certain level of uncertainty, which is fine when all you have to worry about is a beaker in a high school chemistry lab. When that lab has been expanded to the entire state, the consequences can be a little more troubling.

Brownback and his conservative colleagues have brought the failed theory of trickle-down economics to Kansas with the promise that, even though it has never been successful in the 30 years since being introduced by President Reagan, it will eventually work. All we have to do is keep trying, and trying and trying. And just because it hasn’t worked at the national level there’s no reason it can’t work in Kansas.

Trust us.

It’s economic hogwash, say moderate Republicans. The lost tax revenue will devastate schools, infrastructure and the social safety net that protects our elderly and our poor.

The Kansas Legislative Research Department which, by the way, is non-partisan, paints a pretty dire picture. It projects that, beginning in July 2017, the state’s revenue loss will exceed $900 million and the state will have dug itself into a $2.5 billion budget hole.


Moody’s Investor’s Service says tax revenue losses will be “dramatic” and that “inaction or the use of unsustainable budgetary measures to offset the loss could lead to a (rating) downgrade.”


*Liberal Source*

Recent News on Brownback

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1916196.html

*Conservative Source*

Recent Kansas Political News

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...528694408.html

Last edited by GraniteStater; 09-30-2012 at 02:12 PM..
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Location: IN
20,188 posts, read 34,537,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Yes I, too, want to know what is disturbing about the conservative values that built this once great nation.
Of course the founders were more conservative, but I'm not debating 18th century history here.

You know as well as I do that the current version of the Republican party is nothing like the one of 50 years ago. The Republican party of old still exists in modern form in states like New Hampshire, guided by solid intellect, local control over spending, and common sense. Do more research on the grand ideas Brownback has as he wants Kansas to be an experiment for his policies funded by the Koch brothers and lobbyists.
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