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Old 12-29-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22

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Missouri Lowered The Standards
Some critics suggested that NCLB created incentives for schools, districts, and states to manipulate test results. For example, schools have been shown to employ "creative reclassification" of drop-outs (to reduce unfavorable statistics). NCLB also may have caused some states to lower their official standards. Because each state could produce its own standardized tests, a state could make its statewide tests easier to pass, thereby increasing test scores. Missouri for example, improved testing scores but openly admitted that they had lowered the standards. Critics also said that punitive measures against "failing schools" created incentives to set expectations lower rather than higher. Critics even said the legislation tended to increase segregation by race and class, to be followed-up by pushing low-performing students out of school altogether.

Other critics argued that NCLB caused teachers to "teach to the test", focusing all their efforts on things that they knew would be included in the tests to the exclusion of everything else. For example, the special focus of NCLB on reading and math might mean that other areas of learning, including music, art, or physical education, would take a lower priority or be eliminated altogether. But in 2006, a study by NAMM/MENC found that NCLB apparently had little impact on music education. According to the study, of those surveyed, 76% said NCLB had no effect on music education, while only 20% said that NCLB was having an impact on music eductation. But, critically, there was almost an even split between those who said NCLB was having a positive impact versus those who said it was having a negative impact. In fact, the balance swung just barely in favor of positive (51 percent to 49 percent).

While there may be some truth in these various criticisms of NCLB, none of them reflects poorly on President Bush. In his attempt to reform education, George W. Bush made a good-faith effort to establish a plan whereby schools would be held accountable for their performance, or lack thereof. His goal was to eliminate the "achievement gap" between wealthier suburban white students, and the less-fortunate urban African-American and/or Latino students. It was not his intention to see states lower their educational standards, or to have schools come up with "creative reclassifications". His intent was to motivate schools and teachers to get down to basics, and to perform their function of teaching. His intent was to "get results" and to "eliminate complacency".

On the other hand, educators and/or state employees may have succumbed to the temptation to lower standards, manipulate test scores, or willfully circumvent the law in order to achieve some advantage at the expense of their students' education. If such is indeed the case, then any and all of the blame lies with these so-called "educators" and/or state employees who thus chose to lie, cheat and steal. Laws such as NCLB may create "negative incentives", but no one is forced to break the law. When laws such as NCLB are written and enacted, it is assumed that honest citizens will make a good-faith effort to comply with the law, not to circumvent it for face-saving or financial reasons; and particularly not at the expense our children's education.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
The REAL Facts and Figures
Sherri Tucker for School Board

Spending

Our tax levy is one of the highest in the metro area, yet we spend among the least on our students. Our children can learn in any building.

During the last election one of the present school board members said that he would hold up our facilities to any of those in Johnson County. I didn’t move to Lee’s Summit to compete with Johnson County. I moved here because the schools were supposed to be among the best that the metro had to offer.

Here is an article from the Lee’s Summit R-VII newsletter:

The Kansas City Business Journal recently featured a listing of the top 25 school districts based on enrollments. The information including budget and employee statistics appeared in an October 2008 issue of the publication.

Lee’s Summit R-7 ranked seventh in the metropolitan area in terms of total enrollment among the 25 districts selected for the newspaper edition. The R-7 School District’s total enrollment for this school year is 17,137.

The six districts in the metro area with higher enrollments are Shawnee Mission, Kan,; Olathe, Kan.; Kansas City, MO, Blue Valley, Kan.; Kansas City Kan.; and North Kansas City.

The Business Journal also featured a chart listing the top 19 school districts in terms of cost per pupil. On this list, the Lee's Summit R-7 School District was the lowest, spending the least per student of the 19 districts included in the newspaper's ranking.


While we have received the Distinction of Performance Award for eight years we have also shown regression for certain subgroups.

Lee’s Summit has been blessed with a high population of children that are high achievers. Studies show that children in affluent school districts do better than those in high poverty districts. We live in an affluent suburb with the highest tax levy in the metro area. We have parents that are professionals and children that have access to many amenities that allow them to reach their potential. We have some of the highest paid teachers in the state of Missouri.

Is it because they go to school in Lee’s Summit or does Lee’s Summit look good because those kids attend their schools?

If you brought kids from the Kansas City School District out here would they prosper as well? Isn’t that one of the subgroup of students that Lee’s Summit is failing? The numbers show that Lee’s Summit scores have regressed for black students, free lunch students, and special education students. There is no denying that.

Missouri is 45th in the country for education. Is it enough to be the best of the worst? I would like to think that we would strive for more than that. Missouri handed out 330 of the same awards across the whole state. Those same districts also were failing black students, free lunch students, and special education students. Can you really claim distinction in performance when the only students that are doing well are the ones that would do well no matter where they went?

I know that Money Magazine picked us as Number 7 in the country. What was their criteria? Where did they get their information?

The following is from the United States Department of Education. It is based on test scores, college readiness, etc. Real data.

Missouri ranked 45th in the country. They had a grade of "C-" with 72.4. They received a "D" for K-12 Achievement. They received an "F" for Status. They received an "F" in Spending. They received a "D-" in accountability. They received an "F" in college readiness.

Lee's Summit is ranked 27th in the State of Missouri. That is for the district. Lee's Summit High School ranked 12th in the State. Lee's Summit North ranked 24th in the State. Lee's Summit West ranked 57th in the State.

Our tax levy is 2nd highest in Jackson County. Only Hickman Mills has a higher tax levy. According to the Lee's Summit newspaper, we spend the least amount on our students. We are 4th out of 6 school districts for teacher's salaries, We are 3rd out of 6 school districts for administrator's salaries. Where is all of that money going? Brick and mortar?

Out of 6 districts only 2 spend part of the tax levy on capital projects. We are spending $.05 on ours. Our debt service is second highest. We are spending $1.07 on that.

This information is all available on the Internet. Don't just believe what you read in the district's newsletter. Investigate. All is not what it seems.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
Missouri Deletes Maximizing From Special Education Laws
This means that Missouri has lowered its standards so that they won't have to worry about litigation. Wouldn't it have been better to make sure that the standards were lived up to?

The Missouri General Assembly has removed language from its special education laws that formerly required schools in the state to maximize the capabilities of students with disabilities. The action came less than two months after the Missouri Supreme Court let stand a state appellate court decision applying the maiximizing standard to a special education dispute, instead of the lesser "free appropriate public education" from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

The General Assembly deleted from Missouri Statutes 162.670 a declaration of state policy to provide special education services to all students with disabilities sufficient to meet their needs and maximize their capabilities. The section now states that Missouri public schools must provide all students with disabilities a free appropriate education consistent with state and federal regulations implementing the IDEA.

Missouri was one of only a few states whose special education laws exceeded federal minimums. The appellate decision stated that the state law standard exceeded that of the IDEA and that the maximizing language was not idle or superfluous verbiage. Lagares v Camdenton R-II Sch. Dist., 68 S. W. 3d 518 (Mo.Ct. App., W. Dist. 2001); see Special Education Law Update, Vol. X, No. 7, p. 1.

The General Assembly also acted to delete maximizing language from statutory definitions containted in Mo. Stat 162.675, and defined the scope of court review of special education hearing appeals panel decisions described in Mo. Stat 162.962. Courts reviewing hearing panel decisions will be limited to questions about whether the decision was unsupported by competent and substantial evidence in the record, whether the hearing used unlawful procedures or was unfair, and whether the decision was arbitrary, capricious or unreasonable or an abuse of discretion. 91st Mo. Gen. Assembly, 2nd Reg. Sess, H.B. 2023
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
Teachers Stands In Place OF The Parent When The Child Is Sent To The Public Schools
http://plms.leesummit.k12.mo.us/handbook/handbook07.pdf

POLICIES CONCERNING ORDER AND DISCIPLINE

The law provides teachers with considerable authority over the control and education of the child, once the parent sends his child to the public schools. The authority of the teacher is given by law and is not delegated by the parent. Authority is granted to the teacher by the state as an essential part of teacher responsibility. The teacher stands in place of the parent when the child is under the teacherʼs supervision and care.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
Lee's Summit Has Less Students and Spends More Money
So LSR-7 has 17,000 students and an annual budget of $200 million but Blue Valley has 21,000 students and next year’s budget is $143 million. Very interesting!




http://www.kmbc.com/education/22778902/detail.html



Blue Valley Schools List $9M In Cuts

School District Facing Decreased Revenue

POSTED: 4:50 pm CST March 8, 2010

UPDATED: 5:19 pm CST March 8, 2010

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. -- The Blue Valley School District on Monday unveiled a list of cuts that total $9 million.

It's the list the board will work from when trying to trim the school budget.

Rarely has the affluent Johnson County school district had to make these kinds of cuts, KMBC's Micheal Mahoney reported.

The problem is the same as in many other school districts -- the recession has dropped property values, which is the main source of tax revenue for schools, and the state government doesn't have any money to spare.

Blue Valley has to play by the same rules as other school districts, and the problem is, we're capped," Blue Valley Superintendent Dr. Tom Trigg said.

In the past, Blue Valley could grow its way to prosperity, but school enrollment is flattening out. Currently, the district has about 21,000 students.

On Monday, the district revealed a series of cutbacks and revenue increases that would save the district $9 million.

The goal is to cut less than that -- about $6.25 million -- but administrators met Monday to draw up a bigger cut list in case they need to cut more later, Mahoney reported.

In all, the Blue Valley Schools have cut more than $11 million in the last two years.

"We're trying to keep the cuts away from the classroom, but no doubt that's going to impact the operation in a negative way," Trigg said.

The school district budget is $143 million for this year.

To see a list of the district's budget cuts, visit bluevalleyk12.org.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
Oh, What A Tangled Web We Weave When We All Are On The Same Committees
Oh, What A Tangled Web We Weave When We All Are On The Same Committees

Lee's Summit R-7 School Board Members and Those That Are Running

Ron Baker
Annette Braam
Gene Brixey
Patti Buie
Dr. David McGehee
Jon Plaas
Jeff Tindle
Jack Wiley
Mike Smith
Terri Harmon
Chris Storms

Lee's Summit Cares

Ron Baker
At Least Four Administrators From The R-7 District

Citizens Advisory Committee

Pattie Buie
Terri Harmon
Dr. David McGehee
Janice Phelan
Dr. Ann Starlin-Horner
Chris Storms
Jeff Tindle
Gene Brixey

(This information is hard to find and I could only find the minutes of a meeting and who was in attendance. Janice Phelan is in charge of this and I had to ask her for a list the last time I needed it.)

Remember folks that it is the CAC that proposed the tax levy. It's not hard to get the CAC to propose it when the school board and administrators make up the majority of the CAC. These are the same folks that decide who is on the CAC. What would be confidential and not be allowed to be heard by the public?

Confidentiality: Some agenda items may require confidentiality. This will be reviewed and stated at the conclusion of the meeting by the Chair(s). Members will know what and when to communicate. The reason for the confidentiality should be discussed by the group and if agreed by the members, the item will not be discussed outside of the meeting. All votes should become the decision of the group and not discussed outside the meeting. R-7 Community Relations Director will develop brief talking points following each meeting to be included with minutes so members will know what and when to communicate. PLEASE NOTE that CAC meetings are open meetings by law and that members of the general community and the press may be in attendance.

Building Our Future

Terri Harmon
Dr Robert "Bud" Hertzog


Lee's Summit Educational Foundation

Annette Braam
Janette Cooley
Dr. David McGehee
Dr. Michael Pragman

Sheryl Franke

Dr. Ann Starlin-Horner
Kristy Young

Building Our Future

For some reason there is no place where I can find the members of this. Doesn't surprise me very much.

Citizens For Excellence in Lee's Summit City Government

Annette Braam, Chair
Steve Braam

Dr. Steve & Patti Buie

Bill & Rita Duvall
Brian & Sheryl Franke

Jon Plaas

This list isn't even close to all of the ways that these people's lives are intertwined. I have just given a very small idea of how only certain people in Lee's Summit run the whole city and how little the average citizen has to say about what happens out here.
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Old 12-29-2012, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Hays, Kansas
705 posts, read 824,648 times
Reputation: 638
I can tell you that I've had experiences with students from 2 high schools in lees summit and another district near by. One school had really affluent children who acted just as snobby as any kid in JoCo and the other one was a lower income school and the children were much friendlier. The third school was Truman and I have no idea where that is, but they knew the Lees Summit kids so I assume it's close.
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Old 12-30-2012, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Lee's Summit, MO
58 posts, read 191,710 times
Reputation: 22
That is one of the problems with Lee's Summit. They are trying to be Johnson County East. One of our school board members stated that he would hold up our buildings to any of those in Johnson County. I didn't know that we were financing that. I thought that we were financing education.
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Old 01-03-2013, 07:02 AM
 
220 posts, read 359,741 times
Reputation: 180
You sound disenfranchised, and it's because you're putting to much faith into public education. Learning starts and ends at home, focus more of your energy on your own child and I think you'll find the results you are looking for. This all holds true for students without learning disabilities, and even more so for children with them.

Keep up your fight though, maybe you can change the current system to help those who aren't as fortunate as the rest of us that have/had parents who truly care.
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:19 AM
 
3 posts, read 5,506 times
Reputation: 17
Default Lee's Summit HS rankings question

Hello,
I am doing research on where to move in (general) KC, MO area; I am looking for a high school for my high achieving daughter, approx within 15-20 mile radius of KC Airport. She needs a STEM high school, but that seems out of the question at this point in my research.

I am curious where this info came from:
Lee's Summit High School ranked 12th in the State. Lee's Summit North ranked 24th in the State. Lee's Summit West ranked 57th in the State.

US News and World Report has different info. Just wondering.

Thank you for your time.
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