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Old 02-21-2013, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,819 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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What's funny to me (I'm a teacher) is that all the state line area school districts called a snow day the night before, before a shred of snow had even fallen.

Where I'm from (upper midwest, MUCH more regular snowfall of substance), you typically do NOT call a snow day unless it is actively snowing, and they really typically don't get called the night before based on the weight of predictions alone. But, then, those regions are more practiced at removal. Not that it was a bad thing to have school cancelled today, but it's so foreign to me, still, after five years here, to be somewhere where snow days area called preemptively.
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
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There seem to be more snow days the further south you go. I grew up (grade school) in the Chicago area in the 1960s. There was only ONE time in 8 years we had two consecutive snow days, and that was the 1967 blizzard.

When I was living in Oklahoma, they had an entire week off for one storm.
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:21 PM
 
Location: IN
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^
I would wager if KC AVERAGED 30-50 inches of snowfall each winter season that they would have far more $$ allocated toward snow removal equipment and would be much better prepared at dealing with a "decent" snowfall event...
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,067,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Yeah, there are four seasons in KC, but they ARE TOTALLY DIFFERENT than the REAL MIDWEST.

They even have different names that are more "sunbelty/southern" like: Binter, Bring, Bummer and Ball. Seriously.

THERE ARE NO SIMLIARITIES between weather in Kansas City and the regions immediately abutting it. No matter what the Koppen Climate Classifications would lead you to believe:





PLEASE BELIEVE ME!!!!!!
SDavis, normally you are quite credible, but Kansas City is the REAL Midwest, as is roughly 2/3 of the state of Missouri. And as far as Koppen Climate Classifications go, that's like the ultimate source...saying no to that is the equivalent of saying no to official documentation that a player has signed a contract with a team. KC's weather is vERY similar to the regions abutting it, depending on which ones you are talking about of course. If you are talking Kansas and Missouri, than KC is very similar to both states.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,067,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Well, you would be correct that KC weather in general is NOTHING like the vast majority of the Midwest. Much warmer climate, lower latitude, and more intense sunlight/heat. The Upper Midwest has a climate more to my liking. Yes, winters are colder, but that is because its supposed to be winter. The other three seasons are fairly mild overall. 30s and 40s are mild to me. Below 20F is colder.
Like the vast majority of the Midwest? Aren't you forgetting Kansas, Missouri, and 2/3 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. And also factoring in the hot summers, this throws in the central and southern portions of Iowa and Nebraska. KC's weather being NOTHING like the rest of the Midwest is really, really stretching the truth. Is it like the Upper Midwest? No. Like the Central Midwest? Depends on the year. Like the Lower Midwest? Yes. If you want a place that is technically in the Midwest region but has no kind of weather like the rest of the Midwest, try Branson, Missouri.
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,505,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
^
I would wager if KC AVERAGED 30-50 inches of snowfall each winter season that they would have far more $$ allocated toward snow removal equipment and would be much better prepared at dealing with a "decent" snowfall event...
Well, Denver averages something like 50" per year, yet they don't plow residential streets unless it snows over a foot in the months of Nov - Feb. And even then, all we get is one quick pass through that only allows one car at a time to get down the street. Denver is horrible with snow removal and it brings the city to a standstill.

Luckily, it rarely snows a foot or more in the winter months. If you get a foot or more in Denver, it's more likely to be in late October or late March/early April, which means it's wet slush and melts very fast. Even in winter months, the sun is stronger at this altitude, so snow does melt faster here than in KC. But still, residential streets can be quite treaturous after snows. We had 3-4" from the storm yesterday (our heaviest of the season so far), but by yesterday evening, the residential streets had mostly melted off, so not too bad.

As I remember growing up in Overland Park, if it snowed 2", a plow came down your street. And if it kept snowing, they would come by multiple times.
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Old 02-22-2013, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Cleverly concealed
889 posts, read 1,429,027 times
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We're going to be hit again on Sunday night/Monday morning too, so the kids around town might have a five-day weekend.

The major problem with clearing snow in KC is how the snow falls. Normally, our winter storms are not gentle snow storms. The snow is often accompanied by high wind, then a deep freeze immediately afterward. The wind just blows the snow back over the cleared streets. We didn't have the extreme wind yesterday. But it was still tough. Even the emergency vehicles and snow plows got stuck around town. The road crews may have cleared a path on the highways, but they ignored the ramps, from what I could see on scout cameras.

Another problem: KCMO only plows residential streets from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. I wouldn't want to be the driver who has to plow a skinny, car-filled street west of the Plaza, though.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,496,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Like the vast majority of the Midwest? Aren't you forgetting Kansas, Missouri, and 2/3 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. And also factoring in the hot summers, this throws in the central and southern portions of Iowa and Nebraska. KC's weather being NOTHING like the rest of the Midwest is really, really stretching the truth. Is it like the Upper Midwest? No. Like the Central Midwest? Depends on the year. Like the Lower Midwest? Yes. If you want a place that is technically in the Midwest region but has no kind of weather like the rest of the Midwest, try Branson, Missouri.
No, the Lower Midwest does not have four very distinct seasons compared to interior areas of the Midwest along and north of 43N latitude. At that latitude you get much more NOTICEABLE changes in daylight hours between Summer and Winter. Until you've experienced the differences and have lived much further north in the Midwest it might be hard for you to understand. The Koppen Classification is only one piece of the puzzle. You also have average temperatures that differ substantially depending on geographic location as well as the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone map that accurately depicts what the lowest average temperature certain geographic regions experience during a typical year. You can find huge differences between the Upper and Lower Midwest by looking at the climate data. The other two important factors are elevation and latitude- that has already been mentioned. The solar declination angle at higher latitudes is somewhat lower in the sky and less directly overhead.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,628 posts, read 6,764,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioSilence View Post
Another problem: KCMO only plows residential streets from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. I wouldn't want to be the driver who has to plow a skinny, car-filled street west of the Plaza, though.
I'm pretty sure my KCMO street has been plowed at night in the past. Maybe in neighborhoods where there's a lot of on-street parking it's only done during the day?

The plow did finally make it today about 2:30 p.m. And to the Star's credit, I got my paper this morning.
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Old 02-23-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,067,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
No, the Lower Midwest does not have four very distinct seasons compared to interior areas of the Midwest along and north of 43N latitude.
That's not what you said though before. You said KC has nothing in common with ANY of the Midwest, which is a blatant lie. I already agreed that KC's weather is not like that of the Upper Midwest, but the Lower Midwest does have four very distinct seasons. Summers in the Upper Midwest are about the same degree of severity as winters in the lower Midwest. I don't care about the daytime angles/etc. You also seem to be trying to discount the Lower Midwest as even being part of the Midwest. The Lower Midwest is just as much a part of the Midwest as the Upper Midwest. In addition, winters in the Upper Midwest tend to be much more severe than even the Central Midwest. I agree that KC's winters are not the same as a place like Des Moines or Omaha, but they are definitely not what I would call mild like the South. More on the moderate side. At the same token, Des Moines and Omaha's winters aren't the same as Cleveland or Minneapolis. KC is culturally, linguistically, and demographically a Midwestern city.
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