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Old 02-23-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,064,929 times
Reputation: 993

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
No, the Lower Midwest does not have four very distinct seasons compared to interior areas of the Midwest along and north of 43N latitude. At that latitude you get much more NOTICEABLE changes in daylight hours between Summer and Winter. Until you've experienced the differences and have lived much further north in the Midwest it might be hard for you to understand. The Koppen Classification is only one piece of the puzzle. You also have average temperatures that differ substantially depending on geographic location as well as the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone map that accurately depicts what the lowest average temperature certain geographic regions experience during a typical year. You can find huge differences between the Upper and Lower Midwest by looking at the climate data. The other two important factors are elevation and latitude- that has already been mentioned. The solar declination angle at higher latitudes is somewhat lower in the sky and less directly overhead.
Note that I never compared the Lower Midwest to the Upper Midwest. YES there are huge differences. You've completely misunderstood me.

There are also huge weather differences between the Deep South and Upper South. And not just that. There are also noticeable cultural differences, accent differences, and a lot of Northern influence in the Upper South. It can make Kentucky seem like a foreign planet compared to Alabama. Yet nobody tries to make those two out to be different regions.
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Old 02-23-2013, 03:16 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,480,827 times
Reputation: 12508
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
That's not what you said though before. You said KC has nothing in common with ANY of the Midwest, which is a blatant lie. I already agreed that KC's weather is not like that of the Upper Midwest, but the Lower Midwest does have four very distinct seasons. Summers in the Upper Midwest are about the same degree of severity as winters in the lower Midwest. I don't care about the daytime angles/etc. You also seem to be trying to discount the Lower Midwest as even being part of the Midwest. The Lower Midwest is just as much a part of the Midwest as the Upper Midwest. In addition, winters in the Upper Midwest tend to be much more severe than even the Central Midwest. I agree that KC's winters are not the same as a place like Des Moines or Omaha, but they are definitely not what I would call mild like the South. More on the moderate side. At the same token, Des Moines and Omaha's winters aren't the same as Cleveland or Minneapolis. KC is culturally, linguistically, and demographically a Midwestern city.
Actually many areas of the Great Lakes region have average Summer high temperatures that are substantially lower than any area of the Lower Midwest. Highs in the 70s or low 80s would be common in this region. I admit that I am biased toward preferring climates that feature more snowfall in the Winter season and my dislike for high temperatures combined with humidity. The sun angle is rather important item to consider since the Lower Midwest has a low latitude. It makes it easier for the sun to heat the surface without colder airmasses present. This is a big reason why states like Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan have RECORD winter high temperatures that tend to be in the 40s and 50s. Those high temperatures tend to occur every other day or third day during the winter in the Lower Midwest.
Kansas City is fairly close to the peripheral edge of the Midwest region. If you have visited the newer developed areas of the past 20-25 years in Johnson County, KS you can clearly see in the build environment, culture, lifestyles, of many of the people that they are trying to distance themselves as much as possible from the Midwest as a whole. It would be interesting to see what would happen to all the Sunbelt transplants in KC if the region got hit with a very snowy or cold winter. They would likely do lots of complaining, buy tickets to the stereotypical tropical destinations, and then realize they still couldn't afford to move back to California!
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Old 02-23-2013, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,064,929 times
Reputation: 993
It depends on which peripheral edge you're talking about. If you're talking about the southern edge, KC is just above the beginning of the transition zone to the South, which takes place roughly over 100 miles. If you're talking about the western edge of the Midwest, again, I'd say the western edge of the Midwest lies roughly 100-200 miles to the west of KC.
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Old 02-23-2013, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Cleverly concealed
889 posts, read 1,428,099 times
Reputation: 887
The models are generally predicting 10-12" of snow, but starting closer to Monday night. One model predicts 20", which would paralyze Kansas City for a month.
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,625 posts, read 6,759,161 times
Reputation: 4630
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioSilence View Post
....... 20", which would paralyze Kansas City for a month.
I was going to call you on this, thinking this had happened at least twice that I could remember, and I find I'm way wrong. New Year's Eve 1978 was 10.5" total, and Christmas Eve 2009 was 9.1"

...Kansas City Winter Weather Statistics Page...

So I apologize for almost calling you a liar, and happy I saved face
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioSilence View Post
The models are generally predicting 10-12" of snow, but starting closer to Monday night. One model predicts 20", which would paralyze Kansas City for a month.
We had 24" here in Denver back in 2006 and we've never had that much since then. They didn't even plow the residential streets and it was horrible, but I wouldn't say the city was paralyzed. Plus if it happens now, you have the benefit of warmer weather on the near horizon (March) so it wouldn't be around for a month. We just had 9" yesterday in Denver from the storm moving your way and with temps predicted around 60 by next weekend, it'll be mostly gone in a week.

From what I remember growing up in KC, they're much better at snow removal than Denver is.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Cleverly concealed
889 posts, read 1,428,099 times
Reputation: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Okey Dokie View Post
I was going to call you on this, thinking this had happened at least twice that I could remember, and I find I'm way wrong. New Year's Eve 1978 was 10.5" total, and Christmas Eve 2009 was 9.1"

...Kansas City Winter Weather Statistics Page...

So I apologize for almost calling you a liar, and happy I saved face
I work for a television station. I've been called much worse.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
5,758 posts, read 9,486,551 times
Reputation: 2791
KCMO is towing cars today that arent falling winter weather protocol. My street never got plowed in the last storm because cars park on the street directly across from one another.

Here is a list of locations and cars towed: http://www.kcmo.org/idc/groups/publi...list022413.pdf
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
5,758 posts, read 9,486,551 times
Reputation: 2791
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
What's funny to me (I'm a teacher) is that all the state line area school districts called a snow day the night before, before a shred of snow had even fallen.

Where I'm from (upper midwest, MUCH more regular snowfall of substance), you typically do NOT call a snow day unless it is actively snowing, and they really typically don't get called the night before based on the weight of predictions alone. But, then, those regions are more practiced at removal. Not that it was a bad thing to have school cancelled today, but it's so foreign to me, still, after five years here, to be somewhere where snow days area called preemptively.
I have lived here my whole life and that is the first time I remember that happening. I think it was because of the certainty of the storm and both the Kansas Governor and KC Mayor declearing a state of emergency.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:36 AM
 
2,195 posts, read 2,145,372 times
Reputation: 1916
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kansas City is fairly close to the peripheral edge of the Midwest region.
But not as close to that periphery as Cleveland, Detroit and Cincinnati...
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