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Old 04-30-2015, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,504,291 times
Reputation: 5415

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The trend continues and the gap is widening. 10-15 years ago, most new homes in all of metro KC were in Johnson County. That trend has eroded over the years as new development in the MO suburbs and urban KCMO has rebounded. From 2014 to 2015, the MO side has gained yet another 10% of the market.

Clay County alone built about the same number of new homes as Johnson County and considering that most new residents in Clay commute to places like Johnson County clear across the metro, that's pretty impressive. While JoCo is the fastest growing single county statically (barely), the Northland (Clay/Platte) remains the hottest suburban growth area of KC building more new homes in a smaller area (despite it being technically two counties) than Johnson County. All MO side counties are seeing growth while despite all the subsidized commercial development around the speedway, housing in WyCo is extremely lethargic leaving little growth outside of JoCo.

This really goes against those that say people prefer JoCo and JoCo is the only desirable area of Metro KC. Lots of people are choosing JoCo, but they are also choosing other areas of KC in equal or greater amounts.

Here are the stats:

MO Side 1056 new permits
Cass 54, Clay 535, Jackson 396, Platte 71

KS Side 625 new permits
Johnson 560, Leavenworth 38, Wyandotte 17, Miami 10

http://www.kchba.org/wp-content/uplo...Statistics.pdf

Last edited by kcmo; 04-30-2015 at 02:38 PM..
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:07 PM
 
Location: kansas city
78 posts, read 84,324 times
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Why do you think that is ? Is it because of Brownback's crazy self or people seeing that there are other great parts of the city ? Maybe its cheaper in Missouri ?
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:18 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,496,158 times
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Originally Posted by CJdekc View Post
Why do you think that is ? Is it because of Brownback's crazy self or people seeing that there are other great parts of the city ? Maybe its cheaper in Missouri ?
Clay County has a better array of properties at differing price points (especially for first time buyers), even newer construction at a lower cost compared to JOCO. Price points for newer construction in JOCO are just inflated by comparison. Resale value for the SW area (Gardner, Edgerton) is hurt by the intermodal facility. I don't think Kansas will be doing well in the near future (next 5-10 years) compared to its neighbors for various reasons. Just look at what is going on in Colorado right now, big growth in many areas. KS is going in the exact opposite direction.
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,504,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJdekc View Post
Why do you think that is ? Is it because of Brownback's crazy self or people seeing that there are other great parts of the city ? Maybe its cheaper in Missouri ?
The MO side has a wider spectrum of housing prices for new construction which helps. At the same time, the MO side also has a sizable amount of upper bracket housing. While the average new home price is less in the MO side counties than in Johnson County, that is only because there there are more price points. A large portion of the new homes in all the MO side counties are just as expensive as those in JoCo. I would guess that the MO side is capturing about the same amount (or a little more) of the upper bracket housing as JoCo. But the MO side is also capturing nearly all the other price points that JoCo is not. That's probably the biggest difference.

I also think that politics plays some role for those that are looking down the road a little. It's pretty clear that Kansas is going to struggle fiscally in the coming years and that will effect some of the main reasons people choose Kansas in the first place such as public school funding.

The MO side also offers far more options for different people (more varied topography, waterfront or near lakes, proximity to downtown, KCI and Missouri Lakes, urban housing, new urbanism in suburbs etc) while the KS side is pretty limited in options to traditional sprawl in the gridded out often barren areas of Johnson County that are getting really far from regional assets (KCI, Stadiums, Downtown, Plaza, Zoo etc). Because WyCo is so stagnant with new construction and new development is so far south and west in JoCo, suburban residential development is migrating back to MO. You can buy a brand new home in Platte County and still be ten minutes to Downtown, KCI etc. 167th and Metcalf is not close to much of anything.

So bottom line is there are just more options and in many cases more value for the same home with similar schools. After decades of people being pushed to JoCo by the real estate industry, people over the past decade have gone against that grain and migrated to other areas of the metro such as the Northland, Downtown and eastern Jackson County. I also think a lot of it has to to with the internet and people being able to more thoroughly research a metro online vs just moving to the area that everybody they are contact with is telling them to move too.
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Old 05-01-2015, 10:14 AM
 
Location: KC
385 posts, read 810,155 times
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Makes sense really. 4 counties should definitely out match one. I do wish Wyandotte county could get some of that figured out. I agree that the Missouri side has more options in different price points which is great. Pretty much ALL new housing in Johnson County starts above 300,000. I think it helps that the city has finally put the money into infrastructure to take advantage of all that undeveloped space so close to downtown. As for Gardner, I haven't seen any negative affects from the inter-modal whatsoever. Home values increased pretty well the past two years and homes that are for sale are lasting about 2 days on the market. I think what you're seeing overall is that Kansas City is a quality place to live and that finally it's developing in a common sense way.
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,496,158 times
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Originally Posted by pioneer88 View Post
Makes sense really. 4 counties should definitely out match one. I do wish Wyandotte county could get some of that figured out. I agree that the Missouri side has more options in different price points which is great. Pretty much ALL new housing in Johnson County starts above 300,000. I think it helps that the city has finally put the money into infrastructure to take advantage of all that undeveloped space so close to downtown. As for Gardner, I haven't seen any negative affects from the inter-modal whatsoever. Home values increased pretty well the past two years and homes that are for sale are lasting about 2 days on the market. I think what you're seeing overall is that Kansas City is a quality place to live and that finally it's developing in a common sense way.
Now, if they could just get widespread mixed use development it would be much better. The NIMBY crowd in southern JOCO does not want another highway built but the traffic on some of the surface roads is quite absurd. As for Gardner, watch for the semi tractor growth and other related traffic get far worse in the area related to the inter-modal growth. It pales in comparison to the nightmare 435 corridor and all the houses in the right-of-way. That was a zoning failure of epic proportions by Overland Park, but most people have no idea what the area was like 30-40 years ago..
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:25 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
7,656 posts, read 5,643,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Now, if they could just get widespread mixed use development it would be much better. The NIMBY crowd in southern JOCO does not want another highway built but the traffic on some of the surface roads is quite absurd. As for Gardner, watch for the semi tractor growth and other related traffic get far worse in the area related to the inter-modal growth. It pales in comparison to the nightmare 435 corridor and all the houses in the right-of-way. That was a zoning failure of epic proportions by Overland Park, but most people have no idea what the area was like 30-40 years ago..
I know what the area was like then because I moved there in '76. I-435 was already complete through Overland Park and Lenexa and it is hardly a nightmare.

Is there some noise in close proximity? Of course, just like there is in close proximity to every other major interstate highway anywhere in the world.

Why do you repeatedly single it out as though it is any different or any worse than any other similar highway, found anywhere and everywhere across the USA?

I-435 serves a valuable purpose in the metro, just as I-680 does in Omaha or I-494 does in Minneapolis. If you want to hear some real noise, come out here and listen to I-580 roar 24/7.
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Old 05-01-2015, 04:04 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,496,158 times
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Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
I know what the area was like then because I moved there in '76. I-435 was already complete through Overland Park and Lenexa and it is hardly a nightmare.

Is there some noise in close proximity? Of course, just like there is in close proximity to every other major interstate highway anywhere in the world.

Why do you repeatedly single it out as though it is any different or any worse than any other similar highway, found anywhere and everywhere across the USA?

I-435 serves a valuable purpose in the metro, just as I-680 does in Omaha or I-494 does in Minneapolis. If you want to hear some real noise, come out here and listen to I-580 roar 24/7.
I use it as a reference to how overbuilt 435 is currently. Is 10 lanes combined really necessary? I think not. Long-time residents anywhere close to 435 have no choice in the matter as everything is rubber stamped unless they choose to move elsewhere. That is a quality of life problem in my book. Sound barriers and walls make little difference when huge zoning errors occurred that did not account for huge expansions of existing infrastructure. In my opinion, buffer zones should exist to prevent any type of residential housing to be built too close to interstate highways that have high numbers of total lanes. Commercial development should be prioritized over anything else in that case. I think if you came back and actually visited JOCO you would not recognize much of anything in terms of the development, infrastructure, built environment, etc compared to the 70s and 80s.
I am not a city person, I have lived in places that are larger than I prefer due to my career field. My ideal place to live would be in a completely rural area that is not too far from a smaller city. I am trying to make that a reality.
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Old 05-02-2015, 04:43 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
7,656 posts, read 5,643,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I use it as a reference to how overbuilt 435 is currently. Is 10 lanes combined really necessary? I think not. Long-time residents anywhere close to 435 have no choice in the matter as everything is rubber stamped unless they choose to move elsewhere. That is a quality of life problem in my book. Sound barriers and walls make little difference when huge zoning errors occurred that did not account for huge expansions of existing infrastructure. In my opinion, buffer zones should exist to prevent any type of residential housing to be built too close to interstate highways that have high numbers of total lanes. Commercial development should be prioritized over anything else in that case. I think if you came back and actually visited JOCO you would not recognize much of anything in terms of the development, infrastructure, built environment, etc compared to the 70s and 80s.
I am not a city person, I have lived in places that are larger than I prefer due to my career field. My ideal place to live would be in a completely rural area that is not too far from a smaller city. I am trying to make that a reality.
Overbuilt? Whether it is or isn't, I can tell you that most Bay Area commuters would trade an abundance for the refreshing privilege it would be to have access to an "overbuilt" highway....as opposed to those here whose capacity was far exceeded 30 years ago and will never come anywhere near meeting demand.

An "overbuilt" highway is a blessing. The nightmares are the under-built systems found in most other metros that are perpetual parking lots for 18 hours a day. I-435 is something that the planners got right and something that is a bonus for area residents.
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:20 AM
 
12,607 posts, read 14,617,198 times
Reputation: 14105
kcmo, you always complain about sprawl when you talk about Johnson County. But if it's on the Missouri side it's a good thing? You discredit yourself with your bias.
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