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View Poll Results: What is Kansas City?
Midwestern 94 61.44%
Transitional from Midwest to West 53 34.64%
Western 6 3.92%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-24-2017, 06:18 PM
 
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To throw a bit more spice into the discussion, I stumbled upon this article not long ago from a Chicago transplant who argues that Kansas City is actually....Southern.

A Chicago Ex-Pat in Kansas City | Hypertext Magazine

I know Upper Midwesterners tend to think anything south of them is hardcore straw-munchin' rebel-yellin' Dixie, but really?
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Old 01-24-2017, 08:06 PM
 
Location: First Hill, Seattle
5,469 posts, read 5,774,125 times
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Historically, Kansas City was more oriented to the West than the East. It was one of the main staging areas for pioneers headed west due to the confluence of three major westward trails. It was the last stop before the frontier for quite some time (yes, this can be said about many cities, but being at the edge of the vast Great Plains, I'm sure it felt more like the frontier than cities further east did). The "Westport" neighborhood is so named because it was the area where this took place, and can still be seen with the iconic pioneer wagons. And of course the Missouri River was the venue of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Nearby Fort Leavenworth was the sole outfitter for troops during the Mexican American War which took place entirely in the Western US (which was then part of Mexico.) The troops deployed for campaigns into Alta California and New Mexico shipped from Leavenworth. The KC area historically played a far more important role in westward expansion and other historical events than most other Midwestern cities, though it wasn't the only Midwestern city to do so.

I think the "West" is about more than rodeos and libertarians. You have to consider the historical context as well and the shared experiences of the region as a whole, just as with any other region. Not saying this means KC is the West, it's not, but it certainly played its role in helping the West become what it is.
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Old 01-24-2017, 08:28 PM
 
1,386 posts, read 716,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightonMan84 View Post
To throw a bit more spice into the discussion, I stumbled upon this article not long ago from a Chicago transplant who argues that Kansas City is actually....Southern.

A Chicago Ex-Pat in Kansas City | Hypertext Magazine

I know Upper Midwesterners tend to think anything south of them is hardcore straw-munchin' rebel-yellin' Dixie, but really?
Again, some of the suburbs of Kansas City have noticeable southern influences such as Lexington for example. The transition zone starts just below Kansas City. I would say the southern influences in KC are more noticeable than St. Louis. St. Louis still has some subtle southern influences though even though the transition zone doesn't start until just south of St. Louis.

Both cities I don't think have enough influences to even put them in the transition zone classification. Maybe KC city itself has 15 percent southern influence. St. Louis maybe 10 percent.
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Old 01-24-2017, 08:47 PM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,438,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Historically, Kansas City was more oriented to the West than the East. It was one of the main staging areas for pioneers headed west due to the confluence of three major westward trails. It was the last stop before the frontier for quite some time (yes, this can be said about many cities, but being at the edge of the vast Great Plains, I'm sure it felt more like the frontier than cities further east did). The "Westport" neighborhood is so named because it was the area where this took place, and can still be seen with the iconic pioneer wagons. And of course the Missouri River was the venue of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Nearby Fort Leavenworth was the sole outfitter for troops during the Mexican American War which took place entirely in the Western US (which was then part of Mexico.) The troops deployed for campaigns into Alta California and New Mexico shipped from Leavenworth. The KC area historically played a far more important role in westward expansion and other historical events than most other Midwestern cities, though it wasn't the only Midwestern city to do so.

I think the "West" is about more than rodeos and libertarians. You have to consider the historical context as well and the shared experiences of the region as a whole, just as with any other region. Not saying this means KC is the West, it's not, but it certainly played its role in helping the West become what it is.
It's not just rodeos and libertarians.

It's rodeo loving rebels who happened to wrangle cattle who were such free spirits that their offspring and subsequent generations led movements based on free expression and rebelling. The West has always always had a reputation of espousing the most liberty. It always has been Wild. From cowboys and Indians to sheriff deputies to hippies to cutthroat Silicon Valley and Hollywood. It's a wild life from the start. You either live off the less than arable land or pay a fortunate to be Coastal. The Spirit of the West has always been that of the independent rebel.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
5,498 posts, read 5,155,447 times
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Historically, Kansas City was more oriented to the West than the East. It was one of the main staging areas for pioneers headed west due to the confluence of three major westward trails. It was the last stop before the frontier for quite some time (yes, this can be said about many cities, but being at the edge of the vast Great Plains, I'm sure it felt more like the frontier than cities further east did). The "Westport" neighborhood is so named because it was the area where this took place, and can still be seen with the iconic pioneer wagons. And of course the Missouri River was the venue of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Nearby Fort Leavenworth was the sole outfitter for troops during the Mexican American War which took place entirely in the Western US (which was then part of Mexico.) The troops deployed for campaigns into Alta California and New Mexico shipped from Leavenworth. The KC area historically played a far more important role in westward expansion and other historical events than most other Midwestern cities, though it wasn't the only Midwestern city to do so.

I think the "West" is about more than rodeos and libertarians. You have to consider the historical context as well and the shared experiences of the region as a whole, just as with any other region. Not saying this means KC is the West, it's not, but it certainly played its role in helping the West become what it is.



Thank you, Bluefox. This truly makes sense, given Kansas City's geographical location and the story of the expansion westward. St. Louis and Kansas City both played a big part of the expansion to the West.
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
Again, some of the suburbs of Kansas City have noticeable southern influences such as Lexington for example. The transition zone starts just below Kansas City. I would say the southern influences in KC are more noticeable than St. Louis. St. Louis still has some subtle southern influences though even though the transition zone doesn't start until just south of St. Louis.

Both cities I don't think have enough influences to even put them in the transition zone classification. Maybe KC city itself has 15 percent southern influence. St. Louis maybe 10 percent.
I wouldn't call Lexington a suburb of KC. Today Lexington seems like a pretty typical rural small town for the region despite its very deep southern history.

Other than some civil war battles taking place in the region mostly by participants from other parts of the state and country, I don't see how KC is or ever has been southern. If KC had its choice, it would have left the state of Missouri and joined Kansas during the civil war. Thank god it didn't. KCMO would probably look like KCK today, only bigger .
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I wouldn't call Lexington a suburb of KC. Today Lexington seems like a pretty typical rural small town for the region despite its very deep southern history.

Other than some civil war battles taking place in the region mostly by participants from other parts of the state and country, I don't see how KC is or ever has been southern. If KC had its choice, it would have left the state of Missouri and joined Kansas during the civil war. Thank god it didn't. KCMO would probably look like KCK today, only bigger .
I agree. Overwhelmingly the attitude of KCitians is that of typical Midwesterners. No Southern attitudes or even a semblance of Southern pride. There are Southern influences but not Southern attitudes.
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I wouldn't call Lexington a suburb of KC.
Doesn't feel like one to me either, but Lafayette County, of which Lexington is the seat, is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area.
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Old 01-26-2017, 01:11 AM
 
1,386 posts, read 716,086 times
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Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I wouldn't call Lexington a suburb of KC. Today Lexington seems like a pretty typical rural small town for the region despite its very deep southern history.

Other than some civil war battles taking place in the region mostly by participants from other parts of the state and country, I don't see how KC is or ever has been southern. If KC had its choice, it would have left the state of Missouri and joined Kansas during the civil war. Thank god it didn't. KCMO would probably look like KCK today, only bigger .
Lexington is 20 miles from KC. Unless you're cherry picking, that's still considered part of the metro area.

Also one thing failed to mention is that Kansas City area was very small during the civil war. It wasn't built up like St. Louis was and doesn't have the history like St. Louis does.

Again not a southern city but has some slightly southern influences. If St. Louis and Kansas City had at least 20 percent influence I'd put them in the transition zone but they don't quite have that. Just south of town yes, that's transition zone starts to begin.

Kansas City has similarities to Wichita, Omaha, Tulsa. St. Louis has similarities to Chicago. However unlike Chicago, St. Louis is lower Midwestern, not upper Midwestern. I don't know how to explain it but even in places like St. Louis there are still some subtle traces of southern influence left that you don't feel in other Midwest areas. Even living in St. Louis county it just felt a little different than the rest of the Midwest.

Again I am not calling KC are Stl southern. However as others point out on here there are some southern influences left in both towns but just not enough to put it in the transition zone.

But as a historical context also KC and Stl had stronger southern influences at one time (1800s) and at one time Missouri was overall a southern state (mid 1800s to maybe even close to 1900). Which today while things have changed, you can still see those influences in Missouri such as religion for example and politics and part of the state is still in the south.

While Missouri overall is a Midwestern state in modern context it certainly is an outlier to the other Midwestern states as the only one that has a decent chunk of the state in the south and a chunk of it in the transition zone.

Missouri is the most southern influenced state in the modern Midwest. You don't see this debate about other Midwest states.
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Old 01-26-2017, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,658 posts, read 1,768,811 times
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Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
Missouri is the most southern influenced state in the modern Midwest. You don't see this debate about other Midwest states.
I prefer to describe my native state thus:

"Missouri is the nation in microcosm."

All it lacks is a coastline. It has just about everything else, including our great national conflict, entirely within its borders.
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