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View Poll Results: What is Kansas City?
Midwestern 94 61.44%
Transitional from Midwest to West 53 34.64%
Western 6 3.92%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-27-2017, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Alaska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I have heard it said by people around the Eastern edge of the Midwest and the Southeast that Kansas City has more of a Western vibe than Midwestern. I find this an odd notion considering Kansas City is almost right in the middle of everything, with influences from all directions thus making it a TRUE Midwest city (I mean you're practically as far from the Atlantic and the Pacific).

For me, the transition to the West begins in the Great Plains. Not in Kansas City or even anywhere in Missouri. We can say places like Rapid City are transitional Midwest to West cities but KC to me is the Midwest and as Midwest as it gets.
^^^This^^^


I agree the "tornado alley" area (which encompasses North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma) is a "transition" zone from the Midwest to the West for the reason you stated.


Fargo, Sioux Falls, Rapid City, Pierre, Omaha, Lincoln, Wichita, Topeka, Tulsa, and Oklahoma City are neither in the Midwest nor are they in the West.


Each of these cities have a blend of the Midwest and the West, which makes them something totally different and unique from these two areas.
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Old 01-27-2017, 01:19 PM
 
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The word "Midwest" was literally invented to describe the swath of America that Kansas City is in the middle of.
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Old 01-27-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
The word "Midwest" was literally invented to describe the swath of America that Kansas City is in the middle of.
KC is located at the far SW periphery of the Midwest. Most of the western 1/2 of the Great Plains states have far more in common with the sparsely populated rural western US than anything in the Midwest where towns and cities are evenly spaced apart most of the time. Those western areas are mostly all frontier counties with fewer than 7 people per square mile as defined by the Census Bureau. Those do not occur anywhere in the Midwest, unless one counts the rural western UP counties of Keweenaw and Ontonagon.
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Old 01-27-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
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All right, we all are in agreement, right? Kansas City is a Midwestern city.
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Old 01-28-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: First Hill, Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phlinak View Post
^^^This^^^


I agree the "tornado alley" area (which encompasses North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma) is a "transition" zone from the Midwest to the West for the reason you stated.


Fargo, Sioux Falls, Rapid City, Pierre, Omaha, Lincoln, Wichita, Topeka, Tulsa, and Oklahoma City are neither in the Midwest nor are they in the West.


Each of these cities have a blend of the Midwest and the West, which makes them something totally different and unique from these two areas.
How is Omaha not a Midwestern city? Not sure what makes it totally different and unique from Kansas City. I find them quite similar with Omaha actually being a bit more Midwestern since it's further north.
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Old 01-28-2017, 11:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
KC is located at the far SW periphery of the Midwest. Most of the western 1/2 of the Great Plains states have far more in common with the sparsely populated rural western US than anything in the Midwest where towns and cities are evenly spaced apart most of the time. Those western areas are mostly all frontier counties with fewer than 7 people per square mile as defined by the Census Bureau. Those do not occur anywhere in the Midwest, unless one counts the rural western UP counties of Keweenaw and Ontonagon.
None of which has a thing to do with what I posted or the fact that KC is a midwestern city, and not a western one. Did you save money with Geico on your car insurance, too? Does wool clothing itch too much for you to feel comfortable in? Are you more of a dog person or a cat person?
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
None of which has a thing to do with what I posted or the fact that KC is a midwestern city, and not a western one. Did you save money with Geico on your car insurance, too? Does wool clothing itch too much for you to feel comfortable in? Are you more of a dog person or a cat person?
The beginning of the western US is very close to KC, however, and the Flint Hills region is a good demarcation of where western features become more common.
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Old 01-28-2017, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
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The beginning of the western US is very close to KC, however, and the Flint Hills region is a good demarcation of where western features become more common.

Si, si, si. I like this as a way of getting to a town or area that is not Kansas City but is one that starts that meld in to the West. Still the Great Plains, but, turning more towards the west. Denver is West. Or is Denver Mountain country? Oh no. Now I've done it.
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Old 01-30-2017, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Center City
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I lived in KC many years ago in the mid-1980s, but have been back a handful of times since, most recently about 2 years ago. I love your city and have always considered it as a city that blends a bit of both. The stockyard, giant Hereford cow overlooking 35 and the chuck wagon welcoming everyone to Old Westport certainly contribute to KC's western feel. I think the fact that it has topographic relief also feels a bit western, unlike flat cities like Columbus or Milwaukee, and the Bottoms makes me feel like I'm in Wyoming.

Yet there's a midwestern quality that predominates that I can't quite put my finger on. Perhaps it's the arts and crafts houses in Hyde Park, the lack of bolo ties and cowboy hats, or the sense that I'm not in Big Sky country. I guess it's more about what's lacking v more about what's present that render it midwestern, in my eyes.

To me, St Louis is a midwestern city that faces east and Kansas City is a midwestern city that faces west.
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Old 01-30-2017, 09:03 AM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,438,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I lived in KC many years ago in the mid-1980s, but have been back a handful of times since, most recently about 2 years ago. I love your city and have always considered it as a city that blends a bit of both. The stockyard, giant Hereford cow overlooking 35 and the chuck wagon welcoming everyone to Old Westport certainly contribute to KC's western feel. I think the fact that it has topographic relief also feels a bit western, unlike flat cities like Columbus or Milwaukee, and the Bottoms makes me feel like I'm in Wyoming.

Yet there's a midwestern quality that predominates that I can't quite put my finger on. Perhaps it's the arts and crafts houses in Hyde Park, the lack of bolo ties and cowboy hats, or the sense that I'm not in Big Sky country. I guess it's more about what's lacking v more about what's present that render it midwestern, in my eyes.

To me, St Louis is a midwestern city that faces east and Kansas City is a midwestern city that faces west.
Doesn't St. Louis have varied topography? Cincinnati does as well. But I do think that as a whole most major Midwest cities are flat. Chicago, Indianapolis, and Detroit certainly are as is Cleveland but Cleveland metro has some changes in elevation. But I will say that yes most really large Midwest city centers are flat.

As far as the actual region of the Midwest though it is only the Upper Midwest that is flat but even then it is a stereotype. Because Wisconsin and Michigan are hilly in regions. The Lower Midwest has the most varied topography when you consider the Knobs which are a lower altitude extension of Appalachia and the Ozarks which themselves are the least flat area between Appalachia and the Rockies. However the parts of the Midwest that are hilly and or mountainous are usually not very populated so it leads people to believe that the Midwest is mostly flat.

However Denver is a Western city and it is flat anyway. However having a view of the Mountains is probably a good indicator you're no longer in the Midwest. That is a big difference between the Midwest and the West for the most part. In many parts of the West even if you are on a plain, you have a view of Mountains. The only parts of the Midwest where this is the case is always the very outer edges like the Plains. Even in Eastern Ohio you can't actually see the Appalachians yet.
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