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View Poll Results: What is Kansas City?
Midwestern 94 61.44%
Transitional from Midwest to West 53 34.64%
Western 6 3.92%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-08-2017, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
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I remember walking with Mrs. elkotronics from our little 2BD shack we rented on Fort Wyman Rd. while I went to college in Rolla, to downtown Rolla. It was sunny and beautiful out. I bought a Revell model of a 1965 Chevy Chevelle Malibu SS at a store down there.


This might sound weird, but it seemed timeless that day. It just as well could have been 1959 that day. I have fond memories of Rolla and look forward to visiting it soon. Very friendly people with a twinge of the south to them.
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Old 03-08-2017, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,658 posts, read 1,768,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
It's that Delta culture that makes its way up there. Basically the lower half of the Illinois Central Line. It's crazy how in a few hundred miles you can go from Midwestern to Deep South with very little Upper South transition period.

Now as far as KC goes, the actual metro has remnants of the Upper South but the city itself and its close burbs don't really. The Southern influence did leave behind marks in Jazz and Barbecue (and those were via the Deep South). Missouri is so interesting. Just driving from the bootheel to KC can give you a taste of three regions. And if you go through St. Louis you can practically feel like you traveled the whole country with its Northeast lite feel.

But see this is why I think Midwestern is the most accurate description of Kansas City. Because it is truly an indicator of MID that ever existed in the country. It's really a true middle city. Yes it looks West but I think the whole concept of the Midwest in general was built on looking West.

Besides even if KC Jazz is popular in Denver, there aren't really any Western cities with well known jazz, barbecue, or Southern lite leftover. That is something that the Midwest can lay claim to. Even places like Chicago were Southern influenced. The West honestly had more Yankee culture permeate it since Northerners had the biggest impact on the West (as far as Americans go).
New Orleans, where jazz was born before it made its way up to Kansas City, isn't really a Deep South city, even if Plessy v. Ferguson involved a train passing through the state. That book identifies Louisiana as "New France," which it says is in some ways the most liberal and tolerant of the nations, and I'd say after spending a summer there that the racial boundaries are more fluid there than they are in the Deep South. (Relevant trivia: The laws of 49 of the 50 states, even those originally settled by the Spanish, are based on English common law. Louisiana's is based on the Napoleonic Code.)

As for the rest of this, I often tell people up my way, "Missouri is the nation in microcosm. All it lacks is a coastline." Sheesh, the Civil War was recapitulated entirely within its borders, and they even had the dress rehearsal for it in our area - "Bleeding Kansas."

However: there are two Midwests, the agricultural one and the industrial one. The Mississippi separates the one from the other, though both contain both elements. The latter is more Eastern-oriented, though once again you find Appalachia along the banks of the Ohio. (Our geographical references get screwed up by our history of territorial expansion. Northwestern University should be in Seattle, not Chicago, but Illinois was part of the territory covered by the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, when no one in the new United States had any idea what the Pacific Northwest even looked like.)
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Old 03-08-2017, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
992 posts, read 500,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
KC, MO is Midwest and KC, KS is Western...hey, it has to start somewhere
Kansas is Midwestern. It is closer to being Southern than Western. This is a map of regions:
KCMO is the pin.


Last edited by Western Urbanite; 03-08-2017 at 11:11 PM..
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Old 03-08-2017, 11:08 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 716,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post
I remember walking with Mrs. elkotronics from our little 2BD shack we rented on Fort Wyman Rd. while I went to college in Rolla, to downtown Rolla. It was sunny and beautiful out. I bought a Revell model of a 1965 Chevy Chevelle Malibu SS at a store down there.


This might sound weird, but it seemed timeless that day. It just as well could have been 1959 that day. I have fond memories of Rolla and look forward to visiting it soon. Very friendly people with a twinge of the south to them.
That describes it well. It's a town firmly in the transition zone. South of town the influences get stronger though. Not until you get down to around Salem, then it becomes more dominantly southern overall. Rolla overall I would say has slightly more Midwestern influences than southern ones. Maybe like 40-45 percent southern and 55-60 percent Midwestern.

Places like Rolla/St. James are a good example of a transition zone city for Missouri, and Carbondale is a good example of a transition zone city for IL.
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Old 03-09-2017, 06:23 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 983,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Western Urbanite View Post
Kansas is Midwestern. It is closer to being Southern than Western. This is a map of regions:
KCMO is the pin.
What is the source for this map? It implies that all of Oklahoma is in the south, but I was born and raised in the Tulsa area, and I'll guarantee you that virtually all Tulsans consider themselves Midwesterners. Only those in the southern part of the state might be outside this designation.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:01 AM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,438,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
New Orleans, where jazz was born before it made its way up to Kansas City, isn't really a Deep South city, even if Plessy v. Ferguson involved a train passing through the state. That book identifies Louisiana as "New France," which it says is in some ways the most liberal and tolerant of the nations, and I'd say after spending a summer there that the racial boundaries are more fluid there than they are in the Deep South. (Relevant trivia: The laws of 49 of the 50 states, even those originally settled by the Spanish, are based on English common law. Louisiana's is based on the Napoleonic Code.)

As for the rest of this, I often tell people up my way, "Missouri is the nation in microcosm. All it lacks is a coastline." Sheesh, the Civil War was recapitulated entirely within its borders, and they even had the dress rehearsal for it in our area - "Bleeding Kansas."

However: there are two Midwests, the agricultural one and the industrial one. The Mississippi separates the one from the other, though both contain both elements. The latter is more Eastern-oriented, though once again you find Appalachia along the banks of the Ohio. (Our geographical references get screwed up by our history of territorial expansion. Northwestern University should be in Seattle, not Chicago, but Illinois was part of the territory covered by the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, when no one in the new United States had any idea what the Pacific Northwest even looked like.)
While NOLA isn't reminiscent of the Deep South, I don't know if New France is such an accurate representation especially since the French influence there was overtaken by many other elements including Irish and Italian. Of course these don't make it more Southern (probably less). But barbecue did make its way to KC from the Southern Blacks as I understand it. And even if NOLA isn't Deep South, its influence certainly doesn't make KC more Western because there is nothing Western about Louisiana.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:03 AM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,438,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Western Urbanite View Post
Kansas is Midwestern. It is closer to being Southern than Western. This is a map of regions:
KCMO is the pin.

What is this map?
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:35 AM
 
Location: IN
20,168 posts, read 34,480,827 times
Reputation: 12507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Western Urbanite View Post
Kansas is Midwestern. It is closer to being Southern than Western. This is a map of regions:
KCMO is the pin.
I wouldn't classify the western Plains as Midwest at all, they are much more aligned toward the western US across the board.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:36 AM
 
Location: IN
20,168 posts, read 34,480,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
What is the source for this map? It implies that all of Oklahoma is in the south, but I was born and raised in the Tulsa area, and I'll guarantee you that virtually all Tulsans consider themselves Midwesterners. Only those in the southern part of the state might be outside this designation.
Tulsa is much too far south to be part of the Midwest, I'm not sure why the locals there consider themselves to be part of the region- other than not being very familiar with how the vast majority of the Midwest is really like.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,658 posts, read 1,768,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
But barbecue did make its way to KC from the Southern Blacks as I understand it.
Absolutely. Memphis is to KC barbecue as New Orleans is to KC jazz - the rootstock from which the transplant flourished.

But it's equally relevant to note that both found uniquely fertile soil here. KC already had a strong culture of celebrations involving the grilling of meats, and it's a short step from cooking over coals to low and slow with smoke.

Similarly, the Pendergast machine provided the environment in which the musicians could do their thing and the booze that their audiences lapped up.
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