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View Poll Results: What is Kansas City?
Midwestern 94 61.44%
Transitional from Midwest to West 53 34.64%
Western 6 3.92%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-09-2017, 08:50 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 983,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Tulsa is much too far south to be part of the Midwest, I'm not sure why the locals there consider themselves to be part of the region- other than not being very familiar with how the vast majority of the Midwest is really like.
This comment is borderline offensive. As if Tulsans "don't get out much".

If you really want to divvy up the regions according to state lines, sure. I could see Oklahoma going in any of three different regions. But take it from a guy who grew up there: the entire northeast quadrant of Oklahoma is culturally indistinguishable from eastern Kansas. It seems a little counter-intuitive, but southern Missouri is actually more southern than northern Oklahoma. I think this is because of the Ozark Mountains, but also because of completely different settlement patterns that helped define the culture of those areas.
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Old 03-09-2017, 08:58 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I would say the 100th meridian is a solid dividing line between the agrarian areas of the Midwest from the semi-arid ranching areas of the West that are occasionally mixed in with irrigation agriculture. Central and western Nebraska are certainly more like the West than the Midwest, whilst eastern Nebraska is solidly Midwest.
Ding ding ding !!! We have a winner. That's how it is in Texas. Things start to look more "western" around 100 degree longitude , at least stereoptypical Western when judged by the standards the old Westerns and cowboy movies and TV shows that showed us what the West looks like.

Last edited by Ivory Lee Spurlock; 03-09-2017 at 09:07 AM..
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Old 03-09-2017, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
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That describes it well. It's a town firmly in the transition zone. South of town the influences get stronger though. Not until you get down to around Salem, then it becomes more dominantly southern overall. Rolla overall I would say has slightly more Midwestern influences than southern ones. Maybe like 40-45 percent southern and 55-60 percent Midwestern.

Places like Rolla/St. James are a good example of a transition zone city for Missouri, and Carbondale is a good example of a transition zone city for IL.


Rolla was our landing point to the Midwest. It is mellow, has a great exercise place in it called The Centre, and is small with not much pretentiousness. It has a Sonic, at least one McDonald's, a JC Penney (at least it had one), a good small park, some good walking areas downtown and a branch of the U of Missouri that teaches engineering and mining. I think back fondly of it - not to mention a good vet near Wal*Mart. Helped us take care of our ailing Abbey, our 10 year old Pomeranian would died of CHF. That event broke my heart in two.

Buried her in Missouri Conservation Society land SW of St. Louis. She loved Daddy (me) with all of her heart. While I studied my Respiratory Therapy textbooks she would lie at my feet throughout the night. So adorable and so loyal.
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Old 03-09-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: IN
20,168 posts, read 34,480,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
This comment is borderline offensive. As if Tulsans "don't get out much".

If you really want to divvy up the regions according to state lines, sure. I could see Oklahoma going in any of three different regions. But take it from a guy who grew up there: the entire northeast quadrant of Oklahoma is culturally indistinguishable from eastern Kansas. It seems a little counter-intuitive, but southern Missouri is actually more southern than northern Oklahoma. I think this is because of the Ozark Mountains, but also because of completely different settlement patterns that helped define the culture of those areas.
Well, I'm also quite familiar with Tulsa as my mother's parents lived there for many years and a sibling of mine graduated from the local university there. Neither my grandparents, parents, or any of their friends ever considered Tulsa to be part of the Midwest region. The default is "Native America." Tulsa is a hybrid of the South-Central Plains, at the periphery of the Greater Ozarks Region, and has some influences from the Southwest and Southeast US. Tulsa received a greater infusion of wealth during the early to mid 20th century due to the energy extraction economy, and had more people migrate there from the eastern US during that time period. That "old money" influence is now more diluted with time, but still visible in certain areas of the city- hence a bit of "Midwest" influence. If anything, I would say the metro area is becoming more southern with time due to surrounding counties demographics and migration patterns.
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Old 03-09-2017, 05:20 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 716,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Well, I'm also quite familiar with Tulsa as my mother's parents lived there for many years and a sibling of mine graduated from the local university there. Neither my grandparents, parents, or any of their friends ever considered Tulsa to be part of the Midwest region. The default is "Native America." Tulsa is a hybrid of the South-Central Plains, at the periphery of the Greater Ozarks Region, and has some influences from the Southwest and Southeast US. Tulsa received a greater infusion of wealth during the early to mid 20th century due to the energy extraction economy, and had more people migrate there from the eastern US during that time period. That "old money" influence is now more diluted with time, but still visible in certain areas of the city- hence a bit of "Midwest" influence. If anything, I would say the metro area is becoming more southern with time due to surrounding counties demographics and migration patterns.
I'd consider it a hybrid southern, sorta like what Joplin is. I would not consider Tulsa as southern as Branson or Poplar Bluff for example. Granted Branson and Poplar Bluff have no Midwestern influences though.
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:37 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 983,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Well, I'm also quite familiar with Tulsa as my mother's parents lived there for many years and a sibling of mine graduated from the local university there. Neither my grandparents, parents, or any of their friends ever considered Tulsa to be part of the Midwest region. The default is "Native America." Tulsa is a hybrid of the South-Central Plains, at the periphery of the Greater Ozarks Region, and has some influences from the Southwest and Southeast US. Tulsa received a greater infusion of wealth during the early to mid 20th century due to the energy extraction economy, and had more people migrate there from the eastern US during that time period. That "old money" influence is now more diluted with time, but still visible in certain areas of the city- hence a bit of "Midwest" influence. If anything, I would say the metro area is becoming more southern with time due to surrounding counties demographics and migration patterns.
Are you saying your family considered themselves, not Midwesterners, but part of "Native America"? I thought that was just a marketing slogan for license plates and tourism brochures. Unless your family is actually Native American by blood, it's bothersome to think that this is how they identified themselves.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:07 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 716,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
Are you saying your family considered themselves, not Midwesterners, but part of "Native America"? I thought that was just a marketing slogan for license plates and tourism brochures. Unless your family is actually Native American by blood, it's bothersome to think that this is how they identified themselves.
I would say Tulsa has more southern influence than Oklahoma city.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:47 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
Are you saying your family considered themselves, not Midwesterners, but part of "Native America"? I thought that was just a marketing slogan for license plates and tourism brochures. Unless your family is actually Native American by blood, it's bothersome to think that this is how they identified themselves.
No, that is the default slogan of the state. None of our family or our friends considered Tulsa to be the Midwest at all. It is a hybrid of the South-Central Plains, Southeast US, and Upland South.
It is much more aligned with the southern US overall.
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Old 03-10-2017, 01:38 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 716,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
No, that is the default slogan of the state. None of our family or our friends considered Tulsa to be the Midwest at all. It is a hybrid of the South-Central Plains, Southeast US, and Upland South.
It is much more aligned with the southern US overall.
I agree. I think it's a bit too far west to be heavily influenced by the southeast. I consider it similar to Joplin as it's a hybrid type city with influences from the south, Ozarks, and plains/midwest since it's so close to Kansas.
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Noo Yawk, Noo Yawk
624 posts, read 1,285,718 times
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The US Census Bureau considers these states as comprising the Midwestern region:
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Wikipedia says that the Census Bureau had previously called them the North Central states, officially.


Below is another map that shows how the Census Bureau breaks down all the regions. They've designated four major ones -- Northeast, South, Midwest, and West -- each with their own sub-regions. For example, the Mid-Atlantic is part of the Northeast (and yet I recall a thread where people were arguing that Pennsylvania is part of the Midwest). This map has Maryland and Delaware as Southern Atlantic, but I always tended to think of them as Mid-Atlantic.

The odd thing is they've divided the West into Pacific and Mountain, but did not label the Southwest. Nor does the map have a label for the Plains states, and I've never heard anyone talk about any "East South Central" states!:


Although an editor has made a note asking for a citation on this statement, here's an interesting tidbit from Wikipedia and I wonder how accurate it is: "Traditional definitions of the Midwest include the Northwest Ordinance Old Northwest states and many states that were part of the Louisiana Purchase. The states of the Old Northwest are also known as Great Lakes states and are east-north central in the United States. The Ohio River runs along the southeastern section while the Mississippi River runs north to south near the center. Many of the Louisiana Purchase states in the west-north central United States, are also known as Great Plains states, where the Missouri River is a major waterway joining with the Mississippi. The Midwest lies north of the 3630′ parallel that the 1820 Missouri Compromise established as the dividing line between future slave and non-slave states."
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