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View Poll Results: What is Kansas City?
Midwestern 94 61.44%
Transitional from Midwest to West 53 34.64%
Western 6 3.92%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-10-2017, 07:03 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Kansas City is about as Midwestern as a city can be, sitting smack dab in the middle of country, (the Lower 48, that is).There's no two ways about it. If it is ever decided that the Capital of the United States needs to be relocated to a more centrally located city, the obvious choice would be Kansas City, or at least somewhere in that stretch of land that straddles the Kansas-Missouri-Nebraska-Iowa border between Kansas City and Omaha.

I don't think the State of Kansas seems western until you get out into the Great Plains and there's hardly any trees. And the State of Missouri doesn't feel Southern, either, at least to me, it doesn't. Whenever I was in Missouri, it never crossed my mind that Missouri is a Southern State. Not Branson or Sprinfield or the Boot Heal caused me to wonder if I was in the South or the Midwest.

I understand Missouri was a Border State and was recognized by the Confederacy, and there may be a high proportion of Southern natives in those areas of Missouri, but they are Southerners living in the Midwest. They are not Southerners living in the South.
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Old 07-10-2017, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,653 posts, read 1,767,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I understand Missouri was a Border State and was recognized by the Confederacy, and there may be a high proportion of Southern natives in those areas of Missouri, but they are Southerners living in the Midwest. They are not Southerners living in the South.
"Missouri is Southern":
  • It wasn't just recognized by the Confederacy, it had two state governments for a while, one pro-Union, one pro-Confederate, and one county in pro-Union territory (Calloway, whose county seat of Fulton is where Churchill delivered his "Iron Curtain" speech in 1945 at Westminster College there) seceded from the state to declare itself in solidarity with the South - briefly.
  • The Assemblies of God church, headquartered in Springfield, is one of the largest charismatic Christian denominations in the country. While not tightly identified with the South, charismatic Christianity is more of a presence in the southerly parts of the country than the northern ones.

Missouri isn't Southern:
  • No Southern state observed Lincoln's birthday as a state holiday, nor did any Southern state name its separate-but-equal black state university for the Great Emancipator. Missouri did both.
  • The University of Missouri itself quietly admitted its first black student in 1950, four years before Brown v. Board of Education. There were no protests, and no Missouri politician "stood in the schoolhouse door" to prevent his registration.

However, Mizzou's bolting the Big 12 for the SEC is IMO a betrayal. Even if the Texans had already wrecked the conference.
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Old 07-10-2017, 07:37 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 715,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Kansas City is about as Midwestern as a city can be, sitting smack dab in the middle of country, (the Lower 48, that is).There's no two ways about it. If it is ever decided that the Capital of the United States needs to be relocated to a more centrally located city, the obvious choice would be Kansas City, or at least somewhere in that stretch of land that straddles the Kansas-Missouri-Nebraska-Iowa border between Kansas City and Omaha.

I don't think the State of Kansas seems western until you get out into the Great Plains and there's hardly any trees. And the State of Missouri doesn't feel Southern, either, at least to me, it doesn't. Whenever I was in Missouri, it never crossed my mind that Missouri is a Southern State. Not Branson or Sprinfield or the Boot Heal caused me to wonder if I was in the South or the Midwest.

I understand Missouri was a Border State and was recognized by the Confederacy, and there may be a high proportion of Southern natives in those areas of Missouri, but they are Southerners living in the Midwest. They are not Southerners living in the South.
The Bootheel and Brason ARE in the south.

There is nothing Midwestern about southeast Missouri. That is the most culturally southern region of the state. The bootheel could be included with western TN, NE AR and northern MS as they're part of the MS Delta. Very southern. Nothing Midwestern about Sikeston.

Branson is pretty southern too in a Ozark upper south way. Last time I was there a couple weeks before summer season started and heard southern accents all over.

Springfield is right on that transition zone line from the transition zone and south. about 10-15 miles north of highway 60 on south in Missouri is southern. Above that line up to highway 50 in the middle of the state is a hybrid zone mix of Midwestern and southern. Above that pretty much all Midwestern.

The southern quarter of Missouri that starts near highway 60 is southern. No one will argue that, and above that line is a transition zone.

Anyone who says the bootheel is Midwestern has never visited there. Also, it's BOOTHEEL not Boot Heal which makes me question this post as well.

People who are living in Popular Bluff, Sikeston, Caruthersville, New Madrid, Branson, West Plains are living in the south. Those places are NOT in the Midwest. This has been talked about many times on here.

Linguistics, religion, culture are southern, not Midwestern in those areas of the state.
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Old 07-10-2017, 07:42 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 715,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
"Missouri is Southern":
  • It wasn't just recognized by the Confederacy, it had two state governments for a while, one pro-Union, one pro-Confederate, and one county in pro-Union territory (Calloway, whose county seat of Fulton is where Churchill delivered his "Iron Curtain" speech in 1945 at Westminster College there) seceded from the state to declare itself in solidarity with the South - briefly.
  • The Assemblies of God church, headquartered in Springfield, is one of the largest charismatic Christian denominations in the country. While not tightly identified with the South, charismatic Christianity is more of a presence in the southerly parts of the country than the northern ones.

Missouri isn't Southern:
  • No Southern state observed Lincoln's birthday as a state holiday, nor did any Southern state name its separate-but-equal black state university for the Great Emancipator. Missouri did both.
  • The University of Missouri itself quietly admitted its first black student in 1950, four years before Brown v. Board of Education. There were no protests, and no Missouri politician "stood in the schoolhouse door" to prevent his registration.

However, Mizzou's bolting the Big 12 for the SEC is IMO a betrayal. Even if the Texans had already wrecked the conference.
Also, don't forget southern Baptist are the largest denomination in Missouri as well.

One thing I will say from moving back to Florida is that overall Missouri has a much more evangelical, bible belt feel to the state than Florida does.

Florida has been so watered down by New Englanders and hispanics. Missouri the bible belt evangelical presence has much more influence over state politics I think that it does here in FL.
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Old 07-10-2017, 08:47 PM
 
482 posts, read 215,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Mizzou's bolting the Big 12 for the SEC is IMO a betrayal.
I'm not a big Mizzou fan, but when they went to the SEC I was definitely like, WTF? Next thing you know they're gonna be trying to put Michigan in the SEC ...
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Old 07-10-2017, 08:52 PM
 
1,383 posts, read 715,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasgoldrush View Post
I'm not a big Mizzou fan, but when they went to the SEC I was definitely like, WTF? Next thing you know they're gonna be trying to put Michigan in the SEC ...
Except Missouri has a certain amount of ties with the South, MI does not.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:19 AM
 
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It's not midwestern in the same way Wisconsin, Chicago, Minnesota and Michigan are midwestern. They've got more northern type cities that have those northern accents and certain character traits that often make them distinctly different than a more southern geographically located place like KC.

That's what makes KC so interesting to me is that its location puts it with lots of opportunity to have influence from every direction. On the Kansas side, it borders Colorado, which is often considered southwestern. Missouri borders Tennessee, a southeastern state. Illinois borders Missouri as well, and it has Chicago, a huge city with lots of northern influence, but considered by some a more eastern city. I think the main thing here is yeah it's midwestern, but hop in the car for 7 hours any direction and you'll be in either the nothern part of the U.S., the southern part, eastern, western, southeastern, closer to the northeastern, southwestern, or northwestern (maybe more like 10 hours). That's why I voted transitional.

I agree with what much of the thread has mentioned in terms of western-ness starting in mid-Nebraska, mid-Kansas, mid-South Dakota, mid-North Dakota.

To me, North and Central Oklahoma, North Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota are its own part of the midwest. They each have midwest influence from the east and some western influence from the west...some more and less than others. Obviously Texas, Oklahoma being more southwest and Arkansas and Missouri having more southeastern influence. And with Texas being as big as it is, it can be considered to have a more southern midwestern influence in Dallas, but more true southern in Houston, and southwestern in San Antonio and west to El Paso.

While east of the Mississippi River states like Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Indiana are more rust-belty industrial and less culturally influenced by the west.

Last edited by kc_beast; 10-04-2017 at 01:45 AM..
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Old 10-04-2017, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,653 posts, read 1,767,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kc_beast View Post
It's not midwestern in the same way Wisconsin, Chicago, Minnesota and Michigan are midwestern. They've got more northern type cities that have those northern accents and certain character traits that often make them distinctly different than a more southern geographically located place like KC.

That's what makes KC so interesting to me is that its location puts it with lots of opportunity to have influence from every direction. On the Kansas side, it borders Colorado, which is often considered southwestern. Missouri borders Tennessee, a southeastern state. Illinois borders Missouri as well, and it has Chicago, a huge city with lots of northern influence, but considered by some a more eastern city. I think the main thing here is yeah it's midwestern, but hop in the car for 7 hours any direction and you'll be in either the nothern part of the U.S., the southern part, eastern, western, southeastern, closer to the northeastern, southwestern, or northwestern (maybe more like 10 hours). That's why I voted transitional.

I agree with what much of the thread has mentioned in terms of western-ness starting in mid-Nebraska, mid-Kansas, mid-South Dakota, mid-North Dakota.

To me, North and Central Oklahoma, North Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota are its own part of the midwest. They each have midwest influence from the east and some western influence from the west...some more and less than others. Obviously Texas, Oklahoma being more southwest and Arkansas and Missouri having more southeastern influence. And with Texas being as big as it is, it can be considered to have a more southern midwestern influence in Dallas, but more true southern in Houston, and southwestern in San Antonio and west to El Paso.

While east of the Mississippi River states like Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Indiana are more rust-belty industrial and less culturally influenced by the west.
Colorado is more Western than Southwestern: "Southwestern" states have a noticeable Mexican/Hispanic character or cultural influence, something Colorado lacks. New Mexico to its south, however...

I usually refer to the two halves of what we call the Midwest as the "industrial" Midwest and the "agricultural" Midwest, with the Mississippi River the dividing line between the two. Of course, the divide is neither sharp nor neat; Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin all have strong agricultural economies, while you can find significant industry in Missouri and parts of Kansas - even extractive industry in Kansas' southeast corner. (Speaking of extractive industry, the Bakken formation has turned around the fortunes of North Dakota.)

As the tourism-promotion folks for the state used to say, Texas "is like a whole 'nother country." It and Missouri share that cross-cultural character, with influences changing depending on where in the state you are.
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:38 AM
 
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I have to disagree with Colorado not having much Mexican influence. 2015 census reported Colorado having 7th largest hispanic population % in the US. Probably 6th highest Mexican population because Florida is #6 on that list.
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