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Old 02-19-2017, 07:51 PM
 
112 posts, read 66,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I need to preface what follows by noting the following:

Unlike just about everyone else actively participating in this discussion save kcmo, but like a few others who post on the Kansas City forum, I do not live in Kansas City now, but I was born and raised there, and I have pointed out what I see as parallels between my forever and adopted hometowns in essays I've written in Philadelphia magazine, where I am now the Home and Real Estate Editor. I may refer to some of those parallels or similarities below.

But as I tell all my friends and acquaintances up this way, I wouldn't trade growing up in Kansas City for growing up anywhere else in the country. On my two most recent visits, I was pleasantly surprised by how lively and sophisticated the city has become. (You can find online a long feature I wrote for Next City about the Power & Light District, "The $295 Million Mall Taxpayers Bought Kansas City," the outgrowth of my 2014 visit.) Most of the people I know who've visited both it and St. Louis like Kansas City better, fwiw.



No offense taken at all. You will find that I agree with you on some points as well.



I refer to the really big city (5th biggest city and metro in the US) I live in as "a small town masquerading as a big city" because of the everyone-knows-everyone-else quality of its various communities (media, finance, law, education, LGBTQ...) and neighborhoods (East Passyunk, Washington Square West, Mayfair, Germantown...). There seems to be more than a little of this quality about KC too.

But as you note, KC is anything but crowded. I do think that, thanks in large part to the presence of two very real divides - the state line and Troost Avenue - it is more complex than any arrival from the sticks would have experienced. Anyone who grows up in a multistate metropolis (St. Louis, New York, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Chicago to a lesser extent) should recognize many of the dynamics at work in KC, but the fact that KC is truly unique among all of these in being almost evenly split between its two states makes the dynamic a little more intense and the arguments, when they do take place, more vivid - and the city's history adds to the vividness: the reason everyone refers to the economic-development "border war" is because we all learn about the actual one in history classes growing up.



Traffic congestion in Kansas City? It is to laugh. As one writer put it in Harper's back in the 1970s, "Rush hour in Kansas City is like the noonday lull in most East Coast cities." That's still the case now, and I think that contributes to the widespread hostility to public transportation, especially rail, I sense among area residents save for that small but hardy band of urbanites who are backing the streetcar extension but may have their plans stymied by a question that will appear on the ballot this fall. (And that's a shame, for what I've read suggests that the people in the Main Street corridor are willing to tax themselves to make the streetcar a useful commuter route rather than a fun plaything. I say let them, and let's see what it does when it becomes a practical transportation alternative.)

But when I returned to KC in 2014 with a dear friend who lives in Washington in tow (he works in the Washington bureau of The Kansas City Star's corporate parent), he turned to me, referencing conversations we've had about the possibility of my becoming a Kansas Citian once again, and asked, "Do you think you could really live in a city where you had to drive everywhere?"

I replied, "Hmmmmm..." He agreed.

I still have my driver's license but rely on Philadelphia's much more extensive and robust public transit network to get where I want to go. Is it as convenient as hopping behind the wheel? Not in most cases, but in many more than you might suspect, it holds its own against driving, partly because there's so much more traffic here. And as you might gather from my posting handle, I'm a rail transit fan, so I enjoy commuting on the Broad Street Subway every workday.



1. The Plaza is special because of its history - it's the oldest planned shopping center in the United States - and its design and architecture - most shopping centers that followed in its wake were not arrayed around city streets, nor were they as well integrated with the city surrounding them. And it does have office, residential and retail; they're just not all in the same buildings, by and large, and indeed there are no residences in the Plaza proper at all. But unless I'm mistaken, there should still be apartments just up the hill from 47th and Broadway, for instance, and all those apartment towers across Brush Creek from the Plaza house residents still, save for the one that became the Raphael Hotel (is it still called that?). The Plaza's western precincts are largely given to offices, starting around the building at 47th and Pennsylvania I knew as the Skelly Building. The difference between those cool suburban downtowns - and I can rattle off several around me in Philadelphia: Ardmore, Wayne, Media, Collingswood, Haddonfield, Doylestown - and the Plaza is that like the ones you mention, the former all developed (or redeveloped) organically while the Plaza was and remains planned from the start. (In Ardmore, however, you will find Suburban Square, which has billed itself as the oldest planned shopping center in the country, but I had to point out that the Plaza's first building went up in 1921 while Suburban Square dates to 1928-30.)

2. I remember the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s, when the J.C. Nichols Company went about aggressively upscaling the Plaza. Goodbye, Sears; farewell, Woolworth's; bye-bye, bowling alley and supermarket; hello, Halls, here are your new neighbors: Saks Fifth Avenue, Polo Ralph Lauren, Tiffany & Co., Bergdorf Goodman (which acquired Harzfeld's parent Garfinckel's). At that time, there really was nothing like the Plaza anywhere near it. I note that all of these stores save Tiffany's, including hometowner Halls, are gone now, and the stores that have replaced them can be found in a mall near you for the most part (maybe not Kate Spade, but many of the others, yes). To that end, I'd probably join the "save-the-Plaza" crowd, except I'd make it a "bring-back-Kansas City's-Rodeo-Drive" movement. (And the funny thing is, when Nichols was going about the upgrading, I complained to a Nichols Company executive about the disappearance of "my Plaza." She reassured me that there were still plenty of options in Nichols-owned shopping centers like the Landing, which I hear is pretty much moribund now, but I wasn't reassured at the time. Now I'd love to see the Plaza I complained about stage a comeback.)



The real estate industry people I talk to here point out that Kansas City is growing at a fairly strong clip, especially compared to the coastal metropolises. (California is shooting itself in the foot in many ways, but that's another matter.) But let's not overlook the fact that most of the really fast-growing ones are smaller by far than the 50 biggest metros in the US. Granted, growth in large Sunbelt metros, including Dallas-Fort Worth, remains stronger than in any of the metros in the Plains states, though. However, that doesn't negate your last three sentences.



DFW is the only other airport in the US that was designed around the drive-to-your-gate concept first implemented at KCI. The difference is that the DFW terminals are deeper from pickup/dropoff roads (and please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think those are separate at DFW while they're the same at KCI, another key difference) to gates than KCI's by a long shot, which means they don't have the cramped feel of KCI's concourses, and that in turn allowed for better installation of the post-9/11 security theater apparatus all airports must now have. That more than anything else argues for a new terminal (not, as one other poster has noted, a new airport) at KCI. Having flown into and out of it both pre- and post-9/11, I concur that KCI's design and amenities no longer work in the post-9/11 world.



Here you have history as a stumbling block. It's true that today's "border war" is purely economic, but it also shows up in those occasional attempts to obtain funding across the state line for regional assets that are usually located in Kansas City, Mo.; the one such successful effort I can recall is the one that led to the restoration of Union Station (and made Clay Chastain into a pain in the region's collective butt ever since).

I grew up in 64130 but went to school mostly with kids who lived in 66208. I understand your point.



One form of transportation reinforces urbanity; the other undermines it. That would be my short answer to your first question. Most of KC isn't "urban" as we understand it here in the Northeast; even our suburbs are denser in Philadelphia. But there are parts of the city that are indeed both very urban and very urbane, even at the style of development common in the city, and I'd like to strengthen them. Knickerbocker Place shouldn't have half its buildings boarded up. The entire length of Broadway through Valentine should be as lively as Westport. Ditto Main Street from downtown to the Plaza. I hope you see where I'm going with this.

No, the Plaza won't close down. But it won't be truly special as an open-air regional mall with streets.
Very interesting and educational response. Thanks!
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:54 PM
 
112 posts, read 66,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I agree with this. The plaza is still one of the best examples of a mixed use urban district in America. It's no longer the region retail destination it once was, but it's still a very neat area from an architecture and ambiance standpoint and it's still a very desirable place to live work and play.

The problem with the plaza now is the same thing KC seems to have problems with. The Plaza has got to change, evolve, grow and develop in order for it to remain relevant. KC residents (especially organizations like Save the Plaza) need to allow the plaza to evolve into more of a self sustaining urban neighborhood that no longer depends on tourists from Omaha or even Olathe. So it needs new high density housing, new hotels, new office buildings etc so it can support the nearly 1 million sq ft of retail space there. If you don't allow the plaza to change and grow, the plaza will decline.

The plaza also needs to be connected to downtown via the streetcar or over the next decade or two, Downtown will see all the growth while the Plaza area struggles, just like what happened to Downtown in the previous 20 years. The Plaza KC's second downtown and the other bookend of the central urban corridor. Let it grow. Let it change. If you don't, it will change in the wrong direction.

Very well said, in my humble opinion.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:53 PM
Status: "You got to know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Middle America
36,281 posts, read 41,079,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Minor cartographic nit: Your hubby's workplace couldn't be located at "Prospect and Agnes," for those two streets run parallel to each other, four blocks apart. (I was born and raised on Bellefontaine, the next street to Agnes' east.)

Yeah, I caught that, but too late to edit the post (window is what, a few hours?).

What I'd intended to type was Cleaver and Agnes. I figured someone (likely you, given your connection to the neighborhood) would catch it, but, again, missed the editing window.

Quote:
But given that your church is at 39th and Troost, I'll wager that your hubby does work in my old stomping ground of Oak Park Southwest. (39th and Troost itself is in Mannheim, though.)
Church is actually 3800 Troost, corner of Troost and Mannheim, directly across from DeLaSalle. The building is a massive stone and slate structure, formerly St. Mark English Lutheran Church, upon dedication. Now home to St. Mark Hope and Peace Lutheran Church, ELCA, and a hosting building to several other worshiping groups of various faiths who are building partners. 39th and Troost is occupied by St. James Catholic parish, a sometimes partnering faith community.



Quote:
Having gotten this nit out of the way, I will simply say that you're the first person I've encountered on this board who seems to have actually spent lots of time east of Troost (lovekcmo says s/he has friends in my old neck of the woods, but I wonder whether s/he's ever bothered to actually dialogue with them), has bothered to actually interact with the area residents, and doesn't let fear govern their actions. I suspect most of the people conversing here would p**s on themselves were they to find themselves at the major intersection nearest my own East Germantown home here in Philadelphia.
It's mainly due to my church being in the area, and it being a faith community that is very deliberately highly engaged and active with the surrounding community. We are part of a community organizing network that is very focused on local needs and issues. Because of that, a lot of my time gets spent there, and I know a lot of the neighbors.

Last edited by TabulaRasa; 02-19-2017 at 10:20 PM..
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DallastoChicagotoKC View Post
It's true that the Plaza does have a fair amount of this already. But people have been increasingly opposed to any more of it. I just think that's a mistake. It blows me away that the neighborhood just north of the Plaza is still mostly run down -- not dangerous, just run down. That seems to me a prime area for redevelopment, but the plans I've heard of have been greatly reduced or scrapped altogether because of resident opposition. The Polsinelli law firm got run off the Plaza (granted, they're still very close by) even when they modified their plans to leave all current Plaza buildings in place because people feared traffic and whatnot. As I've said, the Plaza is great. I just think people idolize it a little too much and have stifled its growth. That's one of the top spots to encourage growth in this city, and I'm disappointed that developments have met with such opposition.
Between your comments here, your description of Dan Coffey, and what I know of the fuss over KCI, I get a very strong impression that there are a sizable number of Kansas Citians who appear to want to preserve the city in amber as it is now.

Like you, I think that a grave mistake. It also seems to me to run counter to the city's historic let's-get-it-done attitude. Was it something introduced into the water supply?
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:18 PM
Status: "You got to know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Middle America
36,281 posts, read 41,079,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DallastoChicagotoKC View Post
It's true that the Plaza does have a fair amount of this already. But people have been increasingly opposed to any more of it. I just think that's a mistake. It blows me away that the neighborhood just north of the Plaza is still mostly run down -- not dangerous, just run down. That seems to me a prime area for redevelopment...
Much of this specific neighborhood, though, actually has been in the process of redeveloping in the past five years. A number of rundown and blighted multiunit properties that were standing as recently as 2012-14 have been demolished, and facelifts to existing structures have been ongoing. Because I lived there, I watched it happen. I rented for a brief transitional period in a building immediately east of 47th Street where there were no long-term leases, everything was month-to-month, because the building owner was very upfront that he was approached by developers constantly, and once the right price was named, that would be that. I moved on before that happened, but it did happen.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yeah, I caught that, but too late to edit the post (window is what, a few hours?).

What I'd intended to type was Cleaver and Agnes. I figured someone (likely you, given your connection to the neighborhood) would catch it, but, again, missed the editing window.
Your hubby's place of employment probably has an excellent view of the Paraclete Manor senior housing tower, where my cousin Leon Masterson lives. Another Masterson cousin lives three blocks west, on Olive just off Cleaver. She poured a good chunk of change into updating her mother's home; i told her I wanted to steal its kitchen and take it back to Philly with me in 2014. The shame is that should she or another family member ever decide to sell the place, they'd not get back anywhere near what she invested in it.

My folks are thick on the ground around there.

From the sound of it, you have a great church community around you. Was it the community engagement that attracted you to it?
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:38 PM
Status: "You got to know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Middle America
36,281 posts, read 41,079,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Your hubby's place of employment probably has an excellent view of the Paraclete Manor senior housing tower, where my cousin Leon Masterson lives. Another Masterson cousin lives three blocks west, on Olive just off Cleaver. She poured a good chunk of change into updating her mother's home; i told her I wanted to steal its kitchen and take it back to Philly with me in 2014. The shame is that should she or another family member ever decide to sell the place, they'd not get back anywhere near what she invested in it.

My folks are thick on the ground around there.
Yep...I actually spend a decent amount of time volunteering at his workplace, and I usually go by that tower (they had a recent fire, no?).

Quote:
From the sound of it, you have a great church community around you. Was it the community engagement that attracted you to it?
Yeah, I'm a lifelong ELCA Lutheran (distinction from the markedly more socially conservative LCMS branch, which is by far more prevalent in this area, is relevant, so I always mention it), and that particular denomination's roots in social justice is something I've been pretty steeped in from childhood on, through my undergrad at a Lutheran liberal arts college in Minnesota. Putting faith into tangible action is a priority, and, with many congregations, the more locally, the better.

I'm also an alumnus of the D.C.-based Lutheran Volunteer Corps, which is modeled off the much older Jesuit Volunteer Corps, and is a nonprofit built around the concept of (mostly) young college graduates who dedicate a predetermined period of time, typically one to two years, to full-time volunteer service with urban human services-oriented nonprofits in cities around the U.S. It's AmeriCorps/domestic Peace Corps-like in structure in some ways, in that it's your "job" while you do it, but in place of a salary, you are provided with room, board, and a living stipend. When I did LVC, I worked exclusively with youth outreach and education (my background is secondary ed) on the far north side of Chicago, Rogers Park, which has quite a bit in common with East KC and the Northeast. It took a while to find a faith community of similar ideals when I moved to KC, but it happened.
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Old 02-22-2017, 06:20 PM
 
523 posts, read 495,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yeah, I caught that, but too late to edit the post (window is what, a few hours?).

What I'd intended to type was Cleaver and Agnes. I figured someone (likely you, given your connection to the neighborhood) would catch it, but, again, missed the editing window.



Church is actually 3800 Troost, corner of Troost and Mannheim, directly across from DeLaSalle. The building is a massive stone and slate structure, formerly St. Mark English Lutheran Church, upon dedication. Now home to St. Mark Hope and Peace Lutheran Church, ELCA, and a hosting building to several other worshiping groups of various faiths who are building partners. 39th and Troost is occupied by St. James Catholic parish, a sometimes partnering faith community.





It's mainly due to my church being in the area, and it being a faith community that is very deliberately highly engaged and active with the surrounding community. We are part of a community organizing network that is very focused on local needs and issues. Because of that, a lot of my time gets spent there, and I know a lot of the neighbors.
As a 4th generation member of Central Pres Church on Armour, I have such wonderful memories from the 1970's when Central Pres, Trinity Lutheran and St Marks vacation Bible school summers would combine and move from church to the other. I spent many summers in the 1970s at St Marks'. What a wonderful time that was and the churches back then were full of faithful and loving members.
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Old 02-22-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,566 posts, read 2,189,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yep...I actually spend a decent amount of time volunteering at his workplace, and I usually go by that tower (they had a recent fire, no?).
Sometime in the summer of 2016. The first-floor entrance (from the parking lot) was boarded up when I visited Leon in September.



Quote:
Yeah, I'm a lifelong ELCA Lutheran (distinction from the markedly more socially conservative LCMS branch, which is by far more prevalent in this area, is relevant, so I always mention it), and that particular denomination's roots in social justice is something I've been pretty steeped in from childhood on, through my undergrad at a Lutheran liberal arts college in Minnesota. Putting faith into tangible action is a priority, and, with many congregations, the more locally, the better.

I'm also an alumnus of the D.C.-based Lutheran Volunteer Corps, which is modeled off the much older Jesuit Volunteer Corps, and is a nonprofit built around the concept of (mostly) young college graduates who dedicate a predetermined period of time, typically one to two years, to full-time volunteer service with urban human services-oriented nonprofits in cities around the U.S. It's AmeriCorps/domestic Peace Corps-like in structure in some ways, in that it's your "job" while you do it, but in place of a salary, you are provided with room, board, and a living stipend. When I did LVC, I worked exclusively with youth outreach and education (my background is secondary ed) on the far north side of Chicago, Rogers Park, which has quite a bit in common with East KC and the Northeast. It took a while to find a faith community of similar ideals when I moved to KC, but it happened.
Glad you found one.
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Old 02-26-2017, 04:37 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
5,845 posts, read 6,174,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DallastoChicagotoKC View Post
Hello, everyone. This is my first post, but I've been lurking for a long time. I've lived in several cities throughout the middle of the country, and have lived in KC for the last 5 years. Being a "city enthusiast," I've always paid attention to the goings on where I've lived in terms of how the city I'm living in functions. I think KC has a lot of great attributes. At the same time, there are some things I would prefer to be different. Every city I've lived in seems to have some collective misconceptions about itself. Here's five that I feel KC has. I'm not trying to trash talk KC at all. I chose to move here, and I choose to stay here. That doesn't mean it's perfect, though. I hope this doesn't offend anyone. They're just my thoughts. I'm curious what your thoughts are.
As another transplant, here are my thoughts.

Quote:
1. KC is a small town. I say this is a misconception people have not because people literally think KC is small, but because people seem to fear KC being big. I think there seems to be a somewhat common antipathy to growth in KC. People fight development here more than the other places I've lived. People fight investing in growth here more than other places I've lived. And they seem to do it because of fears of traffic (which I discuss below), crowds, density etc and just change in general. My suspicion is that a lot of people have moved here from smaller towns, and thus KC already seems crowded and complex to them. In Dallas, a large majority is willing to spend tax and other public dollars on growth. KC not so much. And it feels like that all goes back to a pervasive sense of being small town and not needing all that big city stuff. KC is not a small town. It's a city. Let it act like a city.
I have to respectfully disagree with the "misconception" that KC is a small town, but I concur with your reasoning. I've met a lot of people from small towns in Kansas and Missouri who honestly think Kansas City is "the big city". They have no idea what a big city is because they've been never been to Chicago, New York, etc so they have no basis of comparison. I concur with your opinion about antipathy towards growth, but I think it's because they think it's TOO big, even though that's hardly the case.

Quote:
2. KC has traffic problems (or will). This is a huge misconception around here. KC has virtually no traffic. Maybe three spots in this city get a little backed up for an hour in the morning and an hour in the evening. You could double the traffic here, even in the most congested areas, and still be way better than most other cities. I really feel no project or plan or development should ever be denied here because of traffic. It's just not a problem.
True, for the most part. I moved here from Southern California and the lack of traffic was a breath of fresh air. But some areas can get backed up for more than an hour. For example, on I-35 around Shawnee it can get very backed up. You have the 169, 69, and I-635 all feeding into I-35 and it can be very congested for several hours. I'm not sure that KC is any better or worse than its peer cities with regard to traffic.

Quote:
3. The Plaza is special. The Plaza is really cool. No doubt about it. People from out of town love it too. But I've also spoken with people from Des Moines, Omaha and other such places who point out that the Plaza no longer has much that those cities don't already have. So they have no reason to go there anymore. And most cities I've lived in have charming urban commercial districts. Although the Plaza's architecture is unique, it's concept is not. In Chicago, for example, there are a dozen or more cool little downtown areas scattered throughout the suburbs that resemble the Plaza. Downtown Naperville comes to mind. Downtown Evanston too. Des Moines has the East Village. Dallas has Midtown and the Village. Minneapolis has Uptown and the Grand Avenue area (in addition to suburban downtowns). The Plaza should be allowed to grow and develop into a neighborhood, and the "save the Plaza" people should realize that limiting growth there only hurts it in the long run. It needs office, residential and retail to continue to thrive. It can't just be a shopping center anymore.
I'm sorry, but comparing Evanston or Naperville of all places to the Plaza is quite inaccurate. The shopping can be duplicated but the architecture and ambience cannot. I have been to many places and the Plaza is actually very unique. To compare it to suburban shopping districts is somewhat reductive, and ignores its historical and cultural impact. There is more than just shopping and dining on the Plaza. It's right next to an amazing museum and has other cultural institutions like the Unity Temple, not to mention the cultural institutions it has like the Plaza Lighting, Plaza Art Fair, Waterfire, etc. I agree it could be much more than it is and it needs to pull away from the focus on retail and become a more live/work destination, but it has more culture IMO than bland Naperville.

Quote:
4. KC is growing fast (downtown included). KC is growing. And downtown KC has come back from near death. But unfortunately, it's nothing special compared to other cities. It's not as amazing as people around here think. Omaha, Des Moines and OKC are all growing faster in population and jobs than KC. So are MPLS and Denver. KC has a lot to offer compared to most of those cities. I'm not sure what's holding it back, but something is. KC is better than its current growth. It needs to figure out how to compete better. People definitely shouldn't be satisfied yet.
I'm not sure who you are speaking with that has these misconceptions, but I haven't heard anyone mention how KC is exploding in growth. Some people may have these misconceptions due to what they see in isolated pockets but I don't think anything is really happening on ground level that indicates explosive growth.

Quote:
5. KC doesn't need a new airport. I get that KCI has its convenience factor. But as he gateway to our city, it's an embarrassment. And honestly, most of the time when I fly out of the SW terminal, I end up having to park elsewhere because the ramp is full. So it's not that convenient. It is an old, dysfunctional, outdated, nearly-obsolete airport. Airlines and the Feds are willing to buy us a new airport and we somehow still want to turn it down. Voters in McKinney Texas voted to raise their own taxes to build a $70 million high school football stadium. I question the prudence of that, but it illustrates the way some people think about investing in their communities and the future. We can't even get people on board with an airport others have agreed to pay for. I realize the comparison is somewhat apples to oranges. But I think it illustrates the different mindsets people in the Dallas area have compared to here.
KC DOESN'T need a new airport. It needs to fix the one it has. I'm assuming that's what you were getting at.

Quote:
One other thing -- not so much a misconception as a misperception. This is one city. I live in JoCo and work near the Plaza. In past lives I lived in downtown Chicago and Minneapolis (among other places). Both sides of the state line have a lot to offer and have their share of problems. Plenty of people in JoCo need to stop being so sheltered and take advantage of what KCMO has to offer (not just the Chiefs and Royals). You're not going to get shot (sheesh). And people in KCMO need to realize that every city has its suburbs. If they weren't in KS, they'd be somewhere in Missouri and would be no different than they are in KS. Hug it out, folks. We need to work together.
Agreed, but unlike most cities, the affluent suburbs answer to a different state government that exists in a completely different dimension from the state that KC and the MO suburbs deal with. There are different interests at play, which has manifested itself in various derogatory ways. I think that for KC to truly be a cohesive metro, the powers that be need to grow up, put their differences aside, and work together for the benefit of the metro area as a whole.
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