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View Poll Results: How "Southern" is Kansas City?
Significantly more Midwestern than Southern 77 71.96%
Moderately more Midwestern than Southern 21 19.63%
Moderately more Southern than Midwestern 1 0.93%
Significantly more Southern than Midwestern 1 0.93%
About equally Midwestern and Southern 7 6.54%
Voters: 107. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-27-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
I don't see a lot of similarities between KC and Milwaukee. I think St. Louis would be a lot better comparison to Milwaukee to use.
I think St. Louis and Milwaukee are quite similar -- I get the same vibe. Might be the European heritage, industrial past, old-style brick structures, and an eastern-looking facade. These cities were trying to impress the easterners. Coming from StL I can see similarities. I like Kansas City but it has a different feel to it and I like the differences. It's a younger place and has a little bit of the west and plains while not being in it. The east was less important. The American Royal Livestock Show is still a big deal. There were cattle drives back in the day. There is much more midwestern-ness than anything southern in KC.
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Old 08-27-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
The American Royal Livestock Show is still a big deal.
No it's not and never really was. The AR has always been an afterthought for most locals. Pretty much nobody cares except for the AR BBQ contest, but even that is not a very large "festival" that is attended by huge masses of people. The AR was supported heavily by the FFA convention when it was in KC and when that left, the AR basically died. They are trying to hang on using incentives from Kansas and have moved to the speedway area.

KCMO is not a very "country" town at all. Honestly, it has more of an eastern feel to it than a western. The suburbs can be country in a way, but it's more blue collar than country. KC is a pretty white collar metro overall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
You’d be wrong. The top station is an oldies station, then a “classic rock” station. The rock and pop stations have more listeners than all the country stations combined. In fact the top country station only edges out the hip-hop and R&B station by 0.1 market share, which is about 30K listeners in our market. There’s not a Christian radio station in the top 20 in the market.

Not sure that “do they listen to country music?” is the best litmus test if the theory is the heart of the Midwest is Pecatonica, IL.
I always thought KC's top radio station was the urban station there. 103.3 or something like that.
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Old 08-27-2018, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
No it's not and never really was. The AR has always been an afterthought for most locals. Pretty much nobody cares except for the AR BBQ contest, but even that is not a very large "festival" that is attended by huge masses of people. The AR was supported heavily by the FFA convention when it was in KC and when that left, the AR basically died. They are trying to hang on using incentives from Kansas and have moved to the speedway area.

KCMO is not a very "country" town at all. Honestly, it has more of an eastern feel to it than a western. The suburbs can be country in a way, but it's more blue collar than country. KC is a pretty white collar metro overall.



I always thought KC's top radio station was the urban station there. 103.3 or something like that.
(emphasis added)

Guys in cowboy boots and ten-gallon hats may not have been thick on the ground in Kansas City, but the city had the second-most-important stockyards in the country after Chicago's. Agriculture and meatpacking played (and still play, minus the meatpacking) a much larger role in the metro economy than they do in any city I'd call "Eastern."

I still maintain that St. Louis is the last great city of the East and Kansas City the first great city of the West. And here I'm speaking broadly, for I will acknowledge that the city's character is more Midwestern than "Western." But it's still not Eastern. Living as I recall you do in another East Coast metropolis, I find that statement a little surprising on your part - and I say that even though I draw parallels between the Eastern city I live in now and the Midwestern one I grew up in often.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
(emphasis added)

Guys in cowboy boots and ten-gallon hats may not have been thick on the ground in Kansas City, but the city had the second-most-important stockyards in the country after Chicago's. Agriculture and meatpacking played (and still play, minus the meatpacking) a much larger role in the metro economy than they do in any city I'd call "Eastern."

I still maintain that St. Louis is the last great city of the East and Kansas City the first great city of the West. And here I'm speaking broadly, for I will acknowledge that the city's character is more Midwestern than "Western." But it's still not Eastern. Living as I recall you do in another East Coast metropolis, I find that statement a little surprising on your part - and I say that even though I draw parallels between the Eastern city I live in now and the Midwestern one I grew up in often.
I realize KC was a cowtown, but it never really had cowtown culture. Cattle processing was just an industry, just like automobile manufacturing is today. From a agriculture perspective, KC is more like Chicago than Dallas.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I realize KC was a cowtown, but it never really had cowtown culture. Cattle processing was just an industry, just like automobile manufacturing is today. From a agriculture perspective, KC is more like Chicago than Dallas.
True, KC never was the Cowtown that eastern snob cities tried to make it out to be. It's a midwestern, plains cities with many industries. KC was actually settled by easterners and had/has a culture that is unique..
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Old 08-27-2018, 08:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovekcmo View Post
True, KC never was the Cowtown that eastern snob cities tried to make it out to be. It's a midwestern, plains cities with many industries. KC was actually settled by easterners and had/has a culture that is unique..
There is still some southern influences in KC though and as I pointed out the suburbs still have those stronger influences.

They're still stronger than St. Louis's and as I said before there is still traces of southern influences left in St. Louis even though today it's midwestern it's still there though.

50 percent of the state of Missouri is midwestern, 25 percent of it lies in that transition zone a mixture and the other 25 percent is fully southern.

You could probably find about 5 or 6 different sub cultures in Missouri. For example in the transition zone places like Farmington in the Ozarks have the midwestern and upper south Ozarks influence while somewhere like Jackson MO is more of a Delta style southern influence along with some midwestern since it's in southeast MO.

Just like West Plains, Branson, Neosho Missouri are the Ozarks, upper south southern while Caruthersville is more Delta Deep South.

The midwestern influence of St. Louis is a lot different than KC. KC midwestern influences are more plains like Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma type while Stl is more rust belt like Ohio and east coast type.
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Old 08-28-2018, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
There is still some southern influences in KC though and as I pointed out the suburbs still have those stronger influences.

They're still stronger than St. Louis's and as I said before there is still traces of southern influences left in St. Louis even though today it's midwestern it's still there though.

50 percent of the state of Missouri is midwestern, 25 percent of it lies in that transition zone a mixture and the other 25 percent is fully southern.

You could probably find about 5 or 6 different sub cultures in Missouri. For example in the transition zone places like Farmington in the Ozarks have the midwestern and upper south Ozarks influence while somewhere like Jackson MO is more of a Delta style southern influence along with some midwestern since it's in southeast MO.

Just like West Plains, Branson, Neosho Missouri are the Ozarks, upper south southern while Caruthersville is more Delta Deep South.

The midwestern influence of St. Louis is a lot different than KC. KC midwestern influences are more plains like Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma type while Stl is more rust belt like Ohio and east coast type.
I think it's what you point out in that last paragrpah that I'm referring to when I call St. Louis "the last great city of the East" and Kansas City "the first great city of the West."

Even though both agriculture and industry can be found throughout the entire Midwest, its eastern half (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan,Wisconsin) is more "industrial" in character and its western half (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, both Dakotas) more "agricultural."

BTW, when it comes to your point about Southern influence, this guy's got your back:

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in? | The Washington Post

Portland (Me.) Press Herald reporter Colin Woodward's book "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" is an updated and more sophisticated version of Joel Garreau's 1981 book "The Nine Nations of North America," and he draws the (county-based) boundaries of his 11 nations differently than Garreau did. (In Garreau's book, Kansas City was the capital of the nation he called "the Breadbasket" - which, he wrote, was "the nation that works best." The border between it and "Dixie," by the way, passed just to Kansas City's southeast and just to St. Louis' north.)

You might note that in Woodward's geography, Missouri is divided almost neatly in two between the nation he calls "the Midlands" and the one he calls "Greater Appalachia." The Midlands stretches in a narrow band from southern New Jersey across the northern parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, takes in all of Iowa, Kansas' eastern half, northwest Oklahoma, the counties on the west bank of the Missouri in Nebraska and the Dakotas, and northwest and north-central Missouri. A little finger of this nation projects into Greater Appalachia, following a string of counties along the Missouri across eastern Missouri until it reaches St. Louis. Both of Missouri's two largest cities, along with my home of Philadelphia, Toledo and Chicago (which lies on the border with "Yankeedom"), are located in this nation.

But "Greater Appalachia" surrounds St. Louis on three sides and begins just south of Kansas City.

The "Deep South," by the way, takes in the Bootheel.

And the Washington, DC region, where kcmo lives, is split among three nations: Greater Appalachia, the Midlands and Tidewater.

One other point about "Southern influence":

As I think we all know, there are two ways to pronounce "Missouri" - one that ends in an "ee" sound and the other that ends in a schwa, close to "uh".

The latter pronunciation is more common in the southern part of the state - and in and around Kansas City. St. Louisans, by and large, use the "-ee" ending, as do I.

Last edited by MarketStEl; 08-28-2018 at 03:42 AM..
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Old 08-28-2018, 08:55 AM
 
1,465 posts, read 1,051,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I think it's what you point out in that last paragrpah that I'm referring to when I call St. Louis "the last great city of the East" and Kansas City "the first great city of the West."

Even though both agriculture and industry can be found throughout the entire Midwest, its eastern half (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan,Wisconsin) is more "industrial" in character and its western half (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, both Dakotas) more "agricultural."

BTW, when it comes to your point about Southern influence, this guy's got your back:

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in? | The Washington Post

Portland (Me.) Press Herald reporter Colin Woodward's book "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" is an updated and more sophisticated version of Joel Garreau's 1981 book "The Nine Nations of North America," and he draws the (county-based) boundaries of his 11 nations differently than Garreau did. (In Garreau's book, Kansas City was the capital of the nation he called "the Breadbasket" - which, he wrote, was "the nation that works best." The border between it and "Dixie," by the way, passed just to Kansas City's southeast and just to St. Louis' north.)

You might note that in Woodward's geography, Missouri is divided almost neatly in two between the nation he calls "the Midlands" and the one he calls "Greater Appalachia." The Midlands stretches in a narrow band from southern New Jersey across the northern parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, takes in all of Iowa, Kansas' eastern half, northwest Oklahoma, the counties on the west bank of the Missouri in Nebraska and the Dakotas, and northwest and north-central Missouri. A little finger of this nation projects into Greater Appalachia, following a string of counties along the Missouri across eastern Missouri until it reaches St. Louis. Both of Missouri's two largest cities, along with my home of Philadelphia, Toledo and Chicago (which lies on the border with "Yankeedom"), are located in this nation.

But "Greater Appalachia" surrounds St. Louis on three sides and begins just south of Kansas City.

The "Deep South," by the way, takes in the Bootheel.

And the Washington, DC region, where kcmo lives, is split among three nations: Greater Appalachia, the Midlands and Tidewater.

One other point about "Southern influence":

As I think we all know, there are two ways to pronounce "Missouri" - one that ends in an "ee" sound and the other that ends in a schwa, close to "uh".

The latter pronunciation is more common in the southern part of the state - and in and around Kansas City. St. Louisans, by and large, use the "-ee" ending, as do I.
Also. St. Louis is older than KC too which could play a factor maybe. I see a lot of people say how Baltimore and St. Louis are similar. Especially post civil war they both became less southern and more industrialized. Heck, even today both cities have very similar problems as well.
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Old 08-28-2018, 08:23 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovekcmo View Post
True, KC never was the Cowtown that eastern snob cities tried to make it out to be. It's a midwestern, plains cities with many industries. KC was actually settled by easterners and had/has a culture that is unique..
"Eastern snob cities," thanks for the laugh. You must think the entire eastern US is the I-95 Megalopolis corridor from DC to Boston. The eastern half of the US is all areas along and east of the Mississippi River, and includes the majority of the population of the Midwest as well.
They do have plenty of good laughs about "those people" that elected dumb hayseeds like Brownback, though...
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Old 08-28-2018, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
"Eastern snob cities," thanks for the laugh. You must think the entire eastern US is the I-95 Megalopolis corridor from DC to Boston. The eastern half of the US is all areas along and east of the Mississippi River, and includes the majority of the population of the Midwest as well.
They do have plenty of good laughs about "those people" that elected dumb hayseeds like Brownback, though...
Pretty much. Even the east coast has plenty of smaller cities, towns and rural areas just outside the Bos-Wash corridor.

I would agree that people in places like DC don't think about KC as a cowtown. They don't really put much thought into places like KC (StL, Indy etc) at all. But they do think much of the midwest (including the major cities) are a bunch of far right conservatives.
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