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Old 09-07-2011, 11:39 PM
 
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Just a twang, not a drawl. Okies & Arkies have a drawl.
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Old 09-12-2011, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Having lived in both metros, I would agree with this.

In Johnson county there were lots of "neutral" accents, of course, I think largely because many were transplants from other areas or their parents were. But my experience was that the speech of multi-generational KC area natives definitely has a southern influence. Not strong enough in most cases to call it a drawl....more like a "country" sound.
I really notice it with my own family. They're all from the KC area, but I moved away 25 years ago. It's an odd accent that I've lost, and have a hard time duplicating.

I would say the people I've known who grew up in NW Kansas have the least "southern" or "twangy" accent, sounding more like people in the West.
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:36 PM
 
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It's funny 'cause I moved to Kansas from Texas a month ago and people from my school asked me why I didn't have a accent. It's very stereotypical to say southerners have accents. If you're talking about that "hill billy" accent then you'll find them in small towns, usually when there's farmland there will be that kind of accent. I never met a person with a accent in big towns, only small towns like the one I just moved to in Kansas.

That type of accent is more common in far east Texas and east of there, in Alabama, Louisiana, etc.
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Old 09-25-2011, 02:40 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schmidty223 View Post
It's funny 'cause I moved to Kansas from Texas a month ago and people from my school asked me why I didn't have a accent. It's very stereotypical to say southerners have accents. If you're talking about that "hill billy" accent then you'll find them in small towns, usually when there's farmland there will be that kind of accent. I never met a person with a accent in big towns, only small towns like the one I just moved to in Kansas.

That type of accent is more common in far east Texas and east of there, in Alabama, Louisiana, etc.
Sounds like you're quibbling more about the definition of accent and southerner more than anything else.

If you never met a person with an accent in big towns, then you are simply redefining the word accent to mean that which is different from you or the sound you are accustomed to, which renders it pretty meaningless. Regional accents are very typical and prevalent in "big towns" throughout the country - and that most certainly includes the South. The southern accent is probably the most distinctive and widely known.

But there are regional accents in the North and Midwest, too. Ever been to Chicago? It's unmistakeable once you've heard it a few times and identified it. And then there's the big town of New York with its notorious sound - which is impossible to confuse with the sound of big towns like Dallas, Houston, or Albuquerque.
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Old 09-25-2011, 10:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I would say Omaha is closer to neutral accent wise than Kansas City.
I once read that Iowa is the state with the least-obvious accent...i.e. the most neutral sound......right across the river from Omaha!......

and this leads to the pop/soda/Coke debate....and sneakers or tennis shoes?.....dinner or supper?
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Old 09-30-2011, 02:27 PM
 
Location: USA
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I am constantly told by people from the East that I have a definite accent. However, to me, people from the East Coast are the ones with the accent -- shrug --
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Old 09-30-2011, 06:52 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red On The Noodle View Post
I am constantly told by people from the East that I have a definite accent. However, to me, people from the East Coast are the ones with the accent -- shrug --
Are you from Kansas?
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Old 10-02-2011, 06:23 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Are you from Kansas?

Yes.
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:46 PM
 
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I moved to NE kansas from Oklahoma and I haven't ever noticed any "twang" or southern accent. Why would Kansans have a southern accent?. . . it's not part of the south. Coming home to Oklahoma I do realize the accents there more. Obviously everyone has an accent, just depends on who is listening.

Being that Kansas is generally considered part of the midwest, I would say that they have a midwestern accent. The midwestern accent does not have to be the same with every state or area within the midwest. Yes, someone from Omaha may sound a little different than someone from Kansas City. Just the same as how someone from North Carolina wouldn't sound the same as someone from Mississippi.
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:50 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgenokie View Post
I moved to NE kansas from Oklahoma and I haven't ever noticed any "twang" or southern accent. Why would Kansans have a southern accent?. . . it's not part of the south. Coming home to Oklahoma I do realize the accents there more. Obviously everyone has an accent, just depends on who is listening.

Being that Kansas is generally considered part of the midwest, I would say that they have a midwestern accent. The midwestern accent does not have to be the same with every state or area within the midwest. Yes, someone from Omaha may sound a little different than someone from Kansas City. Just the same as how someone from North Carolina wouldn't sound the same as someone from Mississippi.
Well, your case example is Oklahoma which has a more defined southern linguistic component compared to Kansas. Parts of Kansas have a more noticeable twang or rural flavored accent that is a bit southern, but not like the states further to the south. However, Kansans sound a bit more southern lingusitically compared to rest of the northern tier states. I am originally from the KC metro area, lived in Kansas, and other states in the northern tier. Kansas is not a northern state, period. The northern dialect generally has sharper and more pronounced vowel sounds with speech patterns being a bit more rapid and less relaxed.
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