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Old 02-14-2013, 10:29 AM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
1,481 posts, read 2,415,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
And real Kansans are ashamed of you.
Absolutely.
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:31 AM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
1,481 posts, read 2,415,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
SE Kansas was also heavily settled by immigrants from the Balkans and mining regions in western Pennsylvania.
Lots and lots of German heritage in SE Kansas as well. Not that that has anything to do with this thread topic.
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Old 02-19-2013, 06:52 AM
 
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Coming from central Kansas (and having moved away and returned quite a bit), I find that most people pretty much stick to standard American pronunciation, but there are a few who definitely deviate into some kind of drawl/twang, which i would call a combination of Texas and upper Midwest (makes sense, geographically). These tend to be the more rural, firmly-rooted types. Accents often tell us as much about a person's self image as where they're from. Even in the Deep South, some people just don't pick up the accent like others do. But you definitely don't get a true Southern accent in Kansas. When I *try* to speak with a Southern accent, I end up sounding like a Texan instead. And no, that's not the same.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:39 PM
 
697 posts, read 963,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mshultz View Post
When I visited Hays this June, it sounded just like Northeast Ohio to me. Nobody said to me: "You're not from around here, are you?"

There are people in this part of Ohio who do say worsh and Worshington, crick, feesh, Meechigan, etc (my spell checker is complaining about these phonetic spellings). My 9th grade English teacher told us that saying worsh and Worshington sounded uneducated. I made sure not to do that.

Both Ohio and Kansas pronounce many city names differently. Wooster, for instance is pronounced "Wuster", not "Woooster". I learned how to pronounce Salina, Trego, and Arkansas when I was in Kansas.
I've never been to Ohio, but I've spent time in Omaha and Des Moines and really don't hear a difference in accent from what I hear at home in Kansas. I've spent time in Arkansas and Missouri and hear a major difference!

My husband grew up near Salina and he says "worsh" and "Worshington". Drives me batty, but he insists he is not saying it that way. He can't even hear himself saying it. I grew up in SE Kansas and I never heard "wash" spoken as "worsh" in my family or by really anyone that I was close to until him!
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:56 PM
 
697 posts, read 963,087 times
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Originally Posted by soanchorless View Post
As a kid, I was always so confused when people from Kansas displayed confederate flags since ya know, Kansas wasn't part of the south. Anyway. This is an old thread, eh?

Yes, it's kind of weird since Kansas was always a Free State. It was called Bloody Kansas because of the fights between the pro-slavery Border Missourians and the anti-slavery Free-State Kansans. Confederate flags in Kansas are kind of an insult, I'd think. I never saw them much around in my home town, but I think a lot of Union soldiers settled there. Look at all the stuff in Kansas named for Ulysses S. Grant. (The street I grew up on for one, because supposedly he owned land near there at one time.)

But, back to the topic, I don't think Kansans have a southern drawl; more of a western twang. I exaggerate mine on purpose sometimes - just to sound more friendly. When I talk to colleagues in Arkansas, even by phone, within a matter of minutes, I'm absorbing their speech style and sounding just like them. I wonder if Kansans, with the less pronounced accent, tend to pick up other accents more readily?
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Old 03-25-2013, 11:13 PM
 
697 posts, read 963,087 times
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Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
Part of SE Kansas was settled by people from Kentucky, Tennessee and Texas and you can definitely hear the influence. Part of SE aligned it self with the confederates.
Fort Scott is in SE Kansas. It was a Union military headquarters. There were probably a few Confederate sympathizers all over Kansas, but nothing I ever learned or heard growing up in SE Kansas ever implied that part of SE Kansas was aligned with the Confederates. I actually have always believed a lot of Union soldiers settled there. Maybe you can point me to some books to read about it?

I will say that the family lore is that one of the ancestors was a Confederate deserter from Tennessee. Classy, eh? But, even so, I don't think "deserter" is a term that suggests "aligned with". I would think such a southerner would try real hard to hide his accent! LOL
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Old 07-18-2016, 06:28 PM
 
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I live in Kansas, and have always gone to Oklahoma a lot, and sometimes Texas, and everyone i have talked to sounds the same, or at least the same type of accents i have heard in Kansas (southern Kansas, like Sumner, outside of Wichita, and by Elkhart, etc) I never once was asked if i was from somewhere else, nor did i think others sounded different. However, if you go southeast (alabama, georgia) you start to notice it more. One of my friends is from North Carolina, and they have less of a drawl than i do. For example, my family will say meeeilk for milk and i noticed this when my friend from N.C. told me to just say Milk with the i and not to stretch it out lol.
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