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Old 08-02-2013, 03:30 PM
 
11,928 posts, read 13,315,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Comparison:

Leawood, KS
Leawood (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Carmel, IN
Carmel (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

The only big differences are Carmel, IN has more affordable housing prices and a greater level of diversity. Leawood, KS has a higher median household income and a somewhat higher level educational attainment. Carmel, IN is growing much faster in population, though.
Do you think that might be because Leawood is land locked and there is no more available space TO grow? I mean you can only fit so many people into existing houses and no place to build new ones.
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:39 PM
 
Location: IN
19,327 posts, read 32,177,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
Do you think that might be because Leawood is land locked and there is no more available space TO grow? I mean you can only fit so many people into existing houses and no place to build new ones.
That is likely the case unless they keep annexing more land which is unlikely since the southern border of Leawood is adjacent to Stilwell. Overland Park kept annexing for many years, but I doubt that is occurring with much regularity these days. Carmel is a very nice area and the county it's located in has a higher median household income than Johnson County.
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:42 PM
 
Location: IN
19,327 posts, read 32,177,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calitalia View Post
Thanks again. I appreciate all the comments and suggestions. Not sure about the "snob" one though. I've only met nice people in KS and enjoyed my stay. I read an article from a Boston Globe reporter that said something to the effect "There are just some places where the people are nicer." I believe we are moving to Leawood. Now the Real question: follow KU or K State? Kidding.
Well, you have different choices regarding Leawood. You have the much more established "old Leawood" inside 435 that is more Midwest like overall, very wooded, more traditional architectural styles, and larger lot sizes. You also have newer areas of Leawood south of 435 that are even more expensive with house sizes that tend to be very large. Regardless, $300-350K for a house in Leawood is considered low. IMHO Leawood does have somewhat of a snob factor, but that is mainly due to the zoning there. They have ensured that only certain types of development and businesses should be allowed in and most of the city is now built out entirely- so that reality has come true. However, they have a low tax base compared to Overland Park (has a massive amount of commercial real estate and businesses that pay taxes) so Leawood will have a higher overall tax rate which means higher property taxes.
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Old 08-02-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: out west somewhere
166 posts, read 212,850 times
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Default Welcome to the Sunflower State

Hope you like it here-in spite of some weather stuff,it's nice here and prob the least expensive housing I have ever seen out here on the plains.Keep posting and let us know where and when you move and how you like it.
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Old 08-02-2013, 04:46 PM
 
Location: out west somewhere
166 posts, read 212,850 times
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Default and one more link to add

Quote:
Originally Posted by bev osborn View Post
tornadoalleylive.comstaff 2nd paragraph---www.crh.noaa.gov.ict? this is re the F3s in Ks On a site called Tornadoalley-it states Ks and Ok have the most tornadoes per square mile.
From the book re the EF5 that hit Topeka in 1960 AND HELL FOLLOWED WITH IT-I quote from page 48-IN TERMS OF INTENSITY,NO STATE HAS FACED MORE EF-5 TORNADOES THAN KANSAS,WITH 16 RECORDED BETWEEN 1880 and 2008."This is from the following sources--Thomas P Grazulis,SIGNIFICANT TORNADOES from 1880-1989-Vol 1-Discussion and Analysis(St.Johnsbury,VtEnvironmental Films.1991),22;also F5 and EF5 TORNADOES OF THE UNITED STATES,1950-Present,Storm Prediction Center://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/f5torns.html(accessed June 5.2009)

Enough sources for you?As you can see,this goes back to history-not what has happened in Ok in May--this is stats for all time.Hope this clears it up for everyone.
:
one more that makes it crystal clear--google this TOP TEN KANSAS TORNADOES NOAA
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Old 08-02-2013, 04:53 PM
 
Location: out west somewhere
166 posts, read 212,850 times
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Talking One more sums it all up

Quote:
Originally Posted by bev osborn View Post
tornadoalleylive.comstaff 2nd paragraph---www.crh.noaa.gov.ict? this is re the F3s in Ks On a site called Tornadoalley-it states Ks and Ok have the most tornadoes per square mile.
From the book re the EF5 that hit Topeka in 1960 AND HELL FOLLOWED WITH IT-I quote from page 48-IN TERMS OF INTENSITY,NO STATE HAS FACED MORE EF-5 TORNADOES THAN KANSAS,WITH 16 RECORDED BETWEEN 1880 and 2008."This is from the following sources--Thomas P Grazulis,SIGNIFICANT TORNADOES from 1880-1989-Vol 1-Discussion and Analysis(St.Johnsbury,VtEnvironmental Films.1991),22;also F5 and EF5 TORNADOES OF THE UNITED STATES,1950-Present,Storm Prediction Center://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/f5torns.html(accessed June 5.2009)

Enough sources for you?As you can see,this goes back to history-not what has happened in Ok in May--this is stats for all time.Hope this clears it up for everyone.
:
Google this:

TOP TEN KANSAS TORNADOES NOAA---- It explains a lot of the stuff already mentioned,from ks weather history.
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:18 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
6,494 posts, read 4,853,812 times
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Enough already with the tornadoes.

No one is blind to the minimal risk. But, all things considered and factored in life, it is truly a non-issue.
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:54 PM
 
44,654 posts, read 35,315,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bev osborn View Post
tornadoalleylive.comstaff 2nd paragraph---www.crh.noaa.gov.ict? this is re the F3s in Ks On a site called Tornadoalley-it states Ks and Ok have the most tornadoes per square mile.
From the book re the EF5 that hit Topeka in 1960 AND HELL FOLLOWED WITH IT-I quote from page 48-IN TERMS OF INTENSITY,NO STATE HAS FACED MORE EF-5 TORNADOES THAN KANSAS,WITH 16 RECORDED BETWEEN 1880 and 2008."This is from the following sources--Thomas P Grazulis,SIGNIFICANT TORNADOES from 1880-1989-Vol 1-Discussion and Analysis(St.Johnsbury,VtEnvironmental Films.1991),22;also F5 and EF5 TORNADOES OF THE UNITED STATES,1950-Present,Storm Prediction Center://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/f5torns.html(accessed June 5.2009)

Enough sources for you?As you can see,this goes back to history-not what has happened in Ok in May--this is stats for all time.Hope this clears it up for everyone.
:
1. I'm merely noting that poor OK has had 2 more F5's just in May of this year.
2. No question KS has a ton of tornados per square mile, the western part of the state with lots of whimpy tornado's dominates that stat.
3. Complete agree about your F3 commentary, KS is unquestionably a top state for Tornados. Leawood however is far enough east that they are no worse than say....Des Moines in terms of risk.

Thankyou for providing a lot of information, I definitely learned some things and I hope you have a great weekend. (with no tornados. )
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Old 08-02-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Sick of MI.
160 posts, read 345,534 times
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Kansas is larger than Oklahoma by 13,000 square miles, and is in fact the size of Great Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales combined). It has just under three million people. Oklahoma by contrast has a million more people so it is more dense. In terms of the number of people dead Oklahoma seems to be more. Even so, Alabama and Mississippi are the undisputed leaders in tornado deaths. They are right behind KS in F5 tornadoes but also have fewer basements.

Still it seems the most widespread death and destruction occurs in Oklahoma. F5 can be bad, but did anybody look at F4 stats? F4 is already going to flatten a house, so it doesn't make it any worse. Anything F4 and above will pretty much decimate you.

So yes KS has the most but OK does not have western KS to drive up the numbers, as the panhandle connects with Texas. If you start breaking things down considering area and population density you will realize that there are states worse than KS in terms of your chances of actually getting hit or killed in a tornado.

Since 1990 as I explained there were 34 deaths in KS, 28 of which occurred in just two years (1991 with 17 and 2007 with 11). There were no tornado deaths since 1966 when 16 people died in Topeka.

158 died in Missouri since then in just one tornado, Joplin. This was close to KS, but Joplin was part of a super outbreak, which happens once a generation. (You have go back to 1974 for something similar). But nobody died in Missouri since 51 died in 1957. Not one person died in between these two large tragedies in that entire state. They are big death tolls but the result of only three tornadoes 54 years apart (there were 2 deadly twisters in MO in 57). It may look big but what about the people who lived in Missouri during the 54 years nobody died? Were they cowering for 54 years?


Since 1990, discounting the Joplin disaster which truly is rare (a tornado F5 level coming through a major city and destroying the entire thing) a few stats stand out.

KS - 34 killed. Deaths in 1990, 1991, and 2007.

OK - 77 killed. Deaths in 1999, 2011, 2013.

AL - 193 killed. Deaths in 1998 and 2011.

MO - 153 killed. Deaths in 2011.

As you can see a lot of states had it worse than KS. The reality is that F5 tornadoes hitting in the deep south kill more since population density is much higher.

As a lot of people have said many of them have not seen tornadoes. I saw a thread like this in the Oklahoma forum after Moore's second tornado (the fact it was hit twice is being debated as to whether it is coincidental or whether there is a microclimate prone to tornadic activity). People asked why people stayed in OK.

Somebody remarked that they did not know anybody killed in a tornado in their entire life of living in OK.

That is not to say there is a higher chance you will see structural damage, this is more likely, but still most people do not lose their homes to tornadoes. The vast majority of tornadoes are going to knock over a few trees and rip shingles off roofs. The tornadoes which can really level houses are very rare, and nine times out of ten they occur in rural areas.

It is so extremely rare that a tornado will come down into an urban area. It can happen but once again it is very rare. People in Florida by contrast have to worry about hurricanes hundreds of miles wide. A tornado is in some ways like a miniature hurricane, although with higher winds inside of it, which is why it tends to do more damage where it hits. Still I feel like if I had to choose between living in a tornado zone or a hurricane zone I would pick tornadoes any day.

Last edited by ARPARP; 08-02-2013 at 08:48 PM..
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Old 08-02-2013, 08:40 PM
 
Location: out west somewhere
166 posts, read 212,850 times
Reputation: 135
Default for you maybe

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
Enough already with the tornadoes.

No one is blind to the minimal risk. But, all things considered and factored in life, it is truly a non-issue.
I think being blown up into the sky would kind of ruin most people's day--sure not the way I want to go.

Non-issue????? There are a lot of people who don't admit how dangerous Kansas really is-if they want to live in a bubble-good for them.
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